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Consider this syntactically correct(?) pseudocode:

class Event {
public:
    virtual int getID() const = 0;
    virtual int getSize() = 0;
    virtual void* getData() = 0;
    virtual void setData() = 0;
    //(I cannot define data at this level 'cos I don't know what it is yet)
}

class SpecialEvent : class Event {
public:
    virtual int getPGNID() const = 0;
    int getSourceAddress() {return source_address;}
    int setSourceAddress(int source_address) {this->source_address = source_address;}
protected:
    int source_address;
}

template <typename T, typename E>
class EventWrapper : public E {
    T data;
public:
    static int EVENT_ID;
    //implements everything in Event...EVENT_ID is assigned at runtime by some registry
}

class AnEvent : public EventWrapper<int, Event> {
     //public methods specific to AnEvent...
}

class AnotherEvent : public EventWrapper<long, SpecialEvent> {
    int getPGNID() const {static int ID = 10; return ID;}
}

class TheProcessingClass {
    AnEvent event1;
    AnotherEvent event2;

    void process(Event& e);
    void process(SpecialEvent& e);

    void doSomething() {
        process(event1);  //should invoke process(Event&)
        process(event2);  //should invoke process(SpecialEvent&)
    }
}

Essentially, I have a wrapper class that wraps data of type T and inherits from some type of E (in this case Event or SpecialEvent)...

I initially was going to create two wrapper classes EventWrapper and SpecialEventWrapper until I figured out that both classes would have the exact same code in it (as long as it was extending from some type of Event)

First off, this sounds like a policy-based design. However, the Events don't have any special behavior...they just hold some data... Am I abusing this pattern?

Second off, is there a better way to do this? I'm oversimplifying things greatly here, but any insights will be appreciated...

EDIT I updated my example...in short, the processing classes are listening for Events and should take action based on the Event. I hope this helps...

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+1 for "syntactically correct pseudocode" =) –  otibom Mar 6 '11 at 22:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I suggest adding process() as a member function of class event.

class Event {
    int getID() const;
    void process();
    //class stuff
}

class SpecialEvent : class Event {
    int getSpecialID() const;
    void process(); //special version of process()
    //class stuff
}


class TheProcessingClass {
    Event event1;
    SpecialEvent event2;

    void doSomething() {
        event1.process();
        event2.process();
    }
}
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I would...but Event really is more or less a POD... –  Tim Reddy Mar 4 '11 at 20:05
    
@T Reddy: So what? If you don't need it to be a POD, make it a member function. –  Puppy Mar 4 '11 at 21:06

I've played with your code for a little while. It looks to me that you are trying to do something very much like boost::any

If not my main advice is to use a true abstract interface for both Event and SpecialEvent. The design you have is only partial polymorphism due to the fact that SpecialEvent has a method, and even more importantly an IDENTITY method, which does not override the Event::getId. That 'feels' very bad and I believe is guaranteed to lead you into difficulties later when you come to depend on the Id concept in any generic way.

In your design you need to establish a clear distinction between class (type) identity and object (instance) identity. So far you appear to be only working with object (instance) identity otherwise your id() method(s) would be static. RTTI may be used for establishing class identity but depending on actual derived types is a classic anti-pattern and usually indicates broken polymorphism. I have never had need of RTTI, not even for logging purposes.

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The key code to answer your question are the two process functions and what they do. Is it incorrect to pass a SpecialEvent or an EventWrapper that is derived from SpecialEvent to the process(Event&) function? If so, then this is not an appropriate use of polymorphism.

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I don't think it is incorrect to pass a SpecialEvent to something that only handles Events...whatever is listening for Events may not care that it is of type SpecialEvent... –  Tim Reddy Mar 6 '11 at 23:00

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