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I'm creating an application with a service layer (WCF Website) and a Silverlight 4 Client. RIA Services are not an option, so we create intermediary classes to pass back and forth. For the purpose of this question let's assume I'm passing back and forth Tasty Food Objects.

public class FoodData
{
  public int Id { get; set; }
  public string Name { get; set; }
  public Tastyness TastyLevel { get; set; }
}

The EF Model is essentially the same class, a table with three basic fields (the Tastyness is an int that corresponds to our enum Tastyness).

I find myself using this kind of statement a lot when doing Entity Framework queries:

public List<FoodData> GetDeliciousFoods()
{
  var deliciousFoods = entities.Foods
                               .Where(f => f.Tastyness == (int)Tastyness.Delicious)
                               .ToList()  // Necessary? And if so, best performance with List, Array, other?
                               .Select(dFood => dFood.ToFoodData())
                               .ToList();

  return deliciousFoods;
}

Without the .ToList() call I get an exception about LINQ not being able to translate the custom method to a query equivalent, which I understand.

My question is about the call to .ToList() before the .Select(...) with the custom extension to convert our object to the POCO version of the Food object.

Is there a better pattern to do here, or maybe even a better alternative to .ToList() that may be more performant since I don't really require the functionality of the List<..> result.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The problem with using ToList or AsEnumerable is that you materialize the entire entity and pay the cost of fixup. If you want to have the best possible SQL which returns only the needed fields, then you should project directly rather than using .ToFoodData():

var deliciousFoods = entities.Foods
                             .Where(f => f.Tastyness == (int)Tastyness.Delicious)
                             .Select(dFood => new FoodData
                                  {
                                      Id = dFood.Id,
                                      Name = dFood.Name,
                                      TastyLevel = (Tastyness)dFood.Tastyness
                                  });

The cast to enum may be a problem. If so, go through an anonymous type:

var deliciousFoods = entities.Foods
                             .Where(f => f.Tastyness == (int)Tastyness.Delicious)
                             .Select(dFood => new FoodData
                                  {
                                      Id = dFood.Id,
                                      Name = dFood.Name,
                                      TastyLevel = dFood.Tastyness
                                  })
                             .AsEnumerable()
                             .Select(dFood => new FoodData
                                  {
                                      Id = dFood.Id,
                                      Name = dFood.Name,
                                      TastyLevel = (Tastyness)dFood.TastyLevel
                                  });

If you examine the resulting SQL, you'll see it's simpler, and you don't pay the cost of fixing up objects into the ObjectContext.

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1  
Yes. Your first example, with the direct projection, is very tasty indeed. –  Eric King Mar 3 '11 at 23:08
    
Very nice, thats exactly what I was trying to get a better explanation of. In my case, I use all the fields for the object in the Data Transfer Object (FoodData), so the SQL probably isn't improved too much. This info will shape how I query entity collections from now on. –  Jacob Mar 4 '11 at 1:28
    
plus 1 for using AsEnumerable() –  mhand Mar 11 at 21:27

Use AsEnumerable() to turn the query into a regular old LINQ to Objects query without having to create an unneeded List

var deliciousFoods = entities.Foods
                               .Where(f => f.Tastyness == (int)Tastyness.Delicious)
                               .AsEnumerable()
                               .Select(dFood => dFood.ToFoodData())
                               .ToList();

Edit: See http://www.hookedonlinq.com/AsEnumerableOperator.ashx

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Do you have any data to back that up as having better performance, mr. stranger on the internet? ;) –  Jacob Mar 3 '11 at 20:41
    
@Jacob see edit –  pickles Mar 3 '11 at 20:45
    
Seems pretty straight forward. I'd still like to try and do some experiments for large data sets to see the difference in time. –  Jacob Mar 3 '11 at 20:54
    
I don't see any performance issue. The one thing I will say is that the cursor will be kept open longer with AsEnumerable vs ToList. Assuming dFood.ToFoodData doesn't do anything significant, the issue is almost moot. But just for sake of explanation, if each invocation took say 10 sec, then AsEnumerable will take 10 sec in between returning each record vs ToList sending them all at once down from the database. –  Rich Mar 3 '11 at 21:08
    
When I tried using AsEnumerable I noticed I got some intermittent "underlying connection closed" types of exceptions. I think I like the projection idea below better, seems cleaner. –  Jacob Mar 4 '11 at 1:25

The first .ToList() isn't required.

var deliciousFoods = entities.Food

    // Here a lazy-evaluated collection is created (ie, the actual database query
    // has not been run yet)
    .Where(f => f.Tastyness == (int)Tastyness.Delicious)

    // With ToArray, the query is executed and results returned and 
    // instances of Food created.  The database connection
    // can safely be closed at this point.
    // Given the rest of the linq query, this step can be skipped
    // with no performance penalty that I can think of
    .ToArray()

    // Project result set onto new collection.  DB Query executed if
    // not already
    // The above .ToArray() should make no difference here other
    // than an extra function call an iteration over the result set
    .Select(dFood => dFood.ToFoodData())

    // This one might not be needed, see below
    .ToList();

Do you require that the result set be a List<>? Or would just an IEnumerable or ICollection be adequate? If so, then the last .ToList() may not be needed.

You asked about performance? How many instances do you expect to be returned per query? If it's relatively few, then .ToList() or .ToArray(), or others don't make any meaningful difference. It's more about what kind of functionality do you need to expose? If the returned object needs to be indexable, addable, and have the other properties of List, that's okay. But, if all you're doing is iterating over the returned collection, don't expose what isn't needed.

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ToArray is more costly than ToList since the implementation first fills up a list and then creates an array from the list. –  mhand Mar 11 at 21:28

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