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My STL is a bit rusty, so forgive me for asking a possibly trivial question. Consider the following piece of code:

map<int,int> m;
...
for (auto itr = m.begin(); itr != m.end(); ++itr) {
    if (itr->second == 0) {
        m.erase(itr);
    }
}

The question is: Is it safe to erase elements while looping over the map?

share|improve this question
1  
On second thought, I probably should use something like remove_if. However, I am still interested in the answer to the question. – Petter Mar 4 '11 at 9:02
    
I don't get it - why do you need a loop for this? a map can only ever contain a single key with the value 0. Hence a find and then if found, erase of that iterator should do the trick! – Nim Mar 4 '11 at 9:17
    
Nim, my example was a bit stupid. A better example would be if (itr->second == 0) – Petter Mar 4 '11 at 9:20
    
@Ben, ah - now that would be different! ;) – Nim Mar 4 '11 at 9:21
1  
@Ben: You should not use remove_if on sorted range, it violates the "sorted" assumption by rearranging elements. – Matthieu M. Mar 4 '11 at 9:32
up vote 10 down vote accepted

I think that you shouldn't use removed iterator at all - in case of lists this causes serious problems, shouldn't be different for maps.

EDIT by Matthieu M: this code is well-formed in C++0x and allowed as an extension by MSVC.

map<int,int> m;
...
auto itr = m.begin();
while (itr != m.end())
{
    if (itr->second == 0) {
        itr = m.erase(itr);
    }
    else 
    {
        itr++;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Standard c++ map::erase does not return a new iterator, that's a MSVC extension. – Erik Mar 4 '11 at 9:16
    
This code is ill-formed. There is no version of the erase function that returns an iterator. The Visual C++ standard library implementation provides such a return type, but specifically notes that it doesn't conform to the C++ Standard – decltype Mar 4 '11 at 9:17
1  
Thanks, that's why I like SO besides resolving your problems You can always learn something new. – XAder Mar 4 '11 at 9:26
2  
@Xader: I've reverted your edit and added a disclaimer, this code is well-formed in C++0x and is the canonical way of removing elements in a container, so the best answer given. (The disclaimer is so that people who don't understand that auto means C++0x don't get confused). Standard reference for the nay-sayers: n3225 23.5.1.2 element access. – Matthieu M. Mar 4 '11 at 9:42
    
@Matthieu: I agree. Since the OP wrote "C++" in his question, I assumed that auto was simply being used in the sense "this type is painfully long to write out in C++03, so I'll borrow the C++0x type specifier auto, but the example should otherwise be considered C++03," or some such ;) – decltype Mar 4 '11 at 9:53

Yes, but not the way you do it. You're invalidating itr when you erase, then incrementing the invalid iterator.

auto itr = m.begin();
while (itr != m.end()) {
  if (itr->first == 0) {
    m.erase(itr++);
  } else {
    ++itr;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for a quick answer! – Petter Mar 4 '11 at 9:04
2  
auto tmp = ++itr; m.erase(iter); itr = tmp; // This would be more understable ( IMO ). – Jagannath Mar 4 '11 at 9:09
2  
It'd also be wrong, you're incrementing before you erase... Did you perhaps intend e.g. auto tmp=itr; ++itr; m.erase(tmp); ? – Erik Mar 4 '11 at 9:10
9  
@Ben, @Erik: A warning, there are two kinds of erase methods in the standard, for node-based containers (list, map, set, ...) use this method, for containers whose erase method returns an iterator (like vector), the erase line should read itr = m.erase(itr). This signature quirk effectively throw a damp on the whole "interchangeability" thing... and so is corrected in C++0x so that all erase that did not return anything now return an iterator to the next element :) – Matthieu M. Mar 4 '11 at 9:38
4  
@dlanod lose the ++: itr = m.erase(itr); is what it should be, see e.g. en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/container/map/erase – rubenvb Jan 13 '13 at 15:37

For the example given, It would actually be easier to use the erase overload that takes a key as an argument. This function erases all elements in the map with the given key (for a map, this is always either zero or one element)

map<int,int> m; 
// ...
m.erase(0); // erase all elements with key equivalent to 0
share|improve this answer
2  
+1, IMHO, the sensible way to do it.. :) – Nim Mar 4 '11 at 9:19

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