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If I create a constructor function BlahWidget and give it 2 public methods: publicHello and secondHello. I assign publicHello directly inside the widget using 'this' but use the prototype object to assign the secondHello method, what difference does that really make to the behaviour of the 2 methods on the widget?

var BlahWidget = function(){
  this.publicHello = function(){
    alert("Hello");
  }
};

BlahWidget.prototype.secondHello = function(){
  alert("Second Hello");
}

My understanding was that using .prototype allows it to be called by inherited objects. But turns out that this is not the case. Both methods can be called by the inherited function objects, as shown below:

var MiniBlah = function(){

  this.callSupers = function(){
     this.publicHello();    
     this.secondHello();
  }
}


MiniBlah.prototype = new BlahWidget();
MiniBlah.prototype.constructor = MiniBlah;

var x = new MiniBlah();
x.callSupers();//calls both publicHello and secondHello
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The difference is that functions declared on the prototype object are shared across instances of objects created by a constructor function whereas functions declared inside of the body of a constructor function are not, they belong to the object constructed from the function.

What this means in practice is that you could create a load of objects from a constructor function with a function on the prototype doing X, then change that function on the prototype to do Y and all object instances will get the new functionality of the function.

An example

var BlahWidget = function(){
  this.publicHello = function(){
    console.log("Hello");
  }
};

BlahWidget.prototype.secondHello = function(){
  console.log("Second Hello");
}

var blah1 = new BlahWidget();

var blah2 = new BlahWidget();
blah2.publicHello = function() {
    console.log("Goodbye");
}

blah1.secondHello(); // logs SecondHello
blah2.secondHello(); // logs SecondHello

BlahWidget.prototype.secondHello = function(){
  console.log("Second Goodbye");
}

blah1.secondHello(); // logs Second Goodbye
blah2.secondHello(); // logs Second Goodbye

blah1.publicHello(); // logs Hello
blah2.publicHello(); // logs Goodbye
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So you mean you can also use prototypes to override a method, right? –  Onur Yıldırım Aug 24 '11 at 0:03
    
I mean if you change the prototype, you change it for all objects ever constructed from the function, both those already constructed and those not yet constructed. When I think of overriding a method, I think of a derived class overriding a method inherited from the parent class, which isn't the case here, so I wouldn't use that terminology to describe JavaScript's prototypal behaviour. –  Russ Cam Aug 24 '11 at 8:12

Every single instance of "BlahWidget" will have its own distinct copy of the "publicHello" function.

Also, though this is just academic, I'm not sure I'd say that "prototype" is a keyword; it's more like a "special property name".

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