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Is following code the safe way to remove a element in the Hashtable?

   Enumeration keys = siCache.keys();  //siCache is Hashtable

    while(keys.hasMoreElements())
    {
        String k = (String) keys.nextElement();
        Object v = siCache.get(k);

       if(condition) siCache.remove(k);

    }
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I don't see why the elements are ever cast to a String. HashTable.remove expects the key itself, not its toString. if your condition needs the String for some reason thats fine, but dont use ity as arghument to HashTable.remove –  jon_darkstar Mar 4 '11 at 6:18
    
Seems like. Is there any particular reason you though this is not safe? –  Ravi Gummadi Mar 4 '11 at 6:21
1  
@Jon_darkstar Q: what does toString() have to do with casting to String? A: Nothing. –  EJP Mar 4 '11 at 6:36
    
right, good point. I dont use much java lately. Still, my question concerning the purpose of casting remains even if that detail was off –  jon_darkstar Mar 4 '11 at 6:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Removing an element from a Hashtable while enumerating the keys is potentially risky. Here's what the javadoc says:

"Thus, in the face of concurrent modification, the iterator fails quickly and cleanly, rather than risking arbitrary, non-deterministic behavior at an undetermined time in the future. The Enumerations returned by Hashtable's keys and elements methods are not fail-fast."

The implication is clear: arbitrary, non-deterministic behaviour is possible if you do that.

Solutions:

  • If you are using J2SE, use keySet(). Or better still, don't Use Hashtable.
  • If you are using J2ME, build a list of keys to be removed, and remove them later ... or pray hard :-).
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Use the Iterator of the entry set, the key set, or the value set, and call Iterator.remove().

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1  
No, there is another safe technique: using the iterator of the key set and its remove() method. :) –  rlibby Mar 4 '11 at 6:53
    
care to provide an complete example? I am new to java. Thanks –  pierr Mar 4 '11 at 7:35
    
Another safe technique: using the iterator of the VALUE and its remove() method. :) –  Timmos May 6 '13 at 15:04

There's a distinct difference between using...

Enumeration keys = siCache.keys();

and using...

Iterator iterator = siCache.entrySet().iterator()

Option 1 will not throw a ConcurrentModificationException when you remove elements in the collection whilst iterating, whereas option 2 will.

As for why... I believe that when you create the keys Enumeration in your example it's a literal copy of the tables key set, which is not kept in sync with modifications to the table itself.

This may or may not be an issue for you. If the table is used concurrently though you may want to switch to using the collections iterators.

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It is safe. But what made you think it may not??

tested with the following code.

public static void main(String[] args) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub

        Hashtable siCache = new Hashtable();
        siCache.put("key", "value");
        siCache.put("key1", "value1");
        Enumeration keys = siCache.keys();  //siCache is Hashtable

        while(keys.hasMoreElements())
        {
            String k = (String) keys.nextElement();
            Object v = siCache.get(k);

           if(true) siCache.remove(k);

        }
        System.out.println(siCache.size());
    }

output : 0

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1  
No, it is not safe. –  EJP Mar 4 '11 at 6:37
    
And the example doesn't prove anything either. –  Stephen C Mar 4 '11 at 7:03

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