Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I can't seem to figure this out... I have a string say, "a\\nb" and I want this to become "a\nb". I've tried all the following and none seem to work;

>>> a
'a\\nb'
>>> a.replace("\\","\")
  File "<stdin>", line 1
    a.replace("\\","\")
                      ^
SyntaxError: EOL while scanning string literal
>>> a.replace("\\",r"\")
  File "<stdin>", line 1
    a.replace("\\",r"\")
                       ^
SyntaxError: EOL while scanning string literal
>>> a.replace("\\",r"\\")
'a\\\\nb'
>>> a.replace("\\","\\")
'a\\nb'

I really don't understand why the last one works, because this works fine:

>>> a.replace("\\","%")
'a%nb'

Is there something I'm missing here?

EDIT I understand that \ is an escape character. What I'm trying to do here is turn all \\n \\t etc. into \n \t etc. and replace doesn't seem to be working the way I imagined it would.

>>> a = "a\\nb"
>>> b = "a\nb"
>>> print a
a\nb
>>> print b
a
b
>>> a.replace("\\","\\")
'a\\nb'
>>> a.replace("\\\\","\\")
'a\\nb'

I want string a to look like string b. But replace isn't replacing slashes like I thought it would.

share|improve this question
1  
Your original string, a = 'a\\nb' does not actually have two '\' characters, the first one is an escape for the latter. If you do, print a, you'll see that you actually have only one '\' character. –  Santa Mar 3 '11 at 21:44

6 Answers 6

up vote 16 down vote accepted

There is no reason to use replace for this, Python comes with batteries included.

What you have is a encoded string (using the string_escape encoding) and you want to decode it:

>>> s = r"Escaped\nNewline"
>>> print s
Escaped\nNewline
>>> s.decode('string_escape')
'Escaped\nNewline'
>>> print s.decode('string_escape')
Escaped
Newline
>>> "a\\nb".decode('string_escape')
'a\nb'
share|improve this answer
2  
I think the equivalent of this for Python 3 is: bytes(s, 'utf-8').decode("unicode_escape") –  Jonathan Hartley May 8 '11 at 21:56
    
Alternatively in Python 3: 'a\\nb'.encode().decode('unicode_escape') –  Mike Chamberlain Feb 22 '12 at 14:01

You are missing, that \ is the escape character.

Look here: http://docs.python.org/reference/lexical_analysis.html at 2.4.1 "Escape Sequence"

Most importantly \n is a newline character. And \\ is an escaped escape character :D

>>> a = 'a\\\\nb'
>>> a
'a\\\\nb'
>>> print a
a\\nb
>>> a.replace('\\\\', '\\')
'a\\nb'
>>> print a.replace('\\\\', '\\')
a\nb
share|improve this answer

Your original string, a = 'a\\nb' does not actually have two '\' characters, the first one is an escape for the latter. If you do, print a, you'll see that you actually have only one '\' character.

>>> a = 'a\\nb'
>>> print a
a\nb

If, however, what you mean is to interpret the '\n' as a newline character, without escaping the slash, then:

>>> b = a.replace('\\n', '\n')
>>> b
'a\nb'
>>> print b
a
b
share|improve this answer
    
This worked thanks! Part of the issue was that I was confusing myself by thinking that \\n was 3 characters instead of just 2. –  kand Mar 3 '11 at 23:22

It's because, even in "raw" strings (=strings with an r before the starting quote(s)), an unescaped escape character cannot be the last character in the string. This should work instead:

'\\ '[0]
share|improve this answer
    
Why not '\\'? It's valid. –  tzot Mar 26 '11 at 22:35

In Python string literals, backslash is an escape character. This is also true when the interactive prompt shows you the value of a string. It will give you the literal code representation of the string. Use the print statement to see what the string actually looks like.

This example shows the difference:

>>> '\\'
'\\'
>>> print '\\'
\
share|improve this answer
r'a\\nb'.replace('\\\\', '\\')

or

'a\nb'.replace('\n', '\\n')
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.