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I'm trying to learn the STL library and I'm having a weird problem. This code compiles perfectly:

void Show(vector<int> myvec)
{
    vector<int>::iterator it;
    cout << "Vector contains:";
    for( it = myvec.begin(); it < myvec.end(); it++) 
    {
         cout << " " << *it;
    }
    cout << endl;
}

while this one gives me an error message at compile time:

template <class T> 
void Show2(vector<T> myvec)
{
    vector<T>::iterator it;
    cout << "Vector contains:";
    for( it = myvec.begin(); it < myvec.end(); it++)
    {
         cout << " " << *it;
    }
    cout << endl;
}

The error is:

$ g++ hello.cpp
hello.cpp: In function ‘void Show2(std::vector<T, std::allocator<_Tp1> >)’:
hello.cpp:19: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘it’
hello.cpp:21: error: ‘it’ was not declared in this scope

It seems a very simple mistake, but I couldn't find it.

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possible duplicate of Where to put the "template" and "typename" on dependent names –  FredOverflow Mar 4 '11 at 11:07
1  
Likely answered a lot before, but hard to search for typename/dependent names if you don't know that such terms exist –  Erik Mar 4 '11 at 11:09
    
@FredOverflow that's a very nice link and I'll probably read it right now. But, like @Erik said if you don't know what is the underlying problem, you'll search for many specific terms and never for the more general problem. I did many searches for iterators, templates, vector, STL,... and found nothing I didn't even knew the keyword typename existed (:( yeah, I'm a noob :P). I thought it was just a stupid syntax error. –  Rafael S. Calsaverini Mar 4 '11 at 11:25
    
That's fine, nobody is complaining ;) –  FredOverflow Mar 4 '11 at 11:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You need to say typename vector<T>::iterator it.

On another note, you're passing vectors by value. That means the entire vector gets copied in the function call. void Show(vector<T> const &myvec) and using const_iterator would be wiser.

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3  
If he passes a const ref, you need to also tell him to use a const_iterator. –  Erik Mar 4 '11 at 11:08
    
@Erik: absolutely right, updated my post. –  larsmans Mar 4 '11 at 11:09
    
thanks for the tip. –  Rafael S. Calsaverini Mar 4 '11 at 11:22

You need this:

typename vector<T>::iterator it;

This tells the compiler that vector<T>::iterator should be treated as a type, something it can't assume since iterator is dependent on what T is.

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Some compilers have problems detecting what is a member name and what is a type name, when inside templates. Try writing something like this in the first line of your template function body.

typename vector<T>::iterator it;

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1  
Correct, but it is not really a compiler problem. The C++ Standard mandates that the compiler treat a dependent name in a template as a member and not a type, unless typename is used. –  decltype Mar 4 '11 at 11:11
1  
It's not "some compilers". The grammar simply does not allow it. "Some compilers" can double-guess programmer by retrying with typename if parsing fails without it and thus compiling some incorrect cases. –  Jan Hudec Mar 4 '11 at 11:18
    
You are right. Point taken! –  CygnusX1 Mar 4 '11 at 11:29

Maybe it works using typename vector<T>::iterator it; Your compiler cannot know that there is an inner class iterator.

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In the first instance the parameter, although it uses a template, is not a template, it is a fully defined class (vector<int>)

In the latter instance the parameter is a template on type T and thus requires typename

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