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I'm just curious to see what you guys think about this. I heard a bunch of answers passed around the office and I want to see if you guys can have possibly a better one.

Question:

You have two functions outlined below:

function one()
{
    A();
    B();
    C();
}

function two()
{
    A();
    D();
    C();
}

How would you re-write this (anything counts, you could create classes, variables, other methods, anything), to reduce code duplication?

Each of the methods called changes variables that the other functions need to use. Methods A() B() and C() are already defined.

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2  
Definitely use HTML5 because that solves everything. ;-) –  scunliffe Mar 4 '11 at 20:11
    
Should we assume that there are already defined functions A(), B(), C(), and D()? If so, please edit your post and mention that,. –  Tony Casale Mar 4 '11 at 20:12
2  
@scunliffe: No, use JQuery. –  StriplingWarrior Mar 4 '11 at 20:13
    
Yes...and edited. –  slandau Mar 4 '11 at 20:13
1  
Anything counts? If breaking code is included in that I would definitely remove the calls to A and C from two, no more code duplication! :) –  Andrew Clark Mar 4 '11 at 20:14

9 Answers 9

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Not all languages will support this approach, and the syntax of passing a function may vary between those that do, but the concept would be:

function one()
{
    refactored(B);
}

function two()
{
    refactored(D);
}

function refactored(middleMan)
{
    A();
    middleMan();
    C();
}
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This is interesting. Say it's in C# using .NET 4.0 –  slandau Mar 4 '11 at 20:14
    
This is definitely a good approach in some cases. And of course it's possible in C#, you can just pass a delegate as a parameter. –  Ilya Kogan Mar 4 '11 at 20:15
    
@slandau Look into Action. private void refactored(Action middleman) { A(); middleman(); C(); } –  David Ruttka Mar 4 '11 at 20:27

There is no code duplication here. It looks fine.

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Not terrible duplication, but you still have two methods that are basically doing the same thing barring one call. –  slandau Mar 4 '11 at 20:12

Each of the methods called changes variables that the other functions need to use.

I would start by refactoring the entire class to use proper OOP.

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That's the answer part. lol –  slandau Mar 4 '11 at 20:23

There are a number of ways to refactor that code; which I would use depends on the specific application, as it may mean that I need to reconsider things at a higher level, e.g. redefine classes, or at worst review the entire application design because the duplication means I missed some key relationship.

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If your functions one() and two() are really three-liners as in the example, I wouldn't rewrite anything. You would loose readability and make the code much harder to understand for the next guy.

If the calls to A() and C() are actually larger blocks of code... - define a base class with abstract method X() and a concrete function any() { A(); X(); C(); }

  • define a class One where X() is implemented by B()
  • define a class Two where X() is implemented by D()
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Here's one option.

function (triggerA, triggerB, triggerC, triggerD)
{
     A(triggerA);
     B(triggerB);
     C(triggerC);
     D(triggerD);
}

This way you're only calling one function to do it all, and skips whatever you don't need/want to do.

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If you have closures, lambdas etc. available, you could write

function one()
{
    three(B)
}

function two()
{
    three(D);
}

function three(middle) 
{
    A();
    middle();
    C();
}
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You could (but probably shouldn't) make a class where A() is the constructor and C() is the destructor, and have one() and two() be methods of the class calling B() and D() respectively.

I said you probably shouldn't because OOP should be used to write code that makes sense and not for obscure optimization reasons.

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In C++ this is usually accomplished with RAII if the context makes sense... this pattern is usually A() = some init function, C() = some de-init function. There's usually also a context associated that's being initialized or destroyed as well.

   class bar
    {
        bar() {
            A();
        }

        ~bar() {
            C();
        }
    };

    void one() 
    {
        bar barvar;
        B();
    }

    void two()
    {
        bar barvar;
        D();
    }
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That is hard to follow, especially if someone not expert at OO has to inspect the code –  DarenW Oct 26 '12 at 4:22

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