Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been working on this for days and have gotten absolutely nowhere. We have made a simple simulation where there are 2 types of Creatures: Fox and Tux. Tux moves around randomly and I'm supposed to implement a method so that Fox goes after the closest Tux. I posted the creature class instead of Tux because he doesn't have a move() method that overrides Creature. Only Fox will for now.

My reasoning for the code in Fox's move method: Create an ArrayList of the closest Tux's (if their distance is less than 10). Sort the list and put the Tux with the least distance into a Creature object. Get that Creature objects angle and move Fox based on that angle. So far nothing happens. The Fox's simply all go to the bottom of the Room and face south and never move.

Note: The distance method used is based on pythagoras. The code is trivial for this solution. Just know that, for example, "this.distance(c)" returns the distance between these 2 objects.

Fox class:

import env3d.EnvObject;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collections;

public class Fox extends Creature
{
    private double rand = 0;
    private double randangle = 0;
    private int frame = 0;
    private double angle = 0;

    private ArrayList<Creature> neighbours;

    public Fox(double x, double y, double z)
    {
        super(x, y, z);

        // Must use the mutator as the fields have private access
        // in the parent class
        setTexture("models/fox/fox.png");
        setModel("models/fox/fox.obj");

        neighbours = new ArrayList<Creature>();
    } 

    public void move(ArrayList<Creature> creatures, ArrayList<Creature> dead_creatures)
    {  
        // Move the object based on it's closest neighbour
        for (Creature c : creatures) {
            // Creates a list of closest Tux
            ArrayList<Creature> neighbours = new ArrayList<Creature>();
            if (this.distance(c) < 4 && c instanceof Tux) {
                neighbours.add(c);
            }

            // sorting algortihm
            if (neighbours.size() > 0) {
                Creature minc = neighbours.get(0);
                for (int i = 1; i < neighbours.size(); i++) {
                    if (this.distance(neighbours.get(i)) < this.distance(minc) ) {
                        minc = neighbours.get(i);
                    }
                    // angle that Fox should go to catch Tux
                    angle = Math.toDegrees(Math.atan2(this.getZ()-minc.getZ(),this.getX()-minc.getX()))+90;
                }
            }

            // Move Fox based on it's closest neighbour's angle
            setX(getX()+(Math.sin(Math.toRadians(angle))));
            setZ(getZ()+(Math.cos(Math.toRadians(angle))));
        }

        // Makes sure object stays in the dimensions of the room
        if (getX() < getScale()) setX(getScale());
        if (getX() > 50-getScale()) setX(50 - getScale());
        if (getZ() < getScale()) setZ(getScale());
        if (getZ() > 50-getScale()) setZ(50 - getScale());

        // The move method now handles collision detection
        for (Creature c : creatures) {
            if (c.distance(this) < c.getScale()+this.getScale() && c instanceof Tux) {
                dead_creatures.add(c);
            }
        }
    }        
}

Tux class:

import env3d.EnvObject;
import java.util.ArrayList;

abstract public class Creature extends EnvObject
{
    private double rand = 0;
    private double randangle = 0;
    private int frame = 0;
    /**
     * Constructor for objects of class Creature
     */
    public Creature(double x, double y, double z)
    {
        setX(x);
        setY(y);
        setZ(z);
        setScale(1);

    }

    protected void generateRand()
    {
        rand = Math.random();
    }

    protected void generateRandAngle()
    {
        randangle = Math.random()*120;
    }

    public void move(ArrayList<Creature> creatures, ArrayList<Creature> dead_creatures)
    {   
        if (frame == 10) {
            generateRand();
            generateRandAngle();
            if (rand < 0.5){
                setRotateY(getRotateY()-randangle);
            } else if (rand < 1) {
                setRotateY(getRotateY()+randangle);
            }
            frame = 0;
        }

        setX(getX()+(Math.sin(Math.toRadians(getRotateY()))*0.2));
        setZ(getZ()+(Math.cos(Math.toRadians(getRotateY()))*0.2));

        if (getX() < getScale()) setX(getScale());
        if (getX() > 50-getScale()) setX(50 - getScale());
        if (getZ() < getScale()) setZ(getScale());
        if (getZ() > 50-getScale()) setZ(50 - getScale());

        // The move method now handles collision detection
        if (this instanceof Fox) {
            for (Creature c : creatures) {
                if (c.distance(this) < c.getScale()+this.getScale() && c instanceof Tux) {
                    dead_creatures.add(c);
                }
            }
        }

        frame++;
    }        
}

Game class:

import env3d.Env;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import env3d.EnvApplet;

/**
 * A predator and prey simulation.  Fox is the predator and Tux is the prey.
 */
public class Game extends EnvApplet
{
    private Env env;    
    private boolean finished;
    private boolean move; 

    private ArrayList<Creature> creatures;

    /**
     * Constructor for the Game class. It sets up the foxes and tuxes.
     */
    public Game()
    {
        // we use a separate ArrayList to keep track of each animal. 
        // our room is 50 x 50.
        creatures = new ArrayList<Creature>();
        for (int i = 0; i < 55; i++) {
            if (i < 5) {
                creatures.add(new Fox((int)(Math.random()*48)+1, 1, (int)(Math.random()*48)+1));        
            } else {
                creatures.add(new Tux((int)(Math.random()*48)+1, 1, (int)(Math.random()*48)+1));
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     * Play the game
     */
    public void play()
    {

        finished = false;

