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I keep finding a need for a container which is both a HashMap (for fast lookup on a key type) and an ArrayList (for fast access by integer index).

LinkedHashMap is almost right, in that it keeps an iterable list, but it is unfortunately a linked list... retrieving the Nth element requires iterating from 1 to N.

Is there a container type which fits this bill and which I've somehow missed? What do other people do when they need to access the same set of data by key and by index?

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7  
Could you just add all your objects to both a HashMap and an ArrayList? –  Blorgbeard Mar 4 '11 at 10:48
    
@Blorgbeard, so what happens when you remove from the map, remove from the middle of the ArrayList? The best you can get is the likes of LinkedHashMap (which is my favorite data structure in java.util) –  bestsss Mar 4 '11 at 11:19
1  
up to the moment I can't think of a single time I had to access a LinkedHashMap with an index, possibly the algorithm/datastructures can be redesigned. For instance, if you attempt to access the Map based on some row index, you'd be better off keep the key into that row as well, so you retrieve the data by using the key, not the index. –  bestsss Mar 4 '11 at 11:27
    
@bestsss - yeah, you'd have to remove from the ArrayList. So you take a O(n) hit when removing (or inserting), but have O(1) when getting by index - whereas LinkedHashMap would be the opposite, right? –  Blorgbeard Mar 4 '11 at 11:49
    
@Blorgbeard, yes, of course. Potentially it makes insert/remove quite heavy for large N –  bestsss Mar 4 '11 at 12:02
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Take a look at Apache Commons LinkedMap.

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That's exactly what I thought must exist somewhere in a standard form. It has the all-important get(int index) member. Many thanks! –  Reuben Scratton Mar 4 '11 at 11:01
    
By the name I would still think it has O(index) (or O(min(index, n-index))) complexity for the get(index) lookup. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 4 '11 at 11:13
    
@Paŭlo, yes you are right, it's linked list implementation based. You can do the same as LinkedHashMap. –  bestsss Mar 4 '11 at 11:17
1  
@Reuben, there is no way to implement a hashmap that gets O(1) for an operation like get(index). –  bestsss Mar 4 '11 at 11:18
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Why don't you simply keep the HashMap and then use hashMap.entrySet().toArray(); as suggested here?

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Doesn't that make a copy? I always assumed toArray() was super-expensive (for big lists at least) ... –  Reuben Scratton Mar 4 '11 at 10:59
1  
It is about O(n+capacity) - so you wouldn't do it everytime, only after filling the map. It is not suitable for an often changing map. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 4 '11 at 11:15
    
Paŭlo has already answered :) –  MarcoS Mar 4 '11 at 11:23
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You could do it yourself, but here's an example implemenation. The corresponding google searcht term would be "ArrayMap".

I'm not sure but maybe commons collections or google collections has such a map.

Edit:

You can create a hashmap that is implemented using an arraylist, i.e. it would work like LinkedHashMap in that the insertion order defines the list index. This would provide fast get(Index) (O(1)) and get(Name) (O(1)) access, insertion would be O(1) as well (unless the array must be extended), but deletion would be O(n) since deleting the first element would require all indices to be updated.

The trick could be done by a map that internally holds a Map for key-> index and then an ArrayList.

get(Key) would then be (simple example without error checking):

list.get(keyIndexMap.get(key));
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This has an O(1) index access (if we would add a get(index) method), but the get(key) has an O(n) complexity. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 4 '11 at 11:18
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If you are removing (in the middle) as well as accessing by index and by key (which means that the indexes are changing), you are possible out of look - I think there simply can't be an implementation which provides O(1) for both of remove (by index, key or iterator) and get(index). This is why we have both LinkedList (with iterator.remove() or remove(0) in O(1)) and ArrayList (with get(index) in O(1)) in the standard API.

You could have both removing and index-getting in O(log n) if you use a tree structure instead of array or linked list (which could be combined with a O(1) key based read access - getting the index for your key-value-pair would still need O(log n), though).

If you don't want to remove anything, or can live with following indexed not shifted (i.e. remove(i) being equivalent to set(i, null), there is nothing which forbids having both O(1) index and key access - in fact, then the index is simply a second key here, so you could simply use a HashMap and a ArrayList (or two HashMaps) then, with a thin wrapper combining both.


