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Given a string "filename.conf", how to I verify the extension part?

I need a cross platform solution.

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18 Answers 18

up vote 21 down vote accepted

You have to make sure you take care of file names with more then one dot. example: c:\.directoryname\file.name.with.too.many.dots.ext would not be handled correctly by strchr or find.

My favorite would be the boost filesystem library that have an extension(path) function

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7  
Your directory name is easily handled by reverse find though :). –  17 of 26 Sep 9 '08 at 14:33

Is this too simple of a solution?

#include <iostream>
#include<string>

int main()
{
  std::string fn = "filename.conf";
  if(fn.substr(fn.find_last_of(".") + 1) == "conf") {
    std::cout << "Yes..." << std::endl;
  } else {
    std::cout << "No..." << std::endl;
  }
}
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7  
Yes ! See Torlack's answer: stackoverflow.com/a/51993/22689. –  Raphaël Saint-Pierre Dec 2 '11 at 15:41
    
@What happens when file name doesn't have extension and previous folder has . in its name? –  Felics Apr 28 '13 at 19:59
    
I'm answering the question; which specifies "filename.conf", not your hypothetical. –  brian newman May 17 '13 at 2:40
1  
By that logic, you could just say return "Yes..."; with no check at all - it's implied that the solution should work for other inputs. As another counter example, a file named simply "conf" with no extension would also return "Yes..." given the above. –  Rollie Jul 5 '13 at 20:43
1  
Warning to others: This is too simple of a solution to be used in production code except for narrow and specific projects that do not need to handle a variety of real-world end user scenarios. File name parsing and handling is non-trivial. I personally almost always use boost::filesystem, which is trivial to use, but provides the necessary support. See boost.org/doc/libs/1_55_0/libs/filesystem/doc/index.htm –  Dan Nissenbaum Apr 2 at 9:33

The best way is to not write any code that does it but call existing methods. In windows, the PathFindExtension method is probably the simplest.

So why would you not write your own?

Well, take the strrchr example, what happens when you use that method on the following string "c:\program files\AppleGate.Net\readme"? Is ".Net\readme" the extension? It is easy to write something that works for a few example cases, but can be much harder to write something that works for all cases.

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+1 Writing no new code is often the best answer! The C# version of this was what I was after just now, but your answer got me there. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Tom Resing Aug 4 '11 at 14:53
    
This function (under Windows 7) will not properly handle "file.i i". Yes, this is valid, notice the space. –  pcunite Aug 27 '13 at 18:21
    
He has asked about retrieving the extension from a file, not a full path. In addition, a Windows API function would not be a good answer. This is absolutely not an answer, but a comment. –  Dídac Pérez Sep 27 '13 at 9:55
    
-1 for providing a platform-specific solution when a portable solution was requested by the OP. –  Jamie Bullock May 22 at 15:35
    
+1 From me. This question is the first one that comes up when you google 'mfc get file extension', and yours is the simplest answer that works. –  Eternal21 Aug 19 at 13:10

Assuming you have access to STL:

std::string filename("filename.conf");
std::string::size_type idx;

idx = filename.rfind('.');

if(idx != std::string::npos)
{
    std::string extension = filename.substr(idx+1);
}
else
{
    // No extension found
}

Edit: This is a cross platform solution since you didn't mention the platform. If you're specifically on Windows, you'll want to leverage the Windows specific functions mentioned by others in the thread.

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2  
+1, this is the simplest solution in case you have a file in a string and not a path! –  Andreas Bonini Jan 20 '10 at 20:55

Someone else mentioned boost but I just wanted to add the actual code to do this:

#include <boost/filesystem.hpp>
using std::string;
string texture         = foo->GetTextureFilename();
string file_extension  = boost::filesystem::extension(texture);
cout << "attempting load texture named " << texture
     << "    whose extensions seems to be " 
     << file_extension << endl;
// Use JPEG or PNG loader function, or report invalid extension
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actually the STL can do this without much code, I advise you learn a bit about the STL because it lets you do some fancy things, anyways this is what I use.

std::string GetFileExtension(const std::string& FileName)
{
    if(FileName.find_last_of(".") != std::string::npos)
        return FileName.substr(FileName.find_last_of(".")+1);
    return "";
}

this solution will always return the extension even on strings like "this.a.b.c.d.e.s.mp3" if it cannot find the extension it will return "".

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I've stumbled onto this question today myself, even though I already had a working code I figured out that it wouldn't work in some cases.

While some people already suggested using some external libraries, I prefer to write my own code for learning purposes.

Some answers included the method I was using in the first place (looking for the last "."), but I remembered that on linux hidden files/folders start with ".". So if file file is hidden and has no extension, the whole file name would be taken for extension. To avoid that I wrote this piece of code:

bool getFileExtension(const char * dir_separator, const std::string & file, std::string & ext)
{
    std::size_t ext_pos = file.rfind(".");
    std::size_t dir_pos = file.rfind(dir_separator);

    if(ext_pos>dir_pos+1)
    {
        ext.append(file.begin()+ext_pos,file.end());
        return true;
    }

    return false;
}

I haven't tested this fully, but I think that it should work.

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Actually, the easiest way is

char* ext;
ext = strrchr(filename,'.') 

One thing to remember: if '.' doesn't exist in filename, ext will be NULL.

