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I have a title window based component in Flex 4 that has two states: A & B.

The title window is wider in state B.

I want the title window to animate when I switch states by using the Resize effect to widen the component.

What's the correct way to do this? Should define state specific width for the component or should I just run a transition effect that does this? The first option seems cleaner to me, but I can't figure out how to tell flex to use an effect and figure out by itself how much to resize the component..

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2 Answers 2

Assaf, You can use tween, Parallel, Move and Resize properties for the same.

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Yes, I am aware. But I'm trying to understand how to do this without explicitly invoking an effect. I want the size of the component to be determined by the state-specific properties, so that I can edit the UI in Design mode when it has the correct size per state. –  Assaf Lavie Mar 4 '11 at 13:08

I implemented something similar to your request: I needed to add a transition effect, (Resize effect), between two states included in a TitleWindow component. This is how I did it:

My two states:

<s:states>
    <s:State name="State1"/>
    <s:State name="myInfoState"/>
</s:states>

My transition effect:

<s:transitions>
    <s:Transition id="myTransition" fromState="*" toState="myInfoState">
        <s:Parallel target="{this}">
            <s:Resize duration="400"/>
        </s:Parallel>
    </s:Transition>
</s:transitions>

Note the {this} property. This is because my TitleWindow doesn't have an id.

Finally, you just need to call your currentState declaration as always:

<s:Button click="currentState = 'myInfoState'"/>

I guess that the keyword is {this} instead of the element's id.

Greetings from Pachuca, México!

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