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I'm trying to learn a bit about dynamically generating event handlers and I'm having difficulty trying to recreate this simple situation:

public delegate void SomethingHappenedEventHandler(object sender, object args);
public event SomethingHappenedEventHandler SomethingHappened;

// This is the event handler that I want to create dynamically
public void DoSomething(object a, object b)
{
    DoSomethingElse(a, b);
}

public void DoSomethingElse(object a, object b)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Yay! " + a + " " + b);
}

I've used reflector to generate the IL for the DoSomething method, and it gives me:

.method public hidebysig instance void DoSomething(object a, object b) cil managed
{
    .maxstack 8
    L_0000: ldarg.0 
    L_0001: ldarg.1 
    L_0002: ldarg.2 
    L_0003: call instance void MyNamespace::DoSomethingElse(object, object)
    L_0008: ret 
}

So, I've written the following code to dynamically generate and execute a method equivalent to DoSomething(...):

public void CreateDynamicHandler()
{
    var eventInfo = GetType().GetEvent("SomethingHappened");
    var eventHandlerType = eventInfo.EventHandlerType;

    var dynamicMethod = new DynamicMethod("DynamicMethod", null, new[] { typeof(object), typeof(object) }, GetType());
    var ilgen = dynamicMethod.GetILGenerator();
    ilgen.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg_0);
    ilgen.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg_1);
    ilgen.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg_2);

    MethodInfo doSomethingElse = GetType().GetMethod("DoSomethingElse", new[] { typeof(object), typeof(object) });
    ilgen.Emit(OpCodes.Call, doSomethingElse);
    ilgen.Emit(OpCodes.Ret);

    Delegate emitted = dynamicMethod.CreateDelegate(eventHandlerType);
    emitted.DynamicInvoke("hello", "world");
}

However, when I run this I get an InvalidProgramException: JIT Compiler encountered an internal limitation.

Can anyone point out where I've gone wrong?

[EDIT] As several people have commented, the whole IL generation thing is unnecessary if I know all of the types involved. My reason for doing this is that this is the first step towards dynamically generating event handlers at runtime for events where I do not know all the types involved. Basically I'd been following the example at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms228976.aspx, got stuck, and then tried to unwind things into a simple example that I could get working.

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You could use expressions to compile functions. That's usually easier than using Reflection.Emit –  CodesInChaos Mar 4 '11 at 12:32
    
Why do you make your "emitted" variable a Delegate? Make it the same type as your eventHandlerType and cast. Then you can call it like normal instead of DynamicInvoke(). If this isn't your issue, which line throws the exception? That info would be helpful. –  jonathanpeppers Mar 4 '11 at 13:00
    
Even with your EDIT, it is still very unlikely that you need to generate a method dynamically by generating IL at run-time. You can still just use types and methods at run-time using Reflection and use MethodBase.Invoke() to call them, or you can use the dynamic type. –  Timwi Mar 4 '11 at 20:53
    
@Timwi your updated example has really helped me figure out the correct approach. The microsoft example I mentioned, together with the fact that some of the events I'm trying to handle do not conform to the standard event signature, meant I got distracted by thinking I needed to dynamically create a handler with the correct signature. However, it turns out that the events can be handled by handlers with 1, 2 or 3 parameters, so I only need to hardcode 3 handlers that take the correct number of parameters (of type object) and then wire them up using reflection. Thanks! –  Akash Mar 5 '11 at 9:43
    
In fact, you can just have a single handler with 1 parameter of type object[]. –  Timwi Mar 8 '11 at 13:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It is unclear why you would want to create this method dynamically. I can’t really think of any situation in which you couldn’t just apply a lambda to the event:

public delegate void SomethingHappenedEventHandler(object sender, object args);
public event SomethingHappenedEventHandler SomethingHappened;

public void DoSomethingElse(object a, object b)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Yay! " + a + " " + b);
}

// If the signature exactly matches the delegate, just use the method name
SomethingHappened += DoSomethingElse;

public void DoSomethingDifferent(object a)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Yay! " + a);
}

// Otherwise, just use a lambda expression
SomethingHappened += (a, b) => DoSomethingDifferent(a);

That said, the reason your code doesn’t work is because DynamicMethod generates only static methods. Therefore, the IL code is invalid because Ldarg_0 and Ldarg_1 load the two parameters but Ldarg_2 refers to a non-existent parameter. If I change it in the following way, it works as one would expect — it is now a static method with three parameters, where the first parameter is basically this:

public void CreateDynamicHandler()
{
    var dynamicMethod = new DynamicMethod("DynamicMethod", null,
        new[] { typeof(MyClass), typeof(object), typeof(object) }, typeof(MyClass));
    var ilgen = dynamicMethod.GetILGenerator();
    ilgen.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg_0);
    ilgen.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg_1);
    ilgen.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg_2);

    MethodInfo doSomethingElse = typeof(MyClass).GetMethod("DoSomethingElse",
        new[] { typeof(object), typeof(object) });
    ilgen.Emit(OpCodes.Call, doSomethingElse);
    ilgen.Emit(OpCodes.Ret);

    Delegate emitted = dynamicMethod.CreateDelegate(
        typeof(Action<MyClass, string, string>));
    emitted.DynamicInvoke(this, "Hello", "World");
}

Replace “MyClass” with the name of your class.

Regarding the EDIT of your question, you don’t need to generate a dynamic method by writing IL code in order to call a method dynamically at runtime. Just use Reflection, for example:

public void DoSomething(object a, object b)
{
    var method = GetType().GetMethod("DoSomethingElse", BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public);
    method.Invoke(this, new object[] { a, b });
}

or:

// Note “static”
public static void DoSomething(dynamic instance, object a, object b)
{
    // This will call whatever “DoSomethingElse” method exists on the type
    // that “instance” has *at run-time*
    instance.DoSomethingElse(a, b);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I hadn't realised that DynamicMethod only generates static methods (though it makes sense in hindsight). It also explains why reflector was showing the extra parameter because the method in my example code was not static. –  Akash Mar 4 '11 at 13:54
    
See the edit in the original question as to why I want to do this - you are right that it makes no sense in the context of the example I posted. –  Akash Mar 4 '11 at 13:55
1  
@Akash: I edited the answer to address this. Please take note :) –  Timwi Mar 4 '11 at 20:57
    
Thanks for the update - very helpful. I don't need it now, but I had forgotten about the dynamic option - one to remember! –  Akash Mar 5 '11 at 9:44

How about this scenario...

You have pairs of Methods and events such that each pair is MethodAsync and MethodCompleted. Each MethodCompleted has a different signature (differing in the subtype of the eventargs, which is the second parameter).

You want to create a wrapper for calling a given MethodAsync that hooks an all-purpose eventhandler up to the corresponding MethodCompleted.

Normally, you could create a method "void GlobalHandler(object, object)", and do

MethodCompleted += GlobalHandler;  

However, you cannot pass the event object, so you have to use reflection to get a reference to the event handler and then do AddHandler. Again, the snag is that AddHandler doesn't like polymorphism (it seems), and complains that MethodCompleted wants something other than GlobalHandler.

In such a case, it seems like you'd need to create a DynamicMethod of the EXACT signature that MethodCompleted expects, and then call GlobalHandler from that. Am I right, or am I also missing something here.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you cast the GlobalHandler to the required delegate type? code.logos.com/blog/2008/07/casting_delegates.html provides some code to do the necessary casting. –  Akash Mar 16 '11 at 14:12

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