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I was wondering if there is any way I could extract domain names from the body of email messages in python. I was thinking of using regular expressions, but I am not too great in writing them, and was wondering if someone could help me out. Here's a sample email body:

<tr><td colspan="5"><font face="verdana" size="4" color="#999999"><b>Resource Links - </b></font><span class="snv"><a href="http://clk.about.com/?zi=4/RZ">Get Listed Here</a></span></td><td class="snv" valign="bottom" align="right"><a href="http://sprinks.about.com/faq/index.htm">What Is This?</a></td></tr><tr><td colspan="6" bgcolor="#999999"><img height="1" width="1"></td></tr><tr><td colspan="6"><map name="sgmap"><area href="http://x.about.com/sg/r/3412.htm?p=0&amp;ref=fooddrinksl_sg" shape="rect" coords="0, 0, 600, 20"><area href="http://x.about.com/sg/r/3412.htm?p=1&amp;ref=fooddrinksl_sg" shape="rect" coords="0, 55, 600, 75"><area href="http://x.about.com/sg/r/3412.htm?p=2&amp;ref=fooddrinksl_sg" shape="rect" coords="0, 110, 600, 130"></map><img border="0" src="http://z.about.com/sg/sg.gif?cuni=3412" usemap="#sgmap" width="600" height="160"></td></tr><tr><td colspan="6">&nbsp;</td></tr>
<tr><td colspan="6"><a name="d"><font face="verdana" size="4" color="#cc0000"><b>Top Picks - </b></font></a><a href="http://slclk.about.com/?zi=1/BAO" class="srvb">Fun Gift Ideas</a><span class="snv">
 from your <a href="http://chinesefood.about.com">Chinese Cuisine</a> Guide</span></td></tr><tr><td colspan="6" bgcolor="cc0000"><img height="1" width="1"></td></tr><tr><td colspan="6" class="snv">

So I would need "clk.about.com" etc.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
3  
Regexs are very powerful, so worth learning to use. I don't use Python but regex is very similar from language to language. Check out gskinner.com/RegExr and play around with building a regex yourself, not to difficult after you learn the syntax. – ubiquibacon Mar 3 '11 at 20:12
1  
OH MY GOD DON'T USE REGEX TO PARSE HTML – jathanism Mar 3 '11 at 22:49
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The cleanest way to do it is with cssselect from lxml.html and urlparse. Here is how:

from lxml import html
from urlparse import urlparse
doc = html.fromstring(html_data)
links = doc.cssselect("a")
domains = set([])
for link in links:
    try: href=link.attrib['href']
    except KeyError: continue
    parsed=urlparse(href)
    domains.add(parsed.netloc)
print domains

First you load the html data into the a document object with fromstring. You query the document for links using standard css selectors with cssselect. You traverse the links, grab their urls with .attrib['href'] - and skip them if they don't have any (except - continue). Parse the url into a named tuple with urlparse and put the domain (netloc) into a set. Voila!

Try avoiding regular expressions when you have good libraries online. They are hard for maintenance. Also a no-go for a html parsing.

UPDATE: The href filter suggestion in the comments is very helpful, the code will look like this:

from lxml import html
from urlparse import urlparse
doc = html.fromstring(html_data)
links = doc.cssselect("a[href]")
domains = set([])
for link in links:
    href=link.attrib['href']
    parsed=urlparse(href)
    domains.add(parsed.netloc)
print domains

You don't need the try-catch block since the href filter makes sure you catch only the anchors that have href attribute in them.

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1  
You can even filter <a> elements that have an href attribute with cssselect: doc.cssselect('a[href]') – Simon Sapin Jul 28 '12 at 8:20

You can use HTMLParser from the Python standard library to get to certain parts of the document.

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HTMLParser is the clean way to do it. If you want something quick and dirty, or just want to see what a moderately complex regex looks like, here's an example regex to find href's (off the top of my head, not tested):

r'<a\s+href="\w+://[^/"]+[^"]*">'
share|improve this answer
from lxml import etree
from StringIO import StringIO
from urlparse import urlparse
html = """<tr><td colspan="5"><font face="verdana" size="4" color="#999999"><b>Resource Links - </b></font><span class="snv"><a href="http://clk.about.com/?zi=4/RZ">Get Listed Here</a></span></td><td class="snv" valign="bottom" align="right"><a href="http://sprinks.about.com/faq/index.htm">What Is This?</a></td></tr><tr><td colspan="6" bgcolor="#999999"><img height="1" width="1"></td></tr><tr><td colspan="6"><map name="sgmap"><area href="http://x.about.com/sg/r/3412.htm?p=0&amp;ref=fooddrinksl_sg" shape="rect" coords="0, 0, 600, 20"><area href="http://x.about.com/sg/r/3412.htm?p=1&amp;ref=fooddrinksl_sg" shape="rect" coords="0, 55, 600, 75"><area href="http://x.about.com/sg/r/3412.htm?p=2&amp;ref=fooddrinksl_sg" shape="rect" coords="0, 110, 600, 130"></map><img border="0" src="http://z.about.com/sg/sg.gif?cuni=3412" usemap="#sgmap" width="600" height="160"></td></tr><tr><td colspan="6">&nbsp;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="6"><a name="d"><font face="verdana" size="4" color="#cc0000"><b>Top Picks - </b></font></a><a href="http://slclk.about.com/?zi=1/BAO" class="srvb">Fun Gift Ideas</a><span class="snv"> from your <a href="http://chinesefood.about.com">Chinese Cuisine</a> Guide</span></td></tr><tr><td colspan="6" bgcolor="cc0000"><img height="1" width="1"></td></tr><tr><td colspan="6" class="snv">"""
parser = etree.HTMLParser()
tree = etree.parse(StringIO(html), parser)
r = tree.xpath("//a")
links = []
for i in r:
    try:
        links.append(i.attrib['href'])
    except KeyError:
        pass

for link in links:
    print urlparse(link)    

From hereon the domain can be distinguished as netloc. The xPath is not probably the best here, someone one please suggest an improvement, but should suit your needs.

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Given you always have an http protocol specifier in front of the domains, this should work (txt is your example).

import re
[groups[0] for groups in re.findall(r'http://(\w+(\.\w+){1,})(/\w+)*', txt)]

The pattern for domains is not perfect, though.

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