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I have an attribute whose constructor takes two strings. I would like to make the second string an optional parameter. If the user of the attribute does not supply a value for the second parameter, its value should be equal to the name of the field possesing the attribute. How could I achieve that?


Here is my code:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Field, AllowMultiple = false)]
public class WSFieldAttribute : Attribute
{
    private string tableField;
    private string xmlField;

    public WSFieldAttribute(string tableField, string xmlField)
    {
        this.tableField = tableField;
        this.xmlField   = xmlField;
    }

    public object this[DataRow row]
    {
        get { return row[this.tableField]; }
    }

    public object this[XmlWriter writer]
    {
        set
        {
            string toString;

            if (value.GetType() == typeof(string))
                toString = (string)value;
            else if (value.GetType() == typeof(DateTime))
                toString = Utilities.FormatDate((DateTime)value);
            else if (value.GetType() == typeof(DateTime?))
                toString = Utilities.FormatDate((DateTime?)value);
            else
                toString = value.ToString();

            writer.WriteAttributeString(this.xmlField, toString);
        }
    }
}

public class FieldDefinition
{
    private FieldInfo        fieldInfo;
    private WSFieldAttribute wsField;

    public FieldDefinition(FieldInfo fieldInfo)
    {
        object[] customAttributes = fieldInfo.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(WSFieldAttribute), false);

        if (customAttributes.Length != 1)
            throw new InvalidProgramException();

        this.fieldInfo = fieldInfo;
        this.wsField = (WSFieldAttribute)customAttributes[0];
    }

    public object this[DataRow row]
    {
        get { return wsField[row]; }
    }

    public string this[XmlWriter writer]
    {
        set { wsField[writer] = value; }
    }

    public void Read(object element, DataRow row)
    {
        fieldInfo.SetValue(element, this.wsField[row]);
    }

    public void Write(object element, XmlWriter writer)
    {
        this.wsField[writer] = fieldInfo.GetValue(element);
    }
}

public class Row<T> : IXmlSerializable where T : class, new()
{
    private static Type type;
    private static LinkedList<FieldDefinition> fieldDefinitions;

    static Row()
    {
        type = typeof(T);

        FieldInfo[] fieldInfos = type.GetFields(BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance);

        foreach (FieldInfo fieldInfo in fieldInfos)
            fieldDefinitions.AddLast(new FieldDefinition(fieldInfo));
    }

    private T element;

    public Row(DataRow row)
    {
        this.element = new T();

        foreach (FieldDefinition fieldDefinition in fieldDefinitions)
            fieldDefinition.Read(element, row);
    }

    XmlSchema IXmlSerializable.GetSchema() { return null; }

    void IXmlSerializable.ReadXml(XmlReader reader) { throw new NotImplementedException(); }

    void IXmlSerializable.WriteXml(XmlWriter writer)
    {
        foreach (FieldDefinition fieldDefinition in fieldDefinitions)
            fieldDefinition.Write(element, writer);
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Just a point. Attribute classes should be named <something>Attribute by convention. –  James Gaunt Mar 4 '11 at 17:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Although you can't do that, the code that processes the attribute can check the second string, and, if it's null, get the field name that this attribute is applied to.

Simple solution for your example:

public class WSField : Attribute {
  // ...
  internal string xmlField;
  public WSField(string tableField, string xmlField = null) {

...

public class FieldDefinition {
  public FieldDefinition(FieldInfo fieldInfo) {
    // ...
    if (this.wsField.xmlField == null) this.wsField.xmlField = fieldInfo.Name;
  }

...
share|improve this answer
    
No, not really without breaking encapsulation. I'll post my code to show why. –  Eduardo León Mar 4 '11 at 17:28
1  
If you want to encapsulate the logic of reverting to the field name you could write a static method on WSField that took a FieldInfo and returned the fields WSField attribute (injecting the field name if it's not set in the attribute already). –  James Gaunt Mar 4 '11 at 17:43
    
@James Gaunt: this would make the code much better! –  Jordão Mar 4 '11 at 17:46
    
internal is ugly, but at least this works. –  Eduardo León Mar 4 '11 at 19:27
    
That's why I put simple solution.... You can improve it by using properties and better abstractions. –  Jordão Mar 4 '11 at 19:46

I don't believe you can, I'm afraid. As far as I'm aware, there's no way of going from an attribute instead to the member (or whatever) it's applied to.

share|improve this answer
    
Meh, never mind. Thanks for the info. –  Eduardo León Mar 4 '11 at 17:24

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