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Hi I have files called MyCode.h and MyCode.cpp

In MyCode.h I have declared

enum MyEnum {Something = 0, SomethingElse = 1};

class MyClass {

MyEnum enumInstance;
void Foo();

}; 

Then in MyCode.cpp:

#include "MyCode.h"

void MyClass::Foo() {
    enumInstance = MyEnum::SomethingElse;
}

but when compiling with g++ I get the error 'MyEnum' is not a class or namespace...

(works fine in MS VS2010 but not linux g++)

Any ideas? Thanks Thomas

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1  
Note: in your .cpp file, if you wanted to provide an implementation for MyClass::foo, the signature would be void MyClass::Foo() { ... }. You are missing the MyClass:: bit. –  phooji Mar 4 '11 at 1:12
    
MyCode.h != MyClass.h ... Doubt that helps though :P –  Daniel Mar 4 '11 at 1:37

3 Answers 3

Scoped enums will not exist until C++0x. For the time being, your code should be

enumInstance = SomethingElse;

You can create an artificial scoped enum by putting the enum's definition inside its own namespace or struct.

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The syntax MyEnum::SomethingElse is a Microsoft extension. It happens to be one I like, but it's not Standard C++. enum values are added to the surrounding namespace:

 // header
 enum MyEnum {Something = 0, SomethingElse = 1};

 class MyClass {

 MyEnum enumInstance;
 void Foo();

 }

 // implementation
 #include "MyClass.h"

 void Foo() {
     enumInstance = SomethingElse;
 }
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3  
Luckily, C++0x will add that capacity, one I think was lacking for quite some time and sorely needed. –  Sion Sheevok Mar 4 '11 at 1:36
    
Thanks. It drove me crazy. I couldn't figure out why my enums would resolve in one XCode project and not in the other. O.o Though I still don't have an answer as to why this happened, I know the fix. If someone ventures a guess, I'd be more than happy to know.. –  JAnderton Jul 1 '13 at 15:28

Indeed, C++0x allows that feature. I could enable it successfully in gcc using this command line flag: -std=c++0x

This was with gcc version 4.4.5

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