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OK I am using different taggers to tag a text. Default, unigram, bigram and trigram.

I have to check which combination of three of those four taggers is the most accurate.

To do that i have to loop through all the possible combinations which i do like this:

permutaties = list(itertools.permutations(['default_tagger','unigram_tagger',
                                              'bigram_tagger','trigram_tagger'],3))
resultaten = [] 
for element in permutaties:
        resultaten.append(accuracy(element))

so each element is a tuple of three tagmethods like for example: ('default_tagger', 'bigram_tagger', 'trigram_tagger')

In the accuracy function I now have to dynamically call the three accompanying methods of each tagger, the problem is: I don't know how to do this.

The tagger functions are as follows:

unigram_tagger = nltk.UnigramTagger(brown_train, backoff=backofff)

bigram_tagger = nltk.BigramTagger(brown_train, backoff=backofff)

trigram_tagger = nltk.TrigramTagger(brown_train, backoff=backofff)

default_tagger = nltk.DefaultTagger('NN')

So for the example the code should become:

t0 = nltk.DefaultTagger('NN')
t1 = nltk.BigramTagger(brown_train, backoff=t0)
t2 = nltk.TrigramTagger(brown_train, backoff=t1)
t2.evaluate(brown_test)

So in essence the problem is how to iterate through all 24 combinations of that list of 4 functions.

Any Python Masters that can help me?

share|improve this question
1  
Shouldn't the example be ('defaultTagger', 'bigramTag', 'trigramTag') ? – Rod Mar 4 '11 at 14:12
1  
while the Python masters show up, I'd suggest that the first snippet may be written as: resultaten = [accuracy(x) for x in itertools.permutations(['defaultTagger','unigramTag', 'bigramTag','trigramTag'], 3)] – tokland Mar 4 '11 at 14:14
    
@Rod true, i edited it to make it more understandable but forgot to edit the rest, fixed it now. @ tokland, thanks for your suggestion that will make it easier to read!! Any ideas on the problem with the functions? – Javaaaa Mar 4 '11 at 14:17
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not shure if I understood what you need, but you can use the methods you want to call themselves instead of strings - sou your code could become soemthing like:

permutaties = itertools.permutations([nltk.UnigramTagger, nltk.BigramTagger, nltk.TrigramTagger, nltk.DefaultTagger],3)
resultaten = [] 
for element in permutaties:
     resultaten.append(accuracy(element, brown_Train, brown_element))

def accuracy(element, brown_train,brown_element):
     if element is nltk.DeafultTagger:
        evaluator = element("NN")
     else:
        evaluator = element(brown_train, backoff=XXX)  #maybe insert more elif
                    #clauses to retrieve the proper backoff parameter --or you could
                    # usr a tuple in the call to permutations so the apropriate backoff 
                    #is avaliable for each function to be called
     return  evaluator.evaluate(brown_test) # ? I am not shure  from your code if this is your intent
share|improve this answer
    
thanks this brigns me on the right direction! However, the element is a tuple of three methods which then needs to be handled dynamically of you understand what I mean. Your assumption about the retun was very good, that was my intention! – Javaaaa Mar 4 '11 at 14:30
    
ok after playing woht you answer I still can't manage to do it, any ideas people? – Javaaaa Mar 4 '11 at 14:55
    
ok thanks for your answer didn't work out exactly but showed me the right direction, thanks! – Javaaaa Mar 4 '11 at 15:47

Starting with jsbueno's code, I suggest writing a wrapper function for each of the taggers to give them the same signature. And since you only need them once, I suggest using a lambda.

permutaties = itertools.permutations([lambda: ntlk.DefaultTagger("NN"),
                                      lambda: nltk.UnigramTagger(brown_train, backoff),
                                      lambda: nltk.BigramTagger(brown_train, backoff),
                                      lambda: nltk.TrigramTagger(brown_train, backoff)],3)

This would allow you to call each directly, without a special function that figures out which function you're calling and employs the appropriate signature.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes thanks i already did that in my code, didn't include it to be more easy to understand. However, when the first method in an element is DefaultTagger then it will only have to do that by definition since the defaulttagger tags all words in a text with the NN, leaving no need to backoff. But it is a good suggestion anyway. However, I still don't understand how to implement the backoff now. any ideas? – Javaaaa Mar 4 '11 at 15:19

basing on jsbueno code I think that you want to reuse evaluator as the backoff argument so the code should be

permutaties = itertools.permutations([nltk.UnigramTagger, nltk.BigramTagger, nltk.TrigramTagger, nltk.DefaultTagger],3)
resultaten = [] 
for element in permutaties:
     resultaten.append(accuracy(element, brown_Train, brown_element))

def accuracy(element, brown_train,brown_element):
     evaluator = "NN"
     for e in element:
         if evaluator == "NN":
              evaluator = e("NN")
         else:

              evaluator = e(brown_train, backoff=evaluator)  #maybe insert more elif
                    #clauses to retrieve the proper backoff parameter --or you could
                    # usr a tuple in the call to permutations so the apropriate backoff 
                    #is avaliable for each function to be called

     return  evaluator.evaluate(brown_test) # ? I am not shure  from your code if this is your intent
share|improve this answer

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