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In an array first we have to find whether a desired number exists in that or not? If not then how will I find nearer number to the given desired number in Java?

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11 Answers 11

An idea:

int nearest = -1;
int bestDistanceFoundYet = Integer.MAX_INTEGER;
// We iterate on the array...
for (int i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
  // if we found the desired number, we return it.
  if (array[i] == desiredNumber) {
    return array[i];
  } else {
    // else, we consider the difference between the desired number and the current number in the array.
    int d = Math.abs(desiredNumber - array[i]);
    if (d < bestDistanceFoundYet) {
      // For the moment, this value is the nearest to the desired number...
      nearest = array[i];
    }
  }
}
return nearest;
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You need to assign d to bestDistanceFound yet - this test will think every number is better, and return the last item in the array regardless. –  Mike Houston Feb 6 '09 at 11:11
    
@Pax> Yeah indeed. I will be more careful next time... –  romaintaz Feb 6 '09 at 12:31
1  
this wasnt exactly my homework but I had to implement this functionality in an elevator simulation using strategy pattern. This helped alot! –  B Woods Feb 27 '12 at 17:26

Another common definition of "closer" is based on the square of the difference. The outline is similar to that provided by romaintaz, except that you'd compute

long d = ((long)desiredNumber - array[i]);

and then compare (d * d) to the nearest distance.

Note that I've typed d as long rather than int to avoid overflow, which can happen even with the absolute-value-based calculation. (For example, think about what happens when desiredValue is at least half of the maximum 32-bit signed value, and the array contains a value with corresponding magnitude but negative sign.)

Finally, I'd write the method to return the index of the value located, rather than the value itself. In either of these two cases:

  • when the array has a length of zero, and
  • if you add a "tolerance" parameter that bounds the maximum difference you will consider as a match,

you can use -1 as an out-of-band value similar to the spec on indexOf.

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@Pete Kirkham: It works now. –  joel.neely Feb 7 '09 at 0:01

If the array is sorted, then do a modified binary search. Basically if you do not find the number, then at the end of search return the lower bound.

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Pseudocode to return list of closest integers.

myList = new ArrayList();          

if(array.length==0) return myList; 

myList.add(array[0]);

int closestDifference = abs(array[0]-numberToFind);

for (int i = 1; i < array.length; i++) {

 int currentDifference= abs(array[i]-numberToFind);

  if (currentDifference < closestDifference) {

    myList.clear();

    myList.add(array[i]);

         closestDifference = currentDifference;

  } else {

    if(currentDifference==closestDifference) {

        if( myList.get(0) !=array[i]) && (myList.size() < 2) {

            myList.add(array[i]);

        }
            }

       }

}

return myList;
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Array.indexOf() to find out wheter element exists or not. If it does not, iterate over an array and maintain a variable which holds absolute value of difference between the desired and i-th element. Return element with least absolute difference.

Overall complexity is O(2n), which can be further reduced to a single iteration over an array (that'd be O(n)). Won't make much difference though.

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-1 There is no such thing as O(2n). It's O(n). I refer you to stackoverflow.com/questions/487258/… –  cletus Feb 6 '09 at 11:06
    
No need to iterate twice. –  Nrj Feb 6 '09 at 11:12
    
I know that. But the constant in front of n can at times make a big difference in otherwise linear-complex algorithm. –  Anton Gogolev Feb 6 '09 at 11:13
    
Finally, someone that understands big-O (@cletus). I swear I almost killed a guy who showed me something O(4n+7). WTF is that???? –  paxdiablo Feb 6 '09 at 11:36
    
@Anton: sorry you're wrong. You really should learn what Big O means or stop regurgitating falsehoods. –  cletus Feb 6 '09 at 12:09

Only thing missing is the semantics of closer.

What do you do if you're looking for six and your array has both four and eight?

Which one is closest?

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Trick question, the answer is seven! –  ArtOfWarfare Sep 18 '12 at 21:24
   int d = Math.abs(desiredNumber - array[i]);
    if (d < bestDistanceFoundYet) {
      // For the moment, this value is the nearest to the desired number...
      nearest = array[i];
    }

In this way you find the last number closer to desired number because bestDistanceFoundYet is constant and d memorize the last value passign the if (d<...).

If you want found the closer number WITH ANY DISTANCE by the desired number (d is'nt matter), you can memorize the last possibile value. At the if you can test

if(d<last_d_memorized){ //the actual distance is shorter than the previous
    // For the moment, this value is the nearest to the desired number...
          nearest = array[i];
    d_last_memorized=d;//is the actual shortest found delta 
}
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A few things to point out:

1 - You can convert the array to a list using

Arrays.asList(yourIntegerArray);

2 - Using a list, you can just use indexOf().

3 - Consider a scenario where you have a list of some length, you want the number closest to 3, you've already found that 2 is in the array, and you know that 3 is not. Without checking the other numbers, you can safely conclude that 2 is the best, because it's impossible to be closer. I'm not sure how indexOf() works, however, so this may not actually speed you up.

4 - Expanding on 3, let's say that indexOf() takes no more time than getting the value at an index. Then if you want the number closest to 3 in an array and you already have found 1, and have many more numbers to check, then it'll be faster to just check whether 2 or 4 is in the array.

5 - Expanding on 3 and 4, I think it might be possible to apply this to floats and doubles, although it would require that you use a step size smaller than 1... calculating how small seems beyond the scope of the question, though.

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// paulmurray's answer to your question is really the best :

// The least square solution is way more elegant, 
// here is a test code where numbertoLookFor
// is zero, if you want to try ...

import java.util.* ;

public class main {
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        int[] somenumbers = {-2,3,6,1,5,5,-1} ;
        ArrayList<Integer> l = new ArrayList<Integer>(10) ;
        for(int i=0 ; i<somenumbers.length ; i++)
        {
            l.add(somenumbers[i]) ;
        }
        Collections.sort(l, 
                new java.util.Comparator<Integer>()
                {
                    public int compare(Integer n1, Integer n2)
                    {
                        return n1*n1 - n2*n2 ;
                    }
                }
        ) ;
        Integer first = l.get(0) ;
        System.out.println("nearest number is " + first) ;  
    }
}
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//This will work

public int nearest(int of, List<Integer> in)
{
int min = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
int closest = of;

for (int v : in) 
{
    final int diff = Math.abs(v - of);

    if (diff < min) 
    {
        min = diff;
        closest = v;
    }
}
return closest;
}
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int[] somenumbers = getAnArrayOfSomenumbers();
int numbertoLookFor = getTheNumberToLookFor();

boolean arrayContainsNumber = 
   new HashSet(Arrays.asList(somenumbers))
      .contains(numbertoLookfor);

It's fast, too.

Oh - you wanted to find the nearest number? In that case:

int[] somenumbers = getAnArrayOfSomenumbers();
int numbertoLookFor = getTheNumberToLookFor();

ArrayList<Integer> l = new ArrayList<Integer>(
  Arrays.asList(somenumbers)
);
Collections.sort(l);
while(l.size()>1) {
  if(numbertoolookfor <= l.get((l.size()/2)-1)) {
    l = l.subList(0, l.size()/2);
  }
  else {
    l = l.subList(l.size()/2, l.size); 
  }
}

System.out.println("nearest number is" + l.get(0));

Oh - hang on: you were after a least squares solution?

Collections.sort(l,  new Comparator<Integer>(){
  public int compare(Integer o1, Integer o2) {
    return (o1-numbertoLookFor)*(o1-numbertoLookFor) - 
           (o2-numbertoLookFor)*(o2-numbertoLookFor);
  }});

System.out.println("nearest number is" + l.get(0));
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