Edit: So, here is an implementation of ArrayHashMap like described in the last paragraph above (using the "expensive remove" variant). It implements the interface IndexedMap below. (If you don't want to copy+paste here, both are also in my github account which will be updated in case of later changes).

package de.fencing_game.paul.examples;

import java.util.*;

/**
 * A combination of ArrayList and HashMap which allows O(1) for read and
 * modifiying access by index and by key.
 * <p>
 *   Removal (either by key or by index) is O(n), though,
 *   as is indexed addition of a new Entry somewhere else than the end.
 *   (Adding at the end is in amortized O(1).)
 * </p>
 * <p>
 *   (The O(1) complexity for key based operations is under the condition
 *    "if the hashCode() method of the keys has a suitable distribution and
 *     takes constant time", as for any hash-based data structure.)
 * </p>
 * <p>
 *  This map allows null keys and values, but clients should think about
 *  avoiding using these, since some methods return null to show
 *  "no such mapping".
 * </p>
 * <p>
 *   This class is not thread-safe (like ArrayList and HashMap themselves).
 * </p>
 * <p>
 *  This class is inspired by the question
 *    <a href="http://stackoverflow.com/questions/5192706/java-is-there-a-container-which-effectively-combines-hashmap-and-arraylist">Is there a container which effectively combines HashMap and ArrayList?</a> on Stackoverflow.
 * </p>
 * @author Paŭlo Ebermann
 */
public class ArrayHashMap<K,V>
    extends AbstractMap<K,V>
    implements IndexedMap<K,V>
{

    /**
     * Our backing map.
     */
    private Map<K, SimpleEntry<K,V>> baseMap;
    /**
     * our backing list.
     */
    private List<SimpleEntry<K,V>> entries;

    /**
     * creates a new ArrayHashMap with default parameters.
     * (TODO: add more constructors which allow tuning.)
     */
    public ArrayHashMap() {
        this.baseMap = new HashMap<K,SimpleEntry<K,V>>();
        this.entries = new ArrayList<SimpleEntry<K,V>>();
    }


    /**
     * puts a new key-value mapping, or changes an existing one.
     *
     * If new, the mapping gets an index at the end (i.e. {@link #size()}
     * before it gets increased).
     *
     * This method runs in O(1) time for changing an existing value,
     *  amortized O(1) time for adding a new value.
     *
     * @return the old value, if such, else null.
     */
    public V put(K key, V value) {
        SimpleEntry<K,V> entry = baseMap.get(key);
        if(entry == null) {
            entry = new SimpleEntry<K,V>(key, value);
            baseMap.put(key, entry);
            entries.add(entry);
            return null;
        }
        return entry.setValue(value);
    }

    /**
     * retrieves the value for a key.
     *
     *   This method runs in O(1) time.
     *
     * @return null if there is no such mapping,
     *   else the value for the key.
     */
    public V get(Object key) {
        SimpleEntry<K,V> entry = baseMap.get(key);
        return entry == null ? null : entry.getValue();
    }

    /**
     * returns true if the given key is in the map.
     *
     *   This method runs in O(1) time.
     *
     */
    public boolean containsKey(Object key) {
        return baseMap.containsKey(key);
    }

    /**
     * removes a key from the map.
     *
     *   This method runs in O(n) time, n being the size of this map.
     *
     * @return the old value, if any.
     */
    public V remove(Object key) {
        SimpleEntry<K,V> entry = baseMap.remove(key);
        if(entry == null) {
            return null;
        }
        entries.remove(entry);
        return entry.getValue();
    }


    /**
     * returns a key by index.
     *
     *   This method runs in O(1) time.
     *
     */
    public K getKey(int index) {
        return entries.get(index).getKey();
    }

    /**
     * returns a value by index.
     *
     *   This method runs in O(1) time.
     *
     */
    public V getValue(int index) {
        return entries.get(index).getValue();
    }

