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hey i am new to c# plz help. i am writing a program that sorts data in a file and it is a time consuming process so i thought that i should run it in a separate thread and since it has alot of step so i made a new class for it. the problem is that i want to show the progress in the main GUI and i know for that i have to use Invoke function but the problem is that the form control variables are not accessible it this class. what should i do ??????

sample code:

public class Sorter
{
    private string _path;
    public Sorter(string path)
    {
        _path = path;
    }

    public void StartSort()
    {
        try
        {
                 processFiles(_path, "h4x0r"); // Just kidding
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Error: " + e.ToString(), "Error", MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Error);
        }
    }

    private void processFiles(string Dir, string[] key)
    {
        /* sorting program */

    }

and it is used as

    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        Sorter sort;
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void browseBtn_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            if (folderBrowserDialog1.ShowDialog() == DialogResult.OK)
                textBox1.Text = folderBrowserDialog1.SelectedPath;
        }

        private void startBtn_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            if (startBtn.Text == "Start Sorting")
            {
   Thread worker = new Thread(new ThreadStart(delegate() {
                sort = new Sorter(textBox1.Text);
                sort.StartSort(); })); 
                worker.start();
            }
            else
                MessageBox.Show("Cancel");//TODO: add cancelling code here
        }
    }

plz help..

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Using another thread won't magically make it faster. –  ShellShock Mar 4 '11 at 11:54
3  
No, but it will stop him locking up his UI. All long running processes should be run on a thread other than the UI thread. –  Ian Mar 4 '11 at 11:54
3  
Have you had a look at using the BackgroundWorker? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… and dotnetperls.com/backgroundworker –  astander Mar 4 '11 at 11:55
1  
it would not make it faster but the GUI will not hang till the process ends. –  akshay.is.gr8 Mar 4 '11 at 11:55
    
@ShellShock: It won't make it faster but it will prevent the GUI from locking up during the processing. –  Nick Mar 4 '11 at 11:56
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Add an Event to your class that is doing the multi-threaded work, that triggers when the progress changes. Have your form subscribe to this event and update the progress bar.

Note ProgressEventArgs is a little class that inherits EventArgs and has an Integer for the progress.

// delegate to update progress
public delegate void ProgressChangedEventHandler(Object sender, ProgressEventArgs e);

// Event added to your worker class.
public event ProgressChangedEventHandler ProgressUpdateEvent

// Method to raise the event
public void UpdateProgress(object sender, ProgressEventArgs e)
{
   ProgressChangedEventHandler handler;
   lock (progressUpdateEventLock)
   {
      handler = progressUpdateEvent;
   }

   if (handler != null)
      handler(sender, e);
}
share|improve this answer
    
The event will be invoked by the calling thread, hence execution of the handler will still not be in the context of the Form thread, unless invoked as such. In such cases the OP will need to look into ISynchronizeInvoke. –  Grant Thomas Mar 4 '11 at 11:55
    
Ummm, yes you'll still need to invoke at somepoint because the event will be triggered on the worker thread. –  Nick Mar 4 '11 at 11:55
    
Hmm, ok. I've removed the comment about the Invoke, obviously that'll still be needed. But still using events is the most elegant solution. –  Ian Mar 4 '11 at 12:01
    
thankx for it. worked flawlessly. just being inquisitive is there any way to update the progress bar from the sorter class??? –  akshay.is.gr8 Mar 4 '11 at 12:47
    
You would have to expose the progress bar on the form as a public member and then pass the instance of the form into your sorter. There's normally a property in the designer to change between private/protected/public etc. That would be the 'easy' way but it will get you into bad programming habits and a tangle of dependencies, so I suggested the correct way to do it. –  Ian Mar 4 '11 at 13:58
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I would recommend you read up on the BackgroundWorker class. It is exactly for the problem you are trying to solve and makes things a lot easier than doing manual threading yourself.

Brief Example

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        backgroundWorker.WorkerReportsProgress = true;
        backgroundWorker.WorkerSupportsCancellation = true;
        backgroundWorker.ProgressChanged += new ProgressChangedEventHandler(backgroundWorker_ProgressChanged);
    }

    void backgroundWorker_ProgressChanged(object sender, ProgressChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        progressBar1.Value = e.ProgressPercentage;
    }

    private void btnStart_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (!backgroundWorker.IsBusy)
            backgroundWorker.RunWorkerAsync();
    }

    private void backgroundWorker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
        for (int i = 1; i < 101; ++i)
        {
            if (backgroundWorker.CancellationPending)
            {
                e.Cancel = true;
                break;
            }
            else
            {
                //Sort Logic is in here.
                Thread.Sleep(250);
                backgroundWorker.ReportProgress(i);
            }
        }
    }

    private void btnCancel_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (backgroundWorker.IsBusy && backgroundWorker.WorkerSupportsCancellation)
            backgroundWorker.CancelAsync();
    }
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You could do something like this:

public delegate void StatusReporter(double progressPercentage);

public class MainClass
{

    public void MainMethod()
    {
        Worker worker = new Worker(ReportProgress);

        ThreadStart start = worker.DoWork;
        Thread workThread = new Thread(start);

        workThread.Start();

    }

    private void ReportProgress(double progressPercentage)
    {
        //Report here!!!
    }
}


public class Worker
{
    private readonly StatusReporter _reportProgress;

    public Worker(StatusReporter reportProgress)
    {
        _reportProgress = reportProgress;
    }

    public void DoWork()
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++ )
        {
            // WORK, WORK, WORK
            _reportProgress(i);
        }
    }
}
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There are a few option available to solve this sort of issue. In any case, you will have to fiddle with Invoke to get the UI to update.

You could...

  • ...add an event that fires on your new class which your UI can listen to, and Invoke as applicable - you'd still need to pass the data to your worker class (by constructor, properties, method call, etc)
  • ...keep the method as a method on your form, and pas that to start your new thread from (after all, a new thread doesn't have to be starting in a different class)
  • ...change the access modifiers on your controls to be (say) internal such that any class within the same assembly can Invoke changes to the controls, or read from them.
  • ...make your worker class a child of the form it needs to access - it can then see the privates of its parent, as long as it is passed a reference to the instance.
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