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Does anyone know of any gotchas when changing a C# .NET 2.0 executable file name on a post build event, given that the executable is strong named and has an embedded manifest? Additionally, the executable will be signed by a third party before being packaged in a installer.

I know any associated .config files also need to be renamed to reflect the new executable name.

Am I also right in guessing that the best solution is to change the assembly name in the project properties, rather than renaming the executable file name? The problem is Visual Studio doesn't play nice with conditional assembly names. (i.e. adding a condition attribute to the tag in the .csproj)

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You seem to mention two problems but described neither. No, renaming a file is never a real problem. –  Hans Passant Mar 4 '11 at 14:04
4  
There is no real benefit to strong naming an exe. The benefit to strong naming a dll, is that someone cannot replace it with their own version of a malicious one (and you can put it in the GAC). Unless you are referencing your exe in another project as if it were a dll (which would be strange), you don't need to strong name it. –  jonathanpeppers Mar 4 '11 at 14:50
    
@Jonathan.Peppers - that sounds more like an answer than a comment. If you put it as an answer we can vote it up! –  RQDQ Mar 4 '11 at 20:20
    
Just did it. Sometimes I feel a grey area between comment and answer, as I was not 100% sure if removing the strong name would fix his issue even though it is most likely not needed. –  jonathanpeppers Mar 4 '11 at 22:03
    
@RQDQ - Jonothan didn't answer my question, that's why I said it should've been a comment rather than an answer. I never asked whether strong naming an executable was a problem, I asked whether renaming a managed executable (that just happens to be strong named and have an embedded manifest) is a problem. It's valuable information but doesn't answer my question. –  Brent Newbury Mar 8 '11 at 10:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

VS loads project once and then stores it in memory. If you want to build two assemblies from VS you can add AfterBuild target and call MSBuild to build your assembly again but with different parameters:

<ProperttyGroup Condition="'$(BuildAgain)'==''">
     <!-- Default parameters to VS -->
     <AssemblyName>Name1,Default</AssemblyName>   
<ProperttyGroup>

<ProperttyGroup Condition="'$(BuildAgain)'=='true'">
     <!-- Overrided parameters -->
     <AssemblyName>Name2.Custom</AssemblyName>   
<ProperttyGroup>

<Target Name="AfterBuild"
        Condition="'$(BuildAgain)'==''">
     <MSBuild Projects="$(MSBuildProjectFullPath)"
              Properties="BuildAgain=true;Configuration=$(Configuration);Platform=$(Platform)"
              Targets="Rebuild" 
</Target>
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Works a treat! The only thing to note is that the AfterBuild target should have Condition=' $(BuildAgain) =='' to stop the error 'There is a circular dependency in the target dependency graph involving target "Build"' –  Brent Newbury Mar 8 '11 at 10:41
    
Agree. I've corrected the answer. –  Sergio Rykov Mar 8 '11 at 17:57

There is no real benefit to strong naming an exe. The benefit to strong naming a dll, is that someone cannot replace it with their own version of a malicious one (and you can put it in the GAC). Unless you are referencing your exe in another project as if it were a dll (which would be strange), you don't need to strong name it.

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1  
It's just something we've always done. Thank you for the information, I always appreciate any other knowledge, but maybe this would've been better as a comment rather than an answer? It just decreases the likeliness that someone will attempt to answer the question from the list. Again, it is appreciated. –  Brent Newbury Mar 5 '11 at 10:25

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