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I have some HTML that would have elements with multiple classes, and I need to assign them within one rule, so that the same classes could be different within different containers. Say I have this in my CSS:

.border-blue {
    border: 1px solid blue;
}
.background {
    background: url(bg.gif);
}

Then I have this in my HTML:

<div class='border-blue background'>Lorum Crap No-one Cares About Ipsum</div>

Can I target these within a single rule? Like this, for example, which I know doesn't work:

.border-blue, .background {
    border: 1px solid blue;
    background: url(bg.gif);
}
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3 Answers

up vote 31 down vote accepted

Using .border-blue.background { ... } has always worked for me

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Thanks! I didn't know if this was possible, so I was asking here to find out. –  Tanner Ottinger Mar 4 '11 at 16:41
    
Does it work for your situation? –  Vian Esterhuizen Mar 4 '11 at 16:42
    
Yep. –  Tanner Ottinger Mar 4 '11 at 17:11
    
Glad to help :) –  Vian Esterhuizen Mar 4 '11 at 17:13
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Just in case someone stumbles upon this like I did and doesn't realise, the two variations above are for different use cases.

The following:

.blue-border, .background {
    border: 1px solid #00f;
    background: #fff;
}

is for when you want to add styles to elements that have either the blue-border or background class, for example:

<div class="blue-border">Hello</div>
<div class="background">World</div>
<div class="blue-border background">!</div>

would all get a blue border and white background applied to them.

However, the accepted answer is different.

.blue-border.background {
    border: 1px solid #00f;
    background: #fff;
}

This applies the styles to elements that have both classes so in this example only the <div> with both classes should get the styles applied (in browsers that interpret the CSS properly):

<div class="blue-border">Hello</div>
<div class="background">World</div>
<div class="blue-border background">!</div>

So basically think of it like this, comma separating applies to elements with one class OR another class and dot separating applies to elements with one class AND another class.

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This was a very helpful answer that I almost didn't read. Cheers! –  psicopoo Dec 7 '12 at 14:34
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Yes this is the correct answer

.border-blue, .background {
    border: 1px solid blue;
    background: url(bg.gif);
}
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Really? The other one worked fine. It just took out the , . Plus, I think the other one is a little easier to figure out, with shared code. –  Tanner Ottinger Mar 4 '11 at 17:11
    
@tamer separating by comma is the right way of doing it, It easier to read when looking at your CSS and it's what is considered as a good practice. The other method you choose is a bad way of doing it. You can read more about it searching google on how to combine classes. Here's a link smileycat.com/miaow/archives/000152.php –  Hussein Mar 4 '11 at 17:20
    
@tamer You can also check this link learn-css-tutorial.com/CSS-Best-Practices.cfm –  Hussein Mar 4 '11 at 17:27
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