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I have the following problem:

  1. I have a given number of identically formed items with different colors (I know how many there are from each color)
  2. I pack these items into boxes that can hold each a given number (n) of item in such way that I use the minimum number of boxes: round_up(total_nr_of_items/n)
  3. There are some colors I am not allowed to put in one box except if I can't otherwise have the ideal number of boxes.
  4. There is a minimal number of items from each color (different for each color) that I'm allowed to put in a box. That is I can decide to put 0 pcs. of a color into a box or a minimum of k pcs. or above. This constraint can also be broken (as few times as possible) if the packing could not be done with the minimum number of boxes.
  5. I want to find a solution where as few colors as possible are split between boxes.

I think this is a kind of packing problem but I don't know which one.

Please suggest into which packing problem can the above be converted into and/or an algorithm that I could use to solve this problem.

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I have removed the artificial-intelligence tag: What has this got to do with AI? –  Aryabhatta Mar 4 '11 at 16:35
    
Strange. I did not intend to put an AI tag on the question. Anyway, thanks for fixing it. –  Andris Mar 4 '11 at 16:39
    
Sorry it wasn't you. It was edited in later by someone else. –  Aryabhatta Mar 4 '11 at 16:52
    
@Moron I didn't add the AI tag, but afaik, the Bin Packing problem requires a Search algorithm, which is considered an artificial intelligence algorithm according to wikipedia (and most of the people here). –  Geoffrey De Smet Mar 7 '11 at 8:10
    
@Geoff: I think it is a bad idea to start tagging questions based on the techniques used by the possible solutions. The tag is for the question. By tagging it AI, you only serve to cut down on the possible answers one might get. Besides, the techniques are heavily used by AI does not mean it is an AI algorithm. For instance A* is heavily used by AI, you don't call it an AI algorithm. Anyway... –  Aryabhatta Mar 7 '11 at 15:26
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Looks like an NP-Hard constraint satisfaction problem. You'll have hard and soft constraints something like this.

Build-in constraints:

  • I have a given number of identically formed items with different colors (I know how many there are from each color)

Hard constraints:

  • There are some colors I am not allowed to put in one box.

  • There is a minimal number of items from each color (different for each color) that I'm allowed to put in a box. That is I can decide to put 0 pcs. of a color into a box or a minimum of k pcs. or above.

Soft constraints:

  • I pack these items into boxes that can hold each a given number (n) of item in such way that I use the minimum number of boxes: round_up(total_nr_of_items/n)

Softer constraints (or really low weight soft constraints):

  • I want to find a solution where as few colors as possible are split between boxes.

For algorithms to solve this, take a look at Simulated annealing, Tabu search, Branch and bound, ...

For software which implements such algorithms and support constraints, take a look at Drools Planner (java, open source).

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This could be NP-Hard.

The partition problem (for positive integers) seems to reduce to it.

Given an array of positive integers A[1,...n] of which we need to find some subset has the same sum as its complement.

Consider your colours to be 1 to n. You have two boxes. the minimum a box can hold for colour i is A[i] and you have exactly A[i] items of colour i.

The max number of items each box can hold is (A[1] + .. + A[n])/2.

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I think you are right. The 3-partition problem is NP-complete so my best course of action would be a backtracking. Thanks. –  Andris Mar 4 '11 at 17:13
    
@Andris: Even the two partition will suffice to prove NP-Hardness I think. –  Aryabhatta Mar 4 '11 at 17:14
    
But yes, the 3 partition will probably prove the "Strong" NP-Hardness... –  Aryabhatta Mar 4 '11 at 17:22
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