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I have a function that I dont quite understand

There are 109 addresses from 0 to 110.

How is this code shifting text to the left ?

b=0;
while(b<109)
{
  Display_Buffer[b] = Display_Buffer[b+1];
  b++;
}

if b starts at 0, then b+1 should scroll the text to the RIGHT instead ??? Or am I getting this wrong ? because at 0, b+1 means the address is 1, if its b-1, then the address should be 110 (hence scrolling left) ... But thats not the case here, can someone provide a rough explanation ?

The display_buffer contains the string information stored in its arrays.

--

EDIT

Thanks guys !! What if I replaced Display_Buffer[b+1] with [b-1] ... will this reverse the process ? how ?

Okay I realized I have to add b=109 and while (b!=0) .. or else that wont make sense.

But still, if Display_Buffer[109]=Display_Buffer[108], does that mean it will produce the same effect as you guys answered but in reverse ?

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1  
You're just copying elements from b+1 to b, i.e. moving everything down by one element. –  Paul R Mar 4 '11 at 13:13
    
You're reading the assignment backwards. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 4 '11 at 13:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
                           /*  [a|b|c|d|e|f|...]   */
Display[0] = Display[1]    /*  [b|b|c|d|e|f|...]   */
Display[1] = Display[2]    /*  [b|c|c|d|e|f|...]   */
Display[2] = Display[3]    /*  [b|c|d|d|e|f|...]   */
//     ...
                           /*  [b|c|d|e|f|g|...]   */

When you do this kind of things, you must take care to not overwrite from the wrong direction ...

                           /*  [a|b|c|d|e|f|...]   */
Display[1] = Display[0]    /*  [a|a|c|d|e|f|...]   */
Display[2] = Display[1]    /*  [a|a|a|d|e|f|...]   */
//     ...
                           /*  [a|a|a|a|a|a|...]   */

To do the same thing from the end

Display[last] = Display[last-1]    /*  [a|b|c|d|e|f|...]   */
//     ...
Display[2] = Display[1]            /*  [a|b|b|c|d|e|...]   */
Display[1] = Display[0]            /*  [a|a|b|c|d|e|...]   */
Display[0] = ' '                   /*  [ |a|b|c|d|e|...]   */
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Thanks guys !! What if I replaced Display_Buffer[b+1] with [b-1] ... will this reverse the process ? how ? –  NLed Mar 4 '11 at 13:20
    
Perfect, you get the answer for replying to my second question :D THanks –  NLed Mar 4 '11 at 13:27

Each position is assigned the value of the position to the right of it, so the effect is a scroll to the left.

Consider this awesome ASCII art:

         0  1  2  3  4
Before: [h][e][l][l][o]
 After: [e][l][l][o][ ]

The slot at position 0 is set to the value of slot 1, so 'h' becomes 'e', and so on.

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1  
+1 for awesome ASCII Art –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 4 '11 at 13:17
    
Thanks guys !! What if I replaced Display_Buffer[b+1] with [b-1] ... will this reverse the process ? how ? –  NLed Mar 4 '11 at 13:20

It's setting the byte at position b to be equal to the byte at position b+1

so bytes slowly move left, one at a time

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Lets say Display_Buffer was "abcd" initially. So Display_Buffer[0] = 'a', Display_Buffer[1] = 'b' etc. Now what your are doing is DisplayBuffer[0] = DisplayBuffer[1] i.e. replacing 'a' with 'b' and similarly 'b' with 'c' and 'c' with 'd'. This produces the effect of text shifting to the left.

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Thanks guys !! What if I replaced Display_Buffer[b+1] with [b-1] ... will this reverse the process ? how ? –  NLed Mar 4 '11 at 13:19

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