    /**
     * Returns a set view of the keys of this map.
     *
     * This set view is ordered by the indexes.
     *
     * It supports removal by key or iterator in O(n) time.
     * Containment check runs in O(1).
     */
    public Set<K> keySet() {
        return new AbstractSet<K>() {
            public void clear() {
                entryList().clear();
            }

            public int size() {
                return entries.size();
            }

            public Iterator<K> iterator() {
                return keyList().iterator();
            }

            public boolean remove(Object key) {
                return keyList().remove(key);
            }

            public boolean contains(Object key) {
                return keyList().contains(key);
            }
        };
    }  // keySet()

    /**
     * Returns a set view of the entries of this map.
     *
     * This set view is ordered by the indexes.
     *
     * It supports removal by entry or iterator in O(n) time.
     *
     * It supports adding new entries at the end, if the key
     * is not already used in this map, in amortized O(1) time.
     *
     * Containment check runs in O(1).
     */
    public Set<Map.Entry<K,V>> entrySet() {
        return new AbstractSet<Map.Entry<K,V>>() {

            public void clear() {
                entryList().clear();
            }

            public int size() {
                return entries.size();
            }
            public Iterator<Map.Entry<K,V>> iterator() {
                return entryList().iterator();
            }
            public boolean add(Map.Entry<K,V> e) {
                return entryList().add(e);
            }

            public boolean contains(Object o) {
                return entryList().contains(o);
            }

            public boolean remove(Object o) {
                return entryList().remove(o);
            }


        };
    }  // entrySet()

    /**
     * Returns a list view of the entries of this map.
     *
     * This list view is ordered by the indexes.
     *
     * It supports removal by entry, iterator or sublist.clear in O(n) time.
     * (n being the length of the total list, not the sublist).
     *
     * It supports adding new entries at the end, if the key
     * is not already used in this map, in amortized O(1) time.
     *
     * Containment check runs in O(1).
     */
    public List<Map.Entry<K,V>> entryList() {
        return new AbstractList<Map.Entry<K,V>>() {
            public void clear() {
                baseMap.clear();
                entries.clear();
            }
            public Map.Entry<K,V> get(int index) {
                return entries.get(index);
            }
            public int size() {
                return entries.size();
            }
            public Map.Entry<K,V> remove(int index) {
                Map.Entry<K,V> e = entries.remove(index);
                baseMap.remove(e.getKey());
                return e;
            }
            public void add(int index, Map.Entry<K,V> newEntry) {
                K key = newEntry.getKey();
                SimpleEntry<K,V> clone = new SimpleEntry<K,V>(newEntry);
                if(baseMap.containsKey(key)) {
                    throw new IllegalArgumentException("duplicate key " +
                                                       key);
                }
                entries.add(index, clone);
                baseMap.put(key, clone);
            }

            public boolean contains(Object o) {
                if(o instanceof Map.Entry) {
                    SimpleEntry<K,V> inMap =
                        baseMap.get(((Map.Entry<?,?>)o).getKey());
                    return inMap != null &&
                        inMap.equals(o);
                }
                return false;
            }

            public boolean remove(Object o) {
                if (!(o instanceof Map.Entry)) {
                    Map.Entry<?,?> e = (Map.Entry<?,?>)o;
                    SimpleEntry<K,V> inMap = baseMap.get(e.getKey());
                    if(inMap != null && inMap.equals(e)) {
                        entries.remove(inMap);
                        baseMap.remove(inMap.getKey());
                        return true;
                    }
                }
                return false;
            }

            protected void removeRange(int fromIndex, int toIndex) {
                List<SimpleEntry<K,V>> subList =
                    entries.subList(fromIndex, toIndex);
                for(SimpleEntry<K,V> entry : subList){
                    baseMap.remove(entry.getKey());
                }
                subList.clear();
            }

        };
    }   // entryList()


