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I'll Post, HELLO, WORLD

Expecting

HELLO,6
H
E
L
L
O
,
WORLD5
W
O
R
L
D

Instead I get

HELLO,6
H
E
L
L
O
,

WORLD5

There 2nd word will not spell?

$name = $_POST['engname'];
$convert = array_combine($letters, $jap);

function get_num_of_names($name) {
    $name = explode(" ",  $name);
        $name_mainlen = count($name);


        for($i=0; $i <= $name_mainlen + 1; $i++) {
            echo $name[$i];
            $name[$i] = str_split($name[$i]);
            $namelen = count($name[$i]);
            echo $namelen . '<br/>';

            function spellname($x, $namelen) {
                for($i=0; $i <= $namelen; $i++) {
                    echo $x[$i] . '<br/>';
                }   
            }
            spellname($name[$i], $namelen);
        }


}
get_num_of_names($name);
share|improve this question
    
add this to the bottom your script.. check your variables & arrays... print_r(get_defined_vars()); post your output... –  Peter Mar 4 '11 at 0:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You're defining a function in a loop. Your script should implode with a Function 'spellname' already defined error, if you'd activate error reporting.

A function is defined when it is encountered. If you place it in a loop, it will be defined on each iteration. Since you can't define two functions with the same name, your script aborts with a fatal error.

Apart from that, there are much easier ways to do what you want to do:

$str = 'Hello World';
$words = explode(' ', $str);
$output = array();
foreach ($words as $word) {
    $output[] = join('<br />', str_split($word));
}
echo join('<br /><br />', $output);

Or, as a one-liner:

echo join('<br /><br />', array_map(create_function('$a', 'return join("<br />", str_split($a));'), explode(' ', $str)));

Or, even shorter with different approach (regards to @Long Ears):

echo join('<br />', str_replace(' ', '', str_split($str)));
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, just noticed that my revised code doesn't adhere 100% to the "spec", as it doesn't print the entire word and its length before breaking it down, and it's also not using commas. I'll leave that as an exercise to the OP. :) –  deceze Mar 4 '11 at 1:10
    
A much simpler but equivalent one-liner: echo join('<br />', str_replace(' ', '', str_split($str))); –  Long Ears Mar 4 '11 at 2:41
    
And slightly less horrid than create_function(), how about a regex using a conditional sub-pattern and a non-matching assertion to capture a string which doesn't exist in the subject ;) echo preg_replace('#(?(?= )(?!(<br />))|).#', '$0<br />$2', $str); –  Long Ears Mar 4 '11 at 2:44
    
The reason why I did it the way I was doing it, is so I can use the letters as an arrays key and replace it with the arrays value. –  Aaron Mar 4 '11 at 2:54
    
@Long create_function ain't pretty, but it works and is more comprehensible than that regex. ;-) I have to admit your str_replace approach is clever, but you won't be able to get the same results as the OP. Neither does my code right now, but it's extensible. –  deceze Mar 4 '11 at 3:34

You're defining the same function twice which should result in a noticable error, so ensure that error_reporting is E_ALL and display_errors is on in your php.ini.

In this case however you don't need the function, you can just loop $name instead of $x.

share|improve this answer
    
I finnally turned display_errors on, and wow so many errors, but it's sort of fun to debug and watch each error disappear! Thank you. –  Aaron Mar 4 '11 at 13:20

dude, there is a function in your for loop!!! wtf???

would be the reply I would give if one of my friends would come to me with this code(that would be an unlikely scenerio though). basicly you shouldn't do that.

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I was going to downvote you for douche-factor, then I read the second paragraph and wanted to upvote you for the laugh. Net 0 votes (really because Deceze answer hit it spot-on) but I appreciated your response. –  Farray Mar 4 '11 at 1:11

Further to other comments your function is called get_num_of_names, but would be better called print_names_and_their_letters as getting the number of names is only a tiny part of the function.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for refreshing my memory on how to name function names. –  Aaron Mar 4 '11 at 13:19

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