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I've come across a few examples recently that do things like:

<dl>
  <dt>Full Name:</dt>
  <dd><input type="text" name="fullname"></dd>
  <dt>Email Address:</dt>
  <dd><input type="text" name="email"></dd>
</dl>

for doing HTML forms. Why is that? What is the advantage over using tables?

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5  
The answer you have selected is completely invalid markup: missing "action", "method" on form, you can not place lebel and input in there like that. The example will also show on one line as there are no <br> tags (which probably not the intention). The code besides being invalid is also code soup as far as semantics go. A defintion list and table are semantically equivalent, in this case. The difference is in amount of code, dl is much shorter: pastie.org/1090219 while with table you require multiple ones to work, it's awkward: pastie.org/1090229 (continued...) –  srcspider Aug 13 '10 at 11:43
1  
If you don't care for semantics this is how to get it to be both valid and avoid using ids: pastie.org/1090225 –  srcspider Aug 13 '10 at 11:43
8  
srcspider, method is required, and technically, depending on the browser, action will be defaulted to self. The format on the answer is all done in CSS. you shouldnt need any <br />'s. It's all completely dependant on how you want to style the code –  Ascherer Jul 26 '11 at 15:17

11 Answers 11

up vote 79 down vote accepted

I guess it's up to you to determine the semantics, but in my opinion:

Rather than a definition list, form-related properties should be used.

<form>
  <label for="fullname">Full Name:</label>
  <input type="text" name="fullname" id="fullname">
  <label for="email">Email Address:</label>
  <input type="text" name="email" id="email">
</form>

The "for" attribute in the <label> tag should reference the "id" attribute of a <input> tag. Note that when labels are associated with fields, clicking the label will put the associated field in focus.

You can also use tags like <fieldset> to cluster sections of a form together and <legend> to caption a fieldset.

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21  
You can also put the input inside the label –  nickf Feb 6 '09 at 7:24
13  
+1 for being the only person to suggest the logical way to do this. A "table" is generally not semantically accurate or very flexible from a layout perspective. A "definition list" is closer but still a bit of a stretch. But "inputs" and "labels"? That's exactly what the things are! –  Chuck Feb 6 '09 at 8:00
3  
For a lot of forms, I believe a table /may/ be semantically appropriate. Not in all instances though. And as Chuck said, tables are not very flexible from a layout perspective. If you're going to use tables for your form, make sure it is semantically appropriate and make sure to use labels, too. –  sjstrutt Feb 6 '09 at 8:36
5  
nickf: Yes, but it's more flexible to don't nest them, because you can then do label{display:block;} to get labels above fields, or label{clear:both;float:left;width:300px;} to get a tabular look. –  svinto Feb 6 '09 at 9:39
1  
svinto: your second example is the approach I´m normally using. The problem is that you´re limited in the width of your labels; adding a long label or increasing the text size can lead to unwanted results and that´s where the table solution actually is more flexible. –  jeroen Feb 6 '09 at 14:05

I've succesfully used the technique outlined in this article several times.

I agree with sjstrutt that you should use form reated tags like label and form in you forms, but the HTML outlined in his example, will often lack some code you can use as "hooks" for styling your form with CSS.

As a consequense of this I markup my forms like this:

<form name="LoginForm" action="thispage">
    <fieldset>
        <legend>Form header</legend>
        <ul>
            <li>
                <label for="UserName">Username: </label>
                <input id="UserName" name="UserName" type="text" />
            </li>
            <li>
                <label for="Password">Password: </label>
                <input id="Password" name="Password" type="text" />
            </li>
        </ul>
    </fieldset>
    <fieldset class="buttons">
        <input class="submit" type="submit" value="Login" />
    </fieldset>
</form>

This approach leaves me with a comprehensible set of tags, which contains enough hooks to style the forms in a lot of different ways.

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1  
I markup my forms in exactly the same way. –  Philip Morton Feb 6 '09 at 9:28
1  
The only problem I have found with this approach is sometimes you need to put content in between 2 form elements which doesn't relate to either. Semantically, you should close the unordered list and start again, but then you may have a list consisting of only one child element. –  alex Nov 5 '09 at 6:04
    
and what about checkbox list, where will u put it? –  Sasha Dec 3 '09 at 11:10
    
@msony inside an <li>, just like the other inputs. –  DaveD Mar 7 '13 at 14:22
    
Huh? If you need hooks, use divs. That's what they're for. Semantics are great (and should be used!) but when you need an anchor for a style, it's best to use a span or a div that has no semantic meaning. A div is a box and is meant to be used as such. –  jedd.ahyoung Mar 24 at 23:27

This is a subset of the issue of semantics vs formatting. A definition list says what they are, a list of related key/value attributes, but does not say how to display it. A table says more about layout and how to display the data then what the data inside is. It limits how the list can be formatted both by overspecifying the format and by underspecifying what it is.

HTML, historically, has mixed up semantics with formatting. Font tags and tables being the worst examples. The move to CSS for the formatting and the stripping of a lot of the pure formatting tags out of XHTML restores, somewhat, the separation of meaning from formatting. By separating formatting into CSS you can display the same HTML in many different ways reformatting it for a wide browser, a small mobile browser, printing, plain text, etc...

For enlightenment, visit the CSS Zen Garden.

