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Is there a way to force NSMutableArray to hold one specific object type only?

I have classes definitions as follow:

@interface Wheel:NSObject  
{    
  int size;  
  float diameter;  
}  
@end  


@interface Car:NSObject  
{  
   NSString *model;  
   NSString *make;  
   NSMutableArray *wheels;  
}  
@end

How can I force wheels array to hold Wheel objects only with code? (and absolutely not other objects)

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9 Answers 9

up vote 37 down vote accepted

What we really want is parametric polymorphism is you could declare, say, NSMutableArray<NSString>; but alas such is not available.

As another option here is a quick general subclass of NSMutableArray which you init with the kind of object you want in your monomorphic array. This option does not give you static type-checking (in as much as you ever get it in Obj-C), you get runtime exceptions on inserting the wrong type, just as you get runtime exceptions for index out of bounds etc.

This is not thoroughly tested and assumes the documentation on overriding NSMutableArray is correct...

@interface MonomorphicArray : NSMutableArray
{
    Class elementClass;
    NSMutableArray *realArray;
}

- (id) initWithClass:(Class)element andCapacity:(NSUInteger)numItems;
- (id) initWithClass:(Class)element;

@end

And the implementation:

@implementation MonomorphicArray

- (id) initWithClass:(Class)element andCapacity:(NSUInteger)numItems
{
    elementClass = element;
    realArray = [NSMutableArray arrayWithCapacity:numItems];
    return self;
}

- (id) initWithClass:(Class)element
{
    elementClass = element;
    realArray = [NSMutableArray new];
    return self;
}

// override primitive NSMutableArray methods and enforce monomorphism

- (void) insertObject:(id)anObject atIndex:(NSUInteger)index
{
    if ([anObject isKindOfClass:elementClass]) // allows subclasses, use isMemeberOfClass for exact match
    {
        [realArray insertObject:anObject atIndex:index];
    }
    else
    {
        NSException* myException = [NSException
            exceptionWithName:@"InvalidAddObject"
            reason:@"Added object has wrong type"
            userInfo:nil];
        @throw myException;
    }
}

- (void) removeObjectAtIndex:(NSUInteger)index
{
    [realArray removeObjectAtIndex:index];
}

// override primitive NSArray methods

- (NSUInteger) count
{
    return [realArray count];
}

- (id) objectAtIndex:(NSUInteger)index
{
    return [realArray objectAtIndex:index];
}


// block all the other init's (some could be supported)

static id NotSupported()
{
    NSException* myException = [NSException
        exceptionWithName:@"InvalidInitializer"
        reason:@"Only initWithClass: and initWithClass:andCapacity: supported"
        userInfo:nil];
    @throw myException;
}

- (id)initWithArray:(NSArray *)anArray { return NotSupported(); }
- (id)initWithArray:(NSArray *)array copyItems:(BOOL)flag { return NotSupported(); }
- (id)initWithContentsOfFile:(NSString *)aPath { return NotSupported(); }
- (id)initWithContentsOfURL:(NSURL *)aURL { return NotSupported(); }
- (id)initWithObjects:(id)firstObj, ... { return NotSupported(); }
- (id)initWithObjects:(const id *)objects count:(NSUInteger)count { return NotSupported(); }

@end

Use as:

MonomorphicArray *monoString = [[MonomorphicArray alloc] initWithClass:[NSString class] andCapacity:3];

[monoString addObject:@"A string"];
[monoString addObject:[NSNumber numberWithInt:42]]; // will throw
[monoString addObject:@"Another string"];
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Thanks, that's what I'm looking for. –  Tuyen Nguyen Mar 4 '11 at 19:55
    
+1 — based on this code I got the idea to use blocks to test, if a certain object should be added to an array. This can be a membership for a class, a value for a property of the object or virtual anything else. Please have a look: stackoverflow.com/questions/8190530/… –  vikingosegundo Nov 20 '11 at 1:59
    
Thanks, works great..!! –  Lalith B Dec 12 '12 at 6:15
    
This gives you static type checking: stackoverflow.com/a/8781564/193896 –  bendytree Jan 7 '13 at 23:23
1  
@PaulPraet - NSArray and NSMutableArray are a class cluster and the way they are designed any subclass must provide its own storage for the elements - which can be a separate instance of NSArray/NSMutableArray as used here. See "Subclassing Notes" in the NSArray documentation. –  CRD Nov 20 '13 at 9:21

I could be wrong (I'm a noob), but I think, if you create a custom protocol and make sure the objects you are adding to the array follow the same protocol, then when you declare the array you use

NSArray<Protocol Name>

That should prevent objects being added that do not follow the said protocol.