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1  
This would not be perfect solution for UNIX hidden files that start with dot –  Mark Kahn Mar 2 at 11:01

_splitpath, _wsplitpath, _splitpath_s, _wsplitpath_w

I think this is Windows (Platform SDK) only?

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Using std::string's find/rfind solves THIS problem, but if you work a lot with paths then you should look at boost::filesystem::path since it will make your code much cleaner than fiddling with raw string indexes/iterators.

I suggest boost since it's a high quality, well tested, (open source and commercially) free and fully portable library.

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A Visual C++ version using System::String

   System::String^ GetFileExtension(System::String^ FileName)
   {
       int Ext=FileName->LastIndexOf('.');
       if( Ext != -1 )
           return FileName->Substring(Ext+1);
       return "";
   }
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For char array-type strings you can use this:

#include <ctype.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{
    char filename[] = "apples.bmp";
    char extension[] = ".jpeg";

    if(compare_extension(filename, extension) == true)
    {
        // .....
    } else {
        // .....
    }

    return 0;
}

bool compare_extension(char *filename, char *extension)
{
    /* Sanity checks */

    if(filename == NULL || extension == NULL)
        return false;

    if(strlen(filename) == 0 || strlen(extension) == 0)
        return false;

    if(strchr(filename, '.') == NULL || strchr(extension, '.') == NULL)
        return false;

    /* Iterate backwards through respective strings and compare each char one at a time */

    for(int i = 0; i < strlen(filename); i++)
    {
        if(tolower(filename[strlen(filename) - i - 1]) == tolower(extension[strlen(extension) - i - 1]))
        {
            if(i == strlen(extension) - 1)
                return true;
        } else
            break;
    }

    return false;
}

Can handle file paths in addition to filenames. Works with both C and C++. And cross-platform.

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I think THIS is what you need :)

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Try to use strstr

char* lastSlash;
lastSlash = strstr(filename, ".");
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Or you can use this:

    char *ExtractFileExt(char *FileName)
    {
        std::string s = FileName;
        int Len = s.length();
        while(TRUE)
        {
            if(FileName[Len] != '.')
                Len--;
            else
            {
                char *Ext = new char[s.length()-Len+1];
                for(int a=0; a<s.length()-Len; a++)
                    Ext[a] = FileName[s.length()-(s.length()-Len)+a];
                Ext[s.length()-Len] = '\0';
                return Ext;
            }
        }
    }

This code is cross-platform

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If you use Qt library, you can give a try to QFileInfo's suffix()

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1  
What does Qt have to do with this question? Why introduce a large third-party dependency for a simple string manipulation? If going that route, why not just use boost? –  derpface Jul 15 at 15:17

Here's a function that takes a path/filename as a string and returns the extension as a string. It is all standard c++, and should work cross-platform for most platforms.

Unlike several other answers here, it handles the odd cases that windows' PathFindExtension handles, based on PathFindExtensions's documentation.

wstring get_file_extension( wstring filename )
{
    size_t last_dot_offset = filename.rfind(L'.');
    // This assumes your directory separators are either \ or /
    size_t last_dirsep_offset = max( filename.rfind(L'\\'), filename.rfind(L'/') );

    // no dot = no extension
    if( last_dot_offset == wstring::npos )
        return L"";

    // directory separator after last dot = extension of directory, not file.
    // for example, given C:\temp.old\file_that_has_no_extension we should return "" not "old"
    if( (last_dirsep_offset != wstring::npos) && (last_dirsep_offset > last_dot_offset) )
        return L"";

    return filename.substr( last_dot_offset + 1 );
}
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Good answers but I see most of them has some problems: First of all I think a good answer should work for complete file names which have their path headings, also it should work for linux or windows or as mentioned it should be cross platform. For most of answers; file names with no extension but a path with a folder name including dot, the function will fail to return the correct extension: examples of some test cases could be as follow:

    const char filename1 = {"C:\\init.d\doc"}; // => No extention
    const char filename2 = {"..\\doc"}; //relative path name => No extention
    const char filename3 = {""}; //emputy file name => No extention
    const char filename4 = {"testing"}; //only single name => No extention
    const char filename5 = {"tested/k.doc"}; // normal file name => doc
    const char filename6 = {".."}; // parent folder => No extention
    const char filename7 = {"/"}; // linux root => No extention
    const char filename8 = {"/bin/test.d.config/lx.wize.str"}; // ordinary path! => str

"brian newman" suggestion will fail for filename1 and filename4. and most of other answers which are based on reverse find will fail for filename1. I suggest including the following method in your source: which is function returning index of first character of extension or the length of given string if not found.

size_t find_ext_idx(const char* fileName)
{
    size_t len = strlen(fileName);
    size_t idx = len-1;
    for(size_t i = 0; *(fileName+i); i++) {
        if (*(fileName+i) == '.') {
            idx = i;
        } else if (*(fileName + i) == '/' || *(fileName + i) == '\\') {
            idx = len - 1;
        }
    }
    return idx+1;
}

you could use the above code in your c++ application like below:

std::string ext(filename1 + find_ext_idx(filename1));

The last point in some cases the a folder is given to file name as argument and includes a dot in the folder name the function will return folder's dot trailing so better first to user check that the given name is a filename and not folder name.

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