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I have a database table I am trying to do an UPDATE/INSERT to with a stored procedure. Let's define the table like so:

CREATE TABLE Foo
(
    Id           INT             IDENTITY(1, 1),
    Name         VARCHAR(256)    NOT NULL,
    ShortName    VARCHAR(32),
    Sort         INT
);

I have written a stored procedure similar to the following:

CREATE PROCEDURE Put_Foo
(
    @Id           INT             = NULL OUTPUT,
    @Name         VARCHAR(256),
    @ShortName    VARCHAR(32)     = NULL,
    @Sort         INT             = NULL
)
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    SELECT
        @Id = F.Id
    FROM
        Foo AS F
    WHERE
        F.Name = @Name;

    IF (@Id IS NOT NULL)
    BEGIN
        UPDATE
            Foo
        SET
            ShortName    = @ShortName,
            Sort         = @Sort
        WHERE
            Id = @Id;
    END
    ELSE
    BEGIN
        INSERT
        INTO Foo
        (
            Name,
            ShortName,
            Sort
        )
        VALUES
        (
            @Name,
            @ShortName
            @Sort
        );

        SET @Id = SCOPE_IDENTITY();
    END

    RETURN;
END;

I've greatly simplified the data structures I am dealing with but I hope this serves my point. My question is in regards to how the parameters are processed. Is there a way to determine within the procedure if @Sort was passed in as NULL or set NULL by the default declaration in the parameter list?

EDIT:

The purpose of this is that I don't want NULL parameters to override any columns in the UPDATE statement unless they are explicitly passed in that way.

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Why don't you just make the columns not have defaults? –  Charles Boyung Mar 7 '11 at 21:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, you can't detect how @Sort became NULL. If your goal is to capture when it is explicitly set versus it being set by the default, I would suggest using a different default value (maybe one that wouldn't normally be used, like -1). Then you can assume that if @Sort is NULL, it was explicitly passed in, but if it is -1, you know it was set by default.

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That could work but I wanted to be able to generalize out to multiple procedures and parameters. The end goal being I don't want NULL values that aren't explicitly passed in that way to override columns if the UPDATE is reached. –  rpf3 Mar 4 '11 at 20:14
    
If SQL supported overloading procedures you could create 2 versions of the sproc, 1 with the param, and the other without. Alas, it's not possible. –  Tony Casale Mar 4 '11 at 20:19
    
I know...I'm trying to avoid creating multiple procedures per table that are situationally specific –  rpf3 Mar 4 '11 at 20:27
    
Can you give any more context as to what you're trying to accomplish? Detecting how the value was set isn't really a viable option. –  Tony Casale Mar 4 '11 at 20:45

I think this is what your looking for. If one of the parameters is null, it will updatedit with the value in the database. The other option is update one column at a time.

UPDATE Foo         
SET             
      ShortName = ISNULL(@ShortName, ShortName)
     , Sort = ISNULL(@Sort, Sort)
WHERE Id = @Id;
share|improve this answer

Take out the default value and and then the code calling the proc must provide a value (either a real value or NULL)

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I don't want to always have to pass the parameter in though. For instance if I am calling Put_Foo from a page that tries to create a Foo based solely on the Name, it will override ShortName and Sort if there already exists a Foo of the same Name. –  rpf3 Mar 4 '11 at 20:34
    
@rpf: Why would it override it if it created a Foo? I understand, creating = inserting, is it not? –  Andriy M Mar 4 '11 at 21:48

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