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what's the difference in executing below query with and without GO keyword

use hello


use hello
GO

i am using use database query, it could be insert, select or any query.

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1  
Didn't you sort of already ask this? stackoverflow.com/questions/5190405/… –  Brandon Mar 4 '11 at 16:07
    
stackoverflow.com/q/5190405/102112 –  Alex Mar 4 '11 at 16:08
    
I assume from your tags this concerns SQL Server 2005, though it would be best to state that in the question itself. It is also necessary to know what database "client" or API you are using. Again the tags suggest you may be doing queries programmatically (e.g. ADO.NET), but the syntax "GO" you ask about can be used with an interactive query tool. GO is not a Transact-SQL command, but rather syntax recognized by sqlcmd and isql/osql utilities as signifying the end of a batch of T-SQL commands. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms188037.aspx –  hardmath Mar 4 '11 at 16:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It depends on how it is executed. If you simply execute use hello in SSMS, it is equivalent to

use hello;
GO

I.e., when you execute a statement by itself, it is being executed as its own batch. However, if you execute the following SSMS:

use hello;
GO
Select 'hello'

, you are executing two batches which are separated by the GO keyword. From C#, outside of using the SQL Server SMO, you cannot execute a script with multiple batches using a Command object (e.g. SqlCommand). I.e., when you use a Command object from C#, it cannot contain the GO keyword.

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GO isn't actually part of the query for SQL. Tools like SSMS use it to know in a block of statements to send them individidually. So think of GO as a seperator.

So..

SELECT ...

GO

SELECT ...

Will be sent to SQL as two seperate commands and not just one.

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