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I am new to boost and c++ and is attempting to serialize an object to binary and then unserialize it.

I'm using the classes from the example in: http://en.highscore.de/cpp/boost/serialization.html

So suppose this is the class I am trying to serialize:

class person 
{ 
public: 
  person() { } 

  person(int age) : age_(age) {  } 

  int age() const { return age_; } 

private:
  friend class boost::serialization::access;

  template <typename Archive>
  void serialize(Archive &ar, const unsigned int version)
  {
    ar & age_;
  }

  int age_;
}; 

This is the serialization code:

const char * save(Object ss)
{
    boost::archive::binary_oarchive oa(ss);
    person p(31);
    oa << p;

    return ss.str().data();
}

This is the unserialization code:

void load(const char * str)
    {

        stringstream s;
        s << str;

        boost::archive::binary_iarchive ia(s);
        person p;
        ia >> p;
        std::cout << p.age() << std::endl;

    }

When I attempt to run this code, I receive this error:

terminate called after throwing an instance of 'boost::archive::archive_exception'
  what():  stream error

Which brings me to ask, is there a proper way of doing this?

Thanks, much appreciated.

EDIT: This version works:

This is the serialization code:

string save()
{
    boost::archive::binary_oarchive oa(ss);
    person p(31);
    oa << p;

    return ss.str();
}

This is the unserialization code:

void load(string str)
    {

        stringstream s;
        s << str;

        boost::archive::binary_iarchive ia(s);
        person p;
        ia >> p;
        std::cout << p.age() << std::endl;

    }

EDIT2: This version does not work. Would appreciate comments on a fix. Thanks.

void Serialization::save()
{
    stringstream ss;
    {
        boost::archive::binary_oarchive oa(ss);
        person p(31);
        oa << p;
     }


        const char * temp1 = ss.str().data();

        stringstream s;
        s << temp1;

        cout << "UNSERIALIZING\n";
        boost::archive::binary_iarchive ia(s);
        person p1;
        ia >> p1;
        std::cout << p1.age() << std::endl;

}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Using binary archives with std::stringstream is allowed, as any character can be stored in a std::stringstream/std::string.

The problem is passing around the resulting data as a null terminated C-string, as binary data is highly likely to have embedded nulls thus upon load your data will be truncated. Additionally, your save function is returning data pointing into a destroyed object, invoking undefined behavior.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the comment. Can you elaborate on "data pointing into a destroyed object"? I assumed the data is destroyed when the function ends. So I returned the const char * data before the function ended and stored it in a variable outside save() then passed it into load(). I'm guessing my logic is wrong since the program errors. –  user459811 Mar 4 '11 at 0:39
1  
The pointer returned by std::string::data() is only valid until the string is modified or destroyed. The string returned by std::stringstream::str() is destroyed upon completion of the return statement. Thus whoever is calling your save function will get a pointer to invalid data 100% of the time. –  ildjarn Mar 4 '11 at 0:43
    
Ah I see. Can you recommend a better approach or a way of passing around the data without embedding nulls? –  user459811 Mar 4 '11 at 0:51
1  
@user459811 : Binary data will have embedded nulls. The key point is to pass around data with a data structure that wont truncate the data when there are embedded nulls. std::vector<char> is the obvious candidate, though technically std::string will work as well as long as you don't use its data or c_str methods. –  ildjarn Mar 4 '11 at 0:55
1  
@user459811 : std::string::size() is accurate regardless of embedded nulls, quite the same as std::vector<unsigned char>::size(). In any case, if you really want to, given std::string str, you can construct a std::vector<unsigned char> as follows: std::vector<unsigned char> vec(str.begin(), str.end());. –  ildjarn Mar 7 '11 at 20:01

You can't use binary_iarchive/binary_oarchive with stringstream, because some 'binary' characters are NOT allowed inside a 'string'. If you want use stringstream, you need 'text_iarchive/text_oarchive' or 'xml_iarchive/xml_oarchive'.

With 'binary_{io}archive' (performance) you must use a 'fstream'.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the comment. I've edited my code such that it no longer uses string but const char * instead so that I can still use a stringstream. However, it is still giving me errors. Any point in the right direction is much appreciated. Thanks. –  user459811 Mar 4 '11 at 0:06
5  
"Binary" characters are indeed allowed inside std::strings. Say it with me -- a char is a char is a char, there is no difference between 'binary' and 'text' other than context. –  ildjarn Mar 4 '11 at 0:32

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