Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to wrap my head around the whole Parallel Programming concept, mostly focusing on Tasks, so I've been trying this scenario where, say, up to 9 Parallel Tasks would perform their work for a random period of time:

/// <remarks>
/// A big thank you to the awesome community of StackOverflow for 
/// their advice and guidance with this sample project
/// http://stackoverflow.com/questions/5195486/
/// </remarks>

RNGCryptoServiceProvider random = new RNGCryptoServiceProvider();
byte[] buffer = new byte[4];
random.GetBytes(buffer);

// Creates a random number of tasks (not less than 2 -- up to 9)
int iteration = new Random(BitConverter.ToInt32(buffer, 0)).Next(2,9);
Console.WriteLine("Creating " + iteration + " Parallel Tasks . . .");
Console.Write(Environment.NewLine);

Dictionary<int, string> items = new Dictionary<int, string>();

for (int i = 1; i < iteration + 1; i++) // cosmetic +1 to avoid "Task N° 0"
{
    items.Add(i, "Task # " + i);
}

List<Task> tasks = new List<Task>();

// I guess we should use a Parallel.Foreach() here
foreach (var item in items)
{
    // Creates a random interval to pause the thread at (up to 9 secs)
    random.GetBytes(buffer);
    int interval = new Random(BitConverter.ToInt32(buffer, 0)).Next(1000, 9000);

    var temp = item;
    var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(state =>
    {
        Console.WriteLine(String.Format(temp.Value + " will be completed in {0} miliseconds . . .", interval));
        Thread.Sleep(interval);

        return "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.";

    }, temp.Value).ContinueWith(t => Console.WriteLine(String.Format("{0} returned: {1}", t.AsyncState, t.Result)));

    tasks.Add(task);
}

Task.WaitAll(tasks.ToArray());

But unfortunately they're being handled sequentially instead of in parallel.

I'd be really glad if you guys could help me out here -- maybe I should use a Parallel.ForEach instead of a regular one?

Again any advice would be really appreciated.

EDIT Updated the code sample twice to reflect the contributions from the commenters.

share|improve this question
    
Thanks for the heads up Sam! –  Nano Taboada Mar 4 '11 at 16:43
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Calling Task.Result blocks. Since you're doing that inside your foreach over items you end up creating one task and then waiting for it to finish before moving to the next item.

try moving the call to Task.Result outside that foreach

List<Task<string>> tasks = new List<Task<string>>();


foreach (var item in items)
{
    random.GetBytes(buffer);
    int interval = new Random(BitConverter.ToInt32(buffer, 0)).Next(1000, 9000);

    var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(state =>
    {
        Console.WriteLine(String.Format(item.Value + " will be completed in {0} miliseconds . . .", interval));
        Thread.Sleep(interval);

        return "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.";

    }, item.Value);

    tasks.Add(task);
}

foreach (var task in tasks)
{
    Console.WriteLine(task.AsyncState + " returned: " + task.Result);
} 

EDIT

As asked for in the comments. Here is a version that would print the result as each task finishes by using ConinueWith. The task list can now be a List<Task> again as well. The WaitAll call is still needed at the end to make sure the method doesn't return until each task is done, but each task will print it's result as it finishes.

RNGCryptoServiceProvider random = new RNGCryptoServiceProvider();
byte[] buffer = new byte[4];
random.GetBytes(buffer);

// Creates a random number of tasks (not less than 2 -- up to 9)
int iteration = new Random(BitConverter.ToInt32(buffer, 0)).Next(2, 9);
Console.WriteLine("Creating " + iteration + " Parallel Tasks . . .");

Dictionary<int, string> items = new Dictionary<int, string>();

for (int i = 1; i < iteration + 1; i++) // cosmetic +1 to avoid "Task N° 0"
{
    items.Add(i, "Parallel Task N° " + i);
}

List<Task> tasks = new List<Task>();

// I guess we should use a Parallel.Foreach() here
foreach (var item in items)
{
    // Creates a random interval to pause the thread at (up to 9 secs)
    random.GetBytes(buffer);
    int interval = new Random(BitConverter.ToInt32(buffer, 0)).Next(1000, 9000);

    // http://stackoverflow.com/questions/5195486/
    var temp = item;
    var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(state =>
    {
        Console.WriteLine(String.Format(temp.Value + " will be completed in {0} miliseconds . . .", interval));
        Thread.Sleep(interval);

        return "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.";

    }, temp.Value).ContinueWith(t => Console.WriteLine(t.AsyncState + " returned: " + t.Result));
    tasks.Add(task);
}

Task.WaitAll(tasks.ToArray());
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks much for the comment Mike! It does makes sense to me but the problem is <code>task.Result</code> is not reachable outside the scope of such foreach loop. –  Nano Taboada Mar 4 '11 at 16:47
    
@Nano - It should be reachable. You're storing each task in a list of tasks and that list is created outside the loop. It should be a List<Task<string>> instead of List<Task>. That's the problem. There is no Result property on 'Task' but there is one on Task<TResult> –  Mike Two Mar 4 '11 at 17:18
    
it works now, thanks! Still not quite the desired output though as it is showing all the results at the same time, the sample was more intended to show a sort of report-as-soon-as-finished behavior –  Nano Taboada Mar 4 '11 at 18:00
    
@Nano - glad it helped. You can use the ContinueWith method on task to tell it what to do when it is done. I'll update the code to show it. –  Mike Two Mar 4 '11 at 18:25
    
@Nano - also note that the var temp = item line is necessary, but only for the Console.WriteLine that produces the "Parallel Task N x will be completed in ..." line. The code inside the ContinueWith will get the right value without copying item. Remove it to see that the "will be completed" message only holds the last items value but the "quick brown fox" message will be correct. –  Mike Two Mar 4 '11 at 18:41
add comment

You're calling task.Result on each task in the loop... which means it's going to wait for the result of one task before creating the next one. Try this instead:

// Create all the tasks
foreach (var item in items)
{
    // ... Create and start tasks as before
    tasks.Add(task);
}

// Now wait for them all, printing the results
foreach (var task in tasks)
{
    Console.WriteLine(task.AsyncState + " returned: " + task.Result);
}

Now this will block on the first task created immediately - so even if (say) the 5th one completes much earlier, you won't see any results until the 1st one has completed... but they will be executing in parallel.

Next you'll want to change your loop like this:

foreach (var item in items)
{
    var itemCopy = item;
    // Use itemCopy in here instead of item
}

as otherwise you're capturing the loop variable, which is considered harmful (part 1; part 2).

But yes, you probably should use Parallel.ForEach instead. It's worth understanding why it was failing before though.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your comment Jon! I'm actually updating the sample now. Although I'm still having issues trying to access <code>task.Result</code> outside the scope of the loop -- Should I probably collect all the return values in a more accessible type? –  Nano Taboada Mar 4 '11 at 16:59
    
@Nano: I've given you an example of displaying the task results - because you're storing references to every task you create in the tasks list. That's how you get at them outside the creation loop. –  Jon Skeet Mar 4 '11 at 17:10
    
thanks much for that. I was wondering what would be the way to show each result but as soon as any task finishes? -- that was certainly the purpose of randomizing each thread's lifespan. –  Nano Taboada Mar 4 '11 at 18:04
    
@Nano: You could consider using Task.ContinueWith to add a continuation to each task, or use Task.WhenAny to wait for any task to complete. –  Jon Skeet Mar 4 '11 at 21:10
add comment

Since you are calling task.Result on each Task you are creating a Blocking Call that is causing the loop to wait until that task returns.

You should create all of the tasks first and then read the results in a separate loop.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.