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I'm building a hierarchical collection class that orders magnetic resonance images spatially and arranges them into groupings based on the various acquisition parameters that were used to generate them. The specific method used to perform the grouping is provided by the user of the class. I've abstracted out the relevant features in the sample code below. For the IEquatable<MyClass> implementation, I'd like to be able to compare the _myHelperDelegate attributes of two MyClass instances to determine if both delegates point to the same piece of code. The (_myHelperDelegate == other._myHelperDelegate) clause in the if statement below is clearly the wrong way to go about doing this (it fails to compile, giving the error "Method name expected"). My question is, is there a way to compare two delegates to determine if they reference the same piece of code? If so, how do you do that?

public class MyClass : IEquatable<MyClass>
{
   public delegate object HelperDelegate(args);
   protected internal HelperDelegate _myHelperDelegate;

   public MyClass(HelperDelegate helper)
   {
      ...
      _myHelperDelegate = helper;
   }

   public bool Equals(MyClass other)
   {
      if (
          (_myHelperDelegate == other._myHelperDelegate) &&
          (... various other comparison criteria for equality of two class instances... )
         )
         return true;
      return false;
   }
}
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3  
"I'm building a hierarchical collection class that orders magnetic resonance images spatially" you've lost me. –  Yuriy Faktorovich Mar 4 '11 at 20:00
    
The Delegate class does have an Equals() method (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/99bthb1z(v=VS.90).aspx), did you try that? –  CodingGorilla Mar 4 '11 at 20:03
    
My intuition about the source of the problem was incorrect. The comparison of the two delegates using == actually does work. The problem was a syntax error in the original code. I was missing the && between clauses in the if statement. facepalm –  Matt Mar 4 '11 at 20:34
    
@Yuriy - The spatial arrangement of the images was tangential to the actual problem and could have been omitted without loss of generality, except I wanted to indicate that the comparison of two delegates had a real-world purpose in an attempt to preemptively avoid comments of the, "Why on earth would you want to do that?" variety. –  Matt Mar 4 '11 at 23:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The following compiles and works as expected.

    private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            var helper1 = new TestDelegates.Form1.MyClass.HelperDelegate(Testing);
            var helper2 = new TestDelegates.Form1.MyClass.HelperDelegate(Testing2);
            var myClass1 = new MyClass(helper1);
            var myClass2 = new MyClass(helper1);

            System.Diagnostics.Debug.Print(myClass1.Equals(myClass2).ToString());
//true
            myClass2 = new MyClass(helper2);

            System.Diagnostics.Debug.Print(myClass1.Equals(myClass2).ToString());
//false
        }

        private object Testing()
        {
            return new object();
        }
        private object Testing2()
        {
            return new object();
        }

        public class MyClass : IEquatable<MyClass>
        {
           public delegate object HelperDelegate();
           protected internal HelperDelegate _myHelperDelegate;

           public MyClass(HelperDelegate helper)
           {
             _myHelperDelegate = helper;
           }

           public bool Equals(MyClass other)
           {
              if (_myHelperDelegate == other._myHelperDelegate)
              {
                 return true;
              }
              return false;
           }
        }
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Per msdn, Delegate.Equals method returns:

true if obj and the current delegate have the same targets, methods, and invocation list; otherwise, false.

Have you tried this?

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1  
More likely MulticastDelegate implementation of that method. –  Yuriy Faktorovich Mar 4 '11 at 20:10

I don't see the point in equating two delegates. A delegates role it "give me some x and I don't care how". You are demanding control over the delegates. If you want control, then handle things internally.

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1  
What if you are keeping a list of delegates, let's say for a custom event manager. And then, you wish to detect if a given callback has been assigned multiple times by accident, or if unlistening a callback from an event, you want some way to figure out which exact delegate of a list of delegates to remove. That's what I use it for anyways. –  Dwight May 15 '12 at 18:54

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