        // Create the new environment.  Must be done in the same
        // method as the game loop
        env = new Env();

        // Make the room 50 x 50.
        env.setRoom(new Room());

        // Add all the animals into to the environment for display
        for (Creature c : creatures) {
            env.addObject(c);
        }

        // Sets up the camera
        env.setCameraXYZ(25, 50, 55);
        env.setCameraPitch(-63);

        // Turn off the default controls
        env.setDefaultControl(false);

        // A list to keep track of dead tuxes.
        ArrayList<Creature> dead_creatures = new ArrayList<Creature>();

        // The main game loop
        while (!finished) {            

            if (env.getKey() == 1)  {
                finished = true;
             }

            // Move each fox and tux.
            for (Creature c : creatures) {
                c.move(creatures, dead_creatures);
            }

            // Clean up of the dead tuxes.
            for (Creature c : dead_creatures) {
                env.removeObject(c);
                creatures.remove(c);
            }
            // we clear the ArrayList for the next loop.  We could create a new one 
            // every loop but that would be very inefficient.
            dead_creatures.clear();

            // Update display
            env.advanceOneFrame();
        }

        // Just a little clean up
        env.exit();
    }


    /**
     * Main method to launch the program.
     */
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        (new Game()).play();
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
It's simple: Penguins live in Antarctica. The foxes know this and are trying to go south to head them off. –  ithcy Mar 4 '11 at 2:27
    
@Bobby - I hope you get a response. This is an interesting one. –  Jared Farrish Mar 4 '11 at 2:27
    
@itchy - Well, it was nice to have a chuckle in all this frustration. –  Bobby Williams Mar 4 '11 at 2:30
    
...Seriously, you might want to look into what I think are called pursuit-evasion algorithms. When I was a kid, a friend and I wrote something almost identical to this program, except we used sharks chasing swimmers. We had a blast and learned a ton about programming, game theory, algorithms, AI, etc. etc. Now I write insurance software :| You're doing the fun kind of programming, try to take a step back and don't let it frustrate you too much. –  ithcy Mar 4 '11 at 2:35
1  
The reason many instructors do this is because game programming can expose you to a really wide range of computer science-related topics in the scope of a single project. I don't know if any other programming specialty provides this kind of range. But it's also meant to make it fun to learn these things, and the professor can make or break it. There's nothing worse than hitting that mental wall and losing all your momentum. I'm sure someone here will provide an answer and get you going again. Good luck. –  ithcy Mar 4 '11 at 2:49
show 1 more comment

1 Answer

if (this.distance(c) < 4 && c instanceof Tux) {
        neighbours.add(c);
    }

Combined with

Tux's (if their distance is less than 10)

from your intro... firstly, the two don't say the same. Secondly, for debug purposes, why do you care about the distance?

creatures.add(new Fox((int)(Math.random()*48)+1, 1, (int)(Math.random()*48)+1));

creatures.add(new Tux((int)(Math.random()*48)+1, 1, (int)(Math.random()*48)+1));

As a general rule, I usually try to avoid Math.random stuff when debugging. There is a chance none of the tuxs are spawning within 4 units distance of any fox. This would cause them to follow a default path.

Try placing a Fox and a Tux next to each other, manually - if it works the algorithm is good.

i.e.

creatures.add(new Fox(5, 1, 5);

creatures.add(new Tux(5, 1, 4);

Also, adding a breakpoint inside

if (neighbours.size() > 0) {
        Creature minc = neighbours.get(0); // Breakpoint here

would tell you if it's detecting any tuxs.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm, very interesting. I implement an if-statement so that if Fox has no neighbours it moves in the same fashion as a Tux (same code). They simply all go straight to the bottom of the room. –  Bobby Williams Mar 4 '11 at 2:46
    
@bobby-williams, that's perfectly fine, but if the x spacing is still >= 4 when they all reach the bottom, they still won't head towards each other. –  chrisb Mar 4 '11 at 3:04
    
I finally emailed my prof and asked for help. He said I didn't need a sorting algorithm. He gave me: if (c instanceof Tux) { if (this.distance(c) < minDist) { minDist = this.distance(c); closestTux = c; } } This the Fox's the closest Tux. Then I take the closest Tux (closestTux) and calculate an angle: double angle = Math.toDegrees(Math.atan2(this.getZ()-closestTux.getZ(),this.getX()-closestTux.g‌​etX()))+90; –  Bobby Williams Mar 4 '11 at 4:27
    
Then set the angle of Fox to the opposite of that angle (?) and use that in his move methiod: this.setRotateY(this.getRotateY()+angle); this.setX(this.getX()+(Math.sin(Math.toRadians(getRotateY()))*0.2)); this.setZ(this.getZ()+(Math.cos(Math.toRadians(getRotateY()))*0.2)); I feel like I'm so close and almost in tears because I've been working on this for hours, days even. I'll stick to pure math after this class. –  Bobby Williams Mar 4 '11 at 4:31
    
Ok. I solved it. –  Bobby Williams Mar 4 '11 at 4:41
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.