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In git, if I have a couple of hunks from the same file staged in my index, how can I interactively unstage one of them?

Is there any alternative to unstaging the entire file, and then re-staging the hunks I want to keep, or manually undoing the changes to the working copy, and then interactively adding those undone changes?

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2 Answers

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Try git reset --patch filename; should do the opposite of git add --patch, according to the documentation. The short form -p also works for both commands.

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I don't think my version has it (it's 1.6.3.3), but this looks like the correct answer. –  Andrew Grimm Mar 4 '11 at 0:50
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In that case (and assuming that you cannot upgrade for some reason), I suggest that you use git stash save --keep-index to save and reset your current working copy changes. Then, you can reset your file and undo the changes you don't want. If you copy the file to some temporary location first, you can use diff to save the changes you undo. Then, you can add the file back again (no need for an interactive add since you stashed away the other changes you weren't interested in). Use git stash pop to get back the old changes, and diff to apply the changes you undid. Quite cumbersome... :-( –  Aasmund Eldhuset Mar 4 '11 at 1:02
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GitX has a nice UI for unstaging chunks of a file: enter image description here

The official client hasn't been maintained in a while, but a fork over at GitHub with more features is popular in some circles. (blog post about it)

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For the Windows users out there, Git Extensions has a similarly nice UI. –  Aasmund Eldhuset Mar 4 '11 at 1:04
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So does the built in git gui, except I'm not sure I'd use the word "nice" ;) –  MatrixFrog Mar 4 '11 at 2:24
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