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I would add, that it adds intent, relationship. Later, a search engine could consume this page and discover the above code and know it's all related. –  Chuck Conway Feb 6 '09 at 7:09
    
The strange thing about dl to me is that it relies on the ordering of tags to convey the relationship between a term and its definitions. –  ehdv Apr 4 at 16:45

Definition lists have semantic meaning. They are for listing terms (<dt>) and their associated definitions (<dd>). Therefore in this case a <dl> portrays the semantic meaning of the content more accurately than a table.

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1  
Or less, since most forms are not asking for definitions of terms (while tables are generic tuple relationships). –  Quentin Jul 11 '10 at 10:36
3  
I don't agree with you David, when a form has an input for you to fill with your first name, it is asking "What is your firstname" so "Define your firstname" is completely valid, thus dt>firstname dd>your input. Of course the definition has a context, you. –  redben Nov 10 '10 at 17:46
6  
Properly used input and label tags are already unambiguous, and wrapping them in a definition list is at best tautology. As is the phrase 'semantic meaning' :) –  Ian Mackinnon Sep 24 '11 at 11:30
    
@IanMackinnon Agreed with the first part, but "semantic meaning" specifically refers to meaning outside what the elements themselves are (which is more along the lines of "literal meaning") –  Izkata Mar 25 at 15:55

In this case, labels and inputs are your semantic meaning and they stand on their own.

Imagine you had to read the web page, out load, to a blind person. You wouldn't say "Okay, I have a list of definitions here. The first term is 'name'." Instead, you'd probably say "Okay we have a form here and it looks like the there's a set of fields, the first input is labeled 'name'."

This is why the semantic web is important. It allows the content of the page to represent itself accurately to both humans and technology. For example, there are many browser plugins that help people quickly fill out web forms with their standard information (name, phone number, etc). These rarely work well if inputs don't have associated labels.

Hope that helps.

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Using dl dt,dd for forms is just another way to structure your forms, along with ul li, div and table. You can always put a label into dt. This way you keep the form specific element label in place.

<form action="/login" method="post"> 
    <dl>
        <dt><label for="login">Login</label></dt>
        <dd><input type="text" name="login" id="login"/></dd>
        <dt><label for="password">Password</label></dt>
        <dd><input type="password" name="password" id="password"/></dd>  
        <dd><input type="submit" value="Add"/></dd>
    </dl>
</form>
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8  
Your example is against the specification, as your submit button belongs to the password dt. You have multiple dd's belonging to a single dt, which is what you're doing here. I would put the submit button below the dl entirely, because the dl is only meant for name-value groups--not elements that stand on their own like a submit button. –  mrjedmao Jul 23 '10 at 12:21
4  
I don't think it is against the specification. You may have as many descriptions per term as you want (and vice versa) w3.org/TR/html401/struct/lists.html#h-10.3 But you are right, the submit button should be moved out of the Password definition. –  ak. Aug 4 '10 at 11:31
    
submit just does not have to be on the dl. It is not an input element (semantically) but an action element. –  redben Dec 13 '10 at 15:54
1  
Great! Thats is the most flexible and standard-compliant solution. Its really hard to style a form using only labels and inputs, but using <dl> it's a lot easier. –  Eduardo Cobuci Mar 10 '11 at 18:12
    
@Eduardo Cobuci: +1 Indeed this is, the best approach so far. Semanticly almost ok, and we are able to style it more properly. I can also add a fieldset element. –  MEM May 31 '11 at 16:14

Definition lists are almost never used because semantically speaking they rarely show up on the internet.

In your case the correct code has been posted:

<form>
    <label for="fullname">Full Name:</label>
    <input type="text" name="fullname" id="fullname">
    <label for="email">Email Address:</label>
    <input type="text" name="email" id="email">
</form>

You are creating a form with inputs and labels for said inputs, you are not setting forth a list of words and defining them.

If you are doing some kind of help section then definition lists would be appropriate, e.g.:

<dl>
    <dt>HTML</dt>
    <dd>Hypertext Markup Language</dd>
    <dt>CSS</dt>
    <dd>Cascade Stylesheets</dd>
    <dt>PHP</dt>
    <dd>Hypertext Preprocessor</dd>
</dl>
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Term: First Name Definition: Please supply one in the box provided. –  J Wynia Jun 18 '09 at 12:55
    
Whaaaaaaaat...? –  Andrew G. Johnson Jun 18 '09 at 13:50
    
Sorry. If you think of the term (the dt) as the things like "First Name", "Last Name", etc., the definition (the dd) can be seen as supplied by the user. –  J Wynia Dec 29 '09 at 18:32

Part of the reason for using <dl> for marking up the form is that it is much easier to do fancy CSS layout tricks with a <dl> than a <table>. The other part is that it better reflects the semantics of the form (a list of label/field pairs) than a table would.

Ok, table hate is part of it too.

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Virtually all forms are tabular. Do you ever see a form that's not tabular? The guidelines I've read suggested using the table tag for tabular presentation and that's exactly what forms, calendars, and spreadsheets are for. And now they're using DD and DT instead of tables? What is the Web coming to?! :)

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7  
I think it's example ot tablephobia;) I've seen tabular data made of nested <ul> and <ol>'s styled with tons of CSS just because tables are evil. –  el.pescado Jul 11 '10 at 11:00
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or, because <ul> and <ol> are typically far more flexible in terms of styling and re-arranging layout without changing the HTML structure. –  smclark89 Feb 22 '13 at 20:59

Sometimes, a definition list simply presents the information in the way that's desired, whilst a table does not. Personally, I would probably not use a definition list for a form, unless it suits the style of the site.

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There is best example HERE to how to use DL DD DT and where we can use it also.

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