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To write many piece of data to file, I have 2 approaches:

  1. Write to ofstream one by one directly

    ofstream file("c:\\test.txt");
    for (int i = 0; i < 10000; ++i)
    {
        file << data[i];
    }
    
  2. Write to istringstream first, and then write to ofstream at once

    ostringstream strstream;
    for (int i = 0; i < 10000; ++i)
    {
        strstream << data[i];
    }
    ofstream file("c:\\test.txt");
    file << strstream.str();
    

Not surprisingly, the second approach is faster, in fact, it is 4 times faster than the first approach on my HP7800 machine.

But why? I know ofstream is using filebuf inside, and ostringstream is using stringbuf - as a buffer they should all reside in memory thus should have no difference.

What is the difference under the hood?

share|improve this question
up vote 14 down vote accepted

Are you using std::endl a lot instead of '\n'? std::endl does two things: it inserts a '\n' into the stream and then flushes the buffer to disk. I've seen code talking a severe performance hit by doing so. (The code ran 5-10 times faster after that was fixed.)
Flushing to a string buffer will be much faster than flushing to the disk, so that would explain your findings.

If that's not the case you might consider is increasing the buffer size:

const std::size_t buf_size = 32768;
char my_buffer[buf_size];
ofstream file("c:\\test.txt");
file.rdbuf()->pubsetbuf(my_buffer, buf_size);

for (int i = 0; i < 10000; ++i)
{
    file << data[i];
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks, this is caused by the frequent flush by appending std::endl. And it turns out that both filebuf and stringbuf can grow its memory buffer size when it is not enough. see here – Baiyan Huang Mar 7 '11 at 12:21
    
Now I am thinking of why it provide us with a pubsetbuf to set buffer, - maybe it is used when we already have some content in the memory, instead of appending it to streambuf - we just let streambuf point to it. – Baiyan Huang Mar 7 '11 at 12:23
1  
@lzprgmr: 1) So my first assumption was right. Good. 2) Stream buffers usually do not grow their buffers, instead they flush to the device on overflow. String stream buffer is an exception to this, since its "device" is an in-memory buffer (from which you can obtain the string). 3) pubsetbuf() can be used when you know more about the environment/device. You can then provide the stream with a buffer of whatever size you consider good. I'm not sure if there's a use case beyond providing a custom-sized buffer. – sbi Mar 7 '11 at 14:34
    
I did a test, and the filebuf will be forced to flush if size of the buffer is not enough - not keep on growing like stringbuf does. – Baiyan Huang Mar 9 '11 at 0:51
    
@lzprgmr: Which I believe is what I wrote. – sbi Mar 9 '11 at 8:44

Disk is slow. Many small writes are more expensive than one large.

share|improve this answer
    
But that should be avoided by buffering. – sbi Mar 4 '11 at 10:06
1  
ofstream will not buffer indefinitely, it will write whenever the internal buffer reaches a threshold. – Erik Mar 4 '11 at 10:07
    
do you know what the threshold is? is there any reference. From this api description, it seems it will grow the memory if not enough. – Baiyan Huang Mar 7 '11 at 12:30
    
@lzprgmr: Sorry, no idea, I believe this is implementation dependent. sbi's answer shows how to change it though. – Erik Mar 7 '11 at 12:39

It can be implementation issue with specific OS. Also I guess the ofstream buffer(buflen) is smaller than 10000, a typical value of which is 4095. So try running with i<4096 and the response time should be quite same!

The reason why it's faster in the second case:

In the first case when the buffer is full ( buflen=4095bytes) it is written to disk. So for i<10000 it'd have caused it to be flushed 3 times.

While in the second case, all data is first prepared in the RAM and in one go flushed to the harddisk. So two flushes have been saved!

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