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hi i have a situation like this:

>>> def get():
...     for i in range(3):
...             yield [0]
... 

and i want to get this: [0,0,0]

my code now works in this way:

>>> r = []
>>> r.extend(i[0] for i in get())
>>> r
[0, 0, 0]

but i don't like i[0].. some advice?

(i'm on python3)

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7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

r.extend(i[0] for i in get())

This kind of imperative code (stateful, with inplace updates) is asking for trouble. That seems the canonical use for a functional flatten (concat):

from itertools import chain

def flatten(listOfLists):
    return chain.from_iterable(listOfLists)

def get():
    for i in range(3):
        yield [0]

print(list(flatten(get())))
# [0, 0, 0]
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Your code looks very strange, but I assume it's very simplified. If it's just about getting rid of the i[0], do this:

>>> def get():
...     for i in range(3):
...             yield 0
... 
>>> r = []
>>> r.extend(get())
>>> r
[0, 0, 0]
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2  
Why the [i for i in get()]? This needlessly allocates a list, and i for i in is a tautology. –  phihag Mar 4 '11 at 12:54
    
phihag: True, thanks for the hint, updated :) –  Danilo Bargen Mar 4 '11 at 13:07

To me, this looks like get can only ever return a list of length 1. If that's the case, drop the braces:

>>> def get():
...     for i in range(3):
...             yield 0
>>> # Or, shorter ...
>>> get = lambda: (0 for i in range(3))
>>> r = []
>>> r.extend(get())
>>> r
[0, 0, 0]
share|improve this answer
    
or even shorter: get = lambda: [0]*3. –  Björn Pollex Mar 4 '11 at 12:16
    
@Space_C0wb0y Nope that's shorter in code, but creates a list instead of a generator. For large values of 3, your solution allocates lots of potentially unneeded memory. –  phihag Mar 4 '11 at 12:17
    
@philhag I like the idea of "large values of 3" = that could make maths interesting :-) –  neil Mar 4 '11 at 13:37

The reason you are having to use i[0] is because get() is a generator that returns a list of size 1 every time it is called. So your code i[0] for i in get() is the same as i[0] for i in ([0],[0],[0]). The reason your code works is that i[0] gets the first element off the returned element which is itself the list [0].

What I gather from your question is that you want to have i for i in [0,0,0]. As mentioned in other answers this can be achieved by changing you generator to yield the int 0 instead of the list [0]. You can see the result of the generator in the following example code:

>>> for i in get():
...   print("i={} and i[0]={}".format(i, i[0]))
... 
i=[0] and i[0]=0
i=[0] and i[0]=0
i=[0] and i[0]=0

As you can see, your generator returns a [0] every iteration and that is the reason you have to use i[0] to get the first element of each list.

Also, since r is just the results of the generator, you can simplify by just doing the following:

>>> def gen():
...   for i in range(3):
...     yield 0
... 
>>> r = list(gen())
>>> r
[0, 0, 0]
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Don't yield an array if you don't want one:

>>> def get():
...  for i in range(3):
...   yield 0
... 
>>> r = []
>>> r.extend(i for i in get())
>>> r
[0, 0, 0]
share|improve this answer
1  
r.extend(get()) suffices. –  Björn Pollex Mar 4 '11 at 12:15
    
Indeed, quite right. –  Greg Hewgill Mar 4 '11 at 12:21

You could try this instead:

def get():
    return [0] * 3

r = [] 
r.extend(get())
r
[0, 0, 0]
share|improve this answer

???

def get():
    for i in xrange(3):
        yield 0

r = list(get())

print r

or

gen = (0 for i in xrange(3))

r = list(gen)

print r
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i already have a function that yield [someint] and i can't modify it –  nkint Mar 4 '11 at 15:14

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