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How can I validate numeric input arguments to a tcsh script?

#!/usr/bin/tcsh

if ( $1 < 0.0 ) then
    echo "ERROR: first input argument is less than zero."
    exit 1
endif

The above snippet shows what I'm trying to do but doesn't work. I have tried MANY combinations based on using the expr command or the @ operator to no avail. The man page and the web have turned up nothing yet. No matter what I try I keep getting errors like "Badly formed number" or "set: Variable name must begin with a letter".

Is there a tcsh-ish way of doing this? I could certainly hack something up using awk or watever but that seems kind of silly.

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Tcsh doesn't do floats. You can use bc or awk:

#!/usr/bin/tcsh
if ( `echo "$1 < 0.0" | bc` == 1 ) then
    echo "ERROR: first input argument is less than zero."
    exit 1
endif

or

#!/usr/bin/tcsh
if ( `awk -v "val=$1" 'BEGIN {print val < 0.0}'` == 1 ) then
    echo "ERROR: first input argument is less than zero."
    exit 1
endif
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. That works. I had found something similar to your awk line but I was really hoping there was a "nicer" way. I was starting to suspect that tcsh can't handle floats and you seem to have confirmed that. Bummer. My relevant line was "if ( echo $1 | awk '{print $1<0.0}' == 1 ) then". Ugh. I refuse to switch to bash, which only a sadomasochist would volunteer to use. I need to bite the bullet and check out zsh or something else. –  Dr. Person Person II Mar 4 '11 at 16:26
    
@Dr.PersonPersonII: Speaking of sadomasochism. I'm curious about the particulars of why you don't like Bash. Bash doesn't do floats either, by the way. Both zsh and ksh93 do. –  Dennis Williamson Mar 4 '11 at 16:36
    
I find the bash syntax very unintuitive and difficult to remember. If I go a month or more without writing a bash script, which is typical, I have to Google to figure out the syntax for every thing I want to do. Csh on the other hand is much easier to actually use. I'm aware of some of the limitations of the csh but I still find it more pleasant to use. –  Dr. Person Person II Mar 4 '11 at 19:26
    
@Dr.PersonPersonII: The syntax of zsh is very much like Bash, ksh, the Bourne shell, etc., since they're all related. However, you'll find zsh much more of a challenge since it not only includes the kitchen sink, but the bathroom sink, the janitor's sink, the ... –  Dennis Williamson Mar 4 '11 at 20:09
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