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Is there any way to stop a script after it has executed a particular amount of time?

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2 Answers

I have the same question. My current approach looks like this (and does not work as expected...):

// jruby-complete-1.6.0.RC2.jar
import org.jruby.Ruby;

class JRubyStop {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
        final Ruby jruby = Ruby.newInstance();
        Thread jrubyThread = new Thread() {
            public void run() {
                String scriptlet = "for i in 0..100; puts i; sleep(1); end";
                jruby.evalScriptlet(scriptlet);
            }
        };
        jrubyThread.start();
        Thread.sleep(5000);
        System.out.println("interrupt!");
        jrubyThread.interrupt();
        System.out.println("interrupted?!");
    }
}

After the output of "interrupted?!" the thread still runs until the scriptlet ends.

Edit: Converted Groovy example into a Java SSCCE (http://sscce.org/).

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After the output of "interrupted?!" the thread still runs until the scriptlet ends. If your's is a simple application, you can try using Thread.stop() instead of Thread.interrupt() –  RubyDosa Mar 7 '11 at 4:40
    
Thanks, it worked. I accually was reluctant to use Thread.stop() since it is deprecated. I've to test this a bit more, because I have to call several Java methods with Ruby. –  Benjamin Gudehus Mar 7 '11 at 9:46
    
I also found jira.codehaus.org/browse/JRUBY-4135 where some JRuby guys talk about issues with interrupting threads. –  Benjamin Gudehus Mar 7 '11 at 9:48
    
Hey, thanks for the link. I'll let you know if this works. cheers! –  RubyDosa Mar 7 '11 at 10:19
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This is a rather vaguely defined question. Here are a few ideas that come to mind:

  1. Use a shell as the control process. Start the JRuby script, send it into the background, sleep for a fixed amount of time, then kill $!.
  2. At the beginning of your JRuby script, create a thread that sleeps for a fixed amount of time, and then kill the entire script.
  3. If you're using an embedded JRuby, you can use Java's threads to do exactly what you want.
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If you're using an embedded JRuby, you can use Java's threads to do exactly what you want. Yes, I'm using it inside jvm. but how do i stop it? –  RubyDosa Mar 7 '11 at 6:41
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