    /**
     * Returns a List view of the keys in this map.
     *
     * It allows index read access and key containment check in O(1).
     * Changing a key is not allowed.
     *
     * Removal by key, index, iterator or sublist.clear runs in O(n) time
     * (this removes the corresponding values, too).
     */
    public List<K> keyList() {
        return new AbstractList<K>() {
            public void clear() {
                entryList().clear();
            }
            public K get(int index) {
                return entries.get(index).getKey();
            }
            public int size() {
                return entries.size();
            }
            public K remove(int index) {
                Map.Entry<K,V> e = entries.remove(index);
                baseMap.remove(e.getKey());
                return e.getKey();
            }

            public boolean remove(Object key) {
                SimpleEntry<K,V> entry = baseMap.remove(key);
                if(entry == null) {
                    return false;
                }
                entries.remove(entry);
                return true;
            }

            public boolean contains(Object key) {
                return baseMap.containsKey(key);
            }

            protected void removeRange(int fromIndex, int toIndex) {
                entryList().subList(fromIndex, toIndex).clear();
            }
        };
    }  // keyList()

    /**
     * Returns a List view of the values in this map.
     *
     * It allows get and set by index in O(1) time (set changes the mapping).
     *
     * Removal by value, index, iterator or sublist.clear is possible
     * in O(n) time, this removes the corresponding keys too (only the first
     * key with this value for remove(value)).
     *
     * Containment check needs an iteration, thus O(n) time.
     */
    public List<V> values() {
        return new AbstractList<V>() {
            public int size() {
                return entries.size();
            }
            public void clear() {
                entryList().clear();
            }
            public V get(int index) {
                return entries.get(index).getValue();
            }
            public V set(int index, V newValue) {
                Map.Entry<K,V> e = entries.get(index);
                return e.setValue(newValue);
            }

            public V remove(int index) {
                Map.Entry<K,V> e = entries.remove(index);
                baseMap.remove(e.getKey());
                return e.getValue();
            }
            protected void removeRange(int fromIndex, int toIndex) {
                entryList().subList(fromIndex, toIndex).clear();
            }
        };
    }  // values()


    /**
     * an usage example method.
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        IndexedMap<String,String> imap = new ArrayHashMap<String, String>();

        for(int i = 0; i < args.length-1; i+=2) {
            imap.put(args[i], args[i+1]);
        }
        System.out.println(imap.values());
        System.out.println(imap.keyList());
        System.out.println(imap.entryList());
        System.out.println(imap);
        System.out.println(imap.getKey(0));
        System.out.println(imap.getValue(0));

    }


}

Here the interface:

package de.fencing_game.paul.examples;


import java.util.*;

/**
 * A map which additionally to key-based access allows index-based access
 * to keys and values.
 * <p>
 * Inspired by the question <a href="http://stackoverflow.com/questions/5192706/java-is-there-a-container-which-effectively-combines-hashmap-and-arraylist">Is there a container which effectively combines HashMap and ArrayList?</a> on Stackoverflow.
 * </p>
 * @author Paŭlo Ebermann
 * @see ArrayHashMap
 */
public interface IndexedMap<K,V>
    extends Map<K,V>
{

    /**
     * returns a list view of the {@link #entrySet} of this Map.
     *
     * This list view supports removal of entries, if the map is mutable.
     *
     * It may also support indexed addition of new entries per the
     *  {@link List#add add} method - but this throws an
     *  {@link IllegalArgumentException} if the key is already used.
     */
    public List<Map.Entry<K,V>> entryList();


    /**
     * returns a list view of the {@link #keySet}.
     * 
     * This list view supports removal of keys (with the corresponding
     * values), but does not support addition of new keys.
     */
    public List<K> keyList();


    /**
     * returns a list view of values contained in this map.
     *
     * This list view supports removal of values (with the corresponding
     * keys), but does not support addition of new values.
     * It may support the {@link List#set set} operation to change the
     * value for a key.
     */
    public List<V> values();


    /**
     * Returns a value of this map by index.
     *
     * This is equivalent to
     *   {@ #values() values()}.{@link List#get get}{@code (index)}.
     */
    public V getValue(int index);

    /**
     * Returns a key of this map by index.
     *
     * This is equivalent to
     *   {@ #keyList keyList()}.{@link List#get get}{@code (index)}.
     */
    public K getKey(int index);

}
share|improve this answer
    
ŭlo, you know what's funny about the remove(index) O(1) of LinkedList, that finding the index itself it's O(n) traverse through a linked structure (which is slower than the ArrayList variant) –  bestsss Mar 4 '11 at 11:33
    
For the iterator remove it is O(1), though. Yeah, should have written that, too. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 4 '11 at 11:40
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