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When subclassing a class like MKMapView, is there a preferred way of naming the newly added instance variables? Apple says it reserves the underscore prefix for their own use, so can I just go ahead and use whatever I like without worrying about possible clashes?

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I heard they prefer "Bob" over "Robert." ;-) –  Joshua Nozzi Mar 4 '11 at 20:46

4 Answers 4

You'll want to use a name not used by any of your superclasses — the compiler will error out if you accidentally do and you'll just have to change the variable's name. In general, it's not a very big deal and you can use pretty much whatever you want. It's my observation that category methods are more prone to naming conflict problems than instance variables are.

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To be clearer; Apple reserve the underscore prefix for method names not iVars.

Many developers prefer to name their iVars with an underscore prefix to distinguish them from their property names.

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There's an entire Apple programming guide dedicated to naming conventions and style in Cocoa.

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I've read it through, but section on ivars is very short and doesn't address this very specific problem –  esad Mar 6 '11 at 0:23

Since your subclass will tend to have your own prefix (like EHMapView) you may prefix instance variables with _eh_ (e.g. _eh_foo).

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This actually conflicts with Apple's claim on the underscore prefix. –  Chuck Mar 4 '11 at 20:25
    
I still use the _ prefix for an easy distinction between private variables and public properties. From what I've read on the matter the bigger problem is prefixing private (category) methods. –  Marc Charbonneau Mar 4 '11 at 20:55

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