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1  
Why answer this if you don't know it? –  Dalvik VM Jul 11 '13 at 9:55
2  
It's known as attempting to help fellow programmers. –  Gravedigga Jul 12 '13 at 12:25

as per i know.. before you added any object in wheels mutableArray, u have to add some check mark. Is the object which i am adding is class "wheel". if it is then add, other wise not.

Example:

if([id isClassOf:"Wheel"] == YES)
{
[array addObject:id) 
}

Something like this. i dont remember the exact syntax.

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2  
I agree - don't subclass nsmutablearray - just hide it in your car, and make the only two methods addWheel:(Wheel*)aWheel and deleteWheel:. (for example). –  Tom Andersen Mar 4 '11 at 18:20
    
When I say hide the wheel array, I mean make it private, don't make it a property, etc. You might also need a -(NSArray*)wheels; call, which does this return [NSArray arrayWithArray:wheels]; –  Tom Andersen Mar 4 '11 at 18:22

I don't believe there's any way to do it with NSMutableArray out of the box. You could probably enforce this by subclassing and overriding all the constructors and insertion methods, but it's probably not worth it. What are you hoping to achieve with this?

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That's not possible; an NSArray (whether mutable or not) will hold any object type. What you can do is to create your own custom subclasses as already suggested by Jim. Alternatively, if you wanted to filter an array to remove objects that weren't of the type you want, then you could do:

- (void)removeObjectsFromArray:(NSMutableArray *)array otherThanOfType:(Class)type
{
    int c = 0;
    while(c < [array length])
    {
        NSObject *object = [array objectAtIndex:c];
        if([object isKindOfClass:type])
          c++;
        else
          [array removeObjectAtIndex:c];
    }
}

...
[self removeObjectsFromArray:array otherThanOfType:[Car class]];

Or make other judgments based on the result of isKindOfClass:, e.g. to divide an array containing a mixture of Cars and Wheels into two arrays, each containing only one kind of object.

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You can use the nsexception if you dont have the specific object.

for (int i = 0; i<items.count;i++) {
 if([[items objectAtIndex:i] isKindOfClass:[Wheel class]])
 {
  // do something..!
 }else{
  [NSException raise:@"Invalid value" format:@"Format of %@ is invalid", items];
  // do whatever to handle or raise your exception.
 }
}
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Here's something I've done to avoid subclassing NSMutableArray: use a category. This way you can have the argument and return types you want. Note the naming convention: replace the word "object" in each of the methods you will use with the name of the element class. "objectAtIndex" becomes "wheelAtIndex" and so on. This way there's no name conflict. Very tidy.

typedef NSMutableArray WheelList;
@interface NSMutableArray (WheelList) 
- (wheel *) wheelAtIndex: (NSUInteger) index;
- (void) addWheel: (wheel *) w;
@end

@implementation NSMutableArray (WheelList)

- (wheel *) wheelAtIndex: (NSUInteger) index 
{  
    return (wheel *) [self objectAtIndex: index];  
}

- (void) addWheel: (wheel *) w 
{  
    [self addObject: w];  
} 
@end


@interface Car : NSObject
@property WheelList *wheels;
@end;


@implementation Car
@synthesize wheels;

- (id) init 
{
    if (self = [super init]) {
        wheels = [[WheelList alloc] initWithCapacity: 4];
    }
    return self;
}

@end
share|improve this answer
    
While this works to give you the types it doesn't actually restrict the contents of the array to be the type as you can just call addObject: directly - which means a subsequent wheelAtIndex: could be casting something other than a wheel as a wheel and chaos will ensue. You can combine your approach with MonomorphicArray from the other answer; just extend MonomorphicArray with a class with typed getters and setters. –  CRD Feb 21 '13 at 21:46

protocol maybe a good idea:

@protocol Person <NSObject>
@end

@interface Person : NSObject <Person>
@end

to use:

NSArray<Person>*  personArray;
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Have you test your code?? why NSArray conform Person protocol can do the check? –  johnMa Jan 5 at 9:49
    
the compiler would only give a warning if your object did not conform to the protocol. –  lbsweek Jan 8 at 16:04
    
No, it won't, In fact you will get Incompatible pointer types initializing 'NSArray<Person> *' with an expression of type 'NSArray *',even when you insert Person in it. –  johnMa Jan 9 at 0:59

I hope this will help (and work... :P )

Wheel.h file:

@protocol Wheel
@end

Car.h file:

@interface Car:NSObject  
{  
   NSString *model;  
   NSString *make;  
   NSMutableArray<Car,Optional> *wheels;  
}  
@end
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