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How do I turn this:

first_array = [
  {:count=>nil, :date=>"Jan 31"},
  {:count=>nil, :date=>"Feb 01"},
  {:count=>nil, :date=>"Feb 02"},
  {:count=>nil, :date=>"Feb 03"},
  {:count=>nil, :date=>"Feb 04"},
  {:count=>nil, :date=>"Feb 05"}
]

second_array = [
  {:count=>12, :date=>"Feb 01"},
  {:count=>2, :date=>"Feb 02"},
  {:count=>2, :date=>"Feb 05"}
]

Into this:

result = [
  {:count=>nil, :date=>"Jan 31"},
  {:count=>12, :date=>"Feb 01"},
  {:count=>2, :date=>"Feb 02"},
  {:count=>nil, :date=>"Feb 03"},
  {:count=>nil, :date=>"Feb 04"},
  {:count=>2, :date=>"Feb 05"}
]

I have found similar questions on SO, but none were as simple as this one. There's probably a method/block-combination I should use I don't know of.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted
result_array = first_array.map do |first_hash| 
  second_array.each do |second_hash|
    if first_hash[:date] == second_hash[:date]
      first_hash[:count] = second_hash[:count]
      break
    end
  end
  first_hash
end
share|improve this answer

TL;DR

Use each_with_object enumerable:

first_array.each_with_object(second_array){ |e,a| a << e if a.none?{ |i| i[:date] == e[:date] } }

Long answe:r

One approach I find useful is each_with_object enumerable. The whole method can be written like that:

first_array.each_with_object(second_array){ |e,a| a << e if a.none?{ |i| i[:date] == e[:date] } }

irb(main):025:0> pp first_array.each_with_object(second_array){ |e,a| a << e if a.none?{ |i| i[:date] == e[:date] } }
[{:count=>12, :date=>"Feb 01"},
 {:count=>2, :date=>"Feb 02"},
 {:count=>2, :date=>"Feb 05"},
 {:count=>nil, :date=>"Jan 31"},
 {:count=>nil, :date=>"Feb 03"},
 {:count=>nil, :date=>"Feb 04"}]

Such approach would also work when we need a comparison along multiple values, e.g. a.none?{ |i| i[:date] == e[:date] and i[:location] == e[:location] }

When array elements are hashes with only two keys and one of the keys is unique a conversion of an array to hash is another solution. We first convert both arrays to hashes, then merge the first one with the second one and then convert it back to an array of hashes.

def array_of_hashed_dates_to_hash(a_of_h); a_of_h.each_with_object({}){ |e,h| h[e[:date]] = e[:count] }; end

array_of_hashed_dates_to_hash(first_array).merge(array_of_hashed_dates_to_hash(second_array)).map{|e| {date: e.first, count: e.last}}

irb(main):039:0> pp array_of_hashed_dates_to_hash(first_array).merge(array_of_hashed_dates_to_hash(second_array)).map{|e| {date: e.first, count: e.last}}
[{:date=>"Jan 31", :count=>nil},
 {:date=>"Feb 01", :count=>12},
 {:date=>"Feb 02", :count=>2},
 {:date=>"Feb 03", :count=>nil},
 {:date=>"Feb 04", :count=>nil},
 {:date=>"Feb 05", :count=>2}]

First method seems to be more efficient, though:

#!/usr/bin/ruby -Ku

require 'benchmark'

first_array = [
  {:count=>nil, :date=>"Jan 31"},
  {:count=>nil, :date=>"Feb 01"},
  {:count=>nil, :date=>"Feb 02"},
  {:count=>nil, :date=>"Feb 03"},
  {:count=>nil, :date=>"Feb 04"},
  {:count=>nil, :date=>"Feb 05"}
]

second_array = [
  {:count=>12, :date=>"Feb 01"},
  {:count=>2, :date=>"Feb 02"},
  {:count=>2, :date=>"Feb 05"}
]

n = 1000

def array_of_hashed_dates_to_hash(a_of_h)
  a_of_h.each_with_object({}){ |e,h| h[e[:date]] = e[:count] }
end

Benchmark.bm(20) do |x| 
  x.report("Compare by Hash value (each_with_object)") do
    n.times do 
      first_array.each_with_object(second_array){ |e,a| a << e if a.none?{ |i| i[:date] == e[:date] } } 
    end 
  end
  x.report("Convert to Hashes and merge") do
    n.times do
      first_array_hash = array_of_hashed_dates_to_hash(first_array)
      second_array_hash = array_of_hashed_dates_to_hash(second_array)
      first_array_hash.merge(second_array_hash).map{|e| {date: e.first, count: e.last}} 
    end
  end
end


                                            user     system      total        real
Compare by Hash value (each_with_object)  0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.008223)
Convert to Hashes and merge               0.020000   0.000000   0.020000 (  0.012077)
share|improve this answer

This does what you need:

result = first_array.map do |first_hash|
  c = second_array.select do |second_hash|
    second_hash[:date] == first_hash[:date]
  end
  if c.empty?
    first_hash
  else
    c.first
  end
end

N.B.: Here I'm assuming that first_array has always hashes with nil :count while second_array doesn't, as in your example.

share|improve this answer

my suggestion is to use the :date as a key of an hash and the :count as its value. if all you need it counting on a date it will be better to have something like:

result_hash = { "Jan 31" => nil, "Feb 01" => 12, ...}

btw if the output required is that one, i suggest this solution:

all = first_array + second_array

result_hash = {}
all.each do |x|
   result_hash[x[:date]] = x[:count]
end

result = []
result_hash.each_pair do |x, y|
   result << {:count => y, :date => x}
end
share|improve this answer

This solution will give the precedence to non nil values


def hash_merge(h1, h2)
  h3 = {}
  h1.each do |k,v|
    h3[k] = h1[k].eql?(h2[k]) ? v : (h1[k].nil? ? h2[k] : h1[k])
  end
  return h3
end

result = []
first_array.each do |h1|
  h2 = {}
  second_array.each do |h|
    if h1[:date].eql?(h[:date])
      h2 = h
      break
    end
  end
  result.push hash_merge(h1, h2)
end
p result

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