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I have an IQueryable I selected from a database that contains a field called "NewValue". This field will either contain a 0, 1, or 2. I want to replace the value with a string based of which number it is.
i.e 0 = "Active". I know IQueryables aren't used to change values mostly just for querying but I need to use it in the next line to add to the ViewModel

var AssessmentList = assessment                    
.Select(p => new LogManagementViewModel
{
   newValue = p.NewValue,
});

How can I change all the values in assement.NewValue to a string?

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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
var values = new [] {"StrValue1", "StrValue2", "StrValue"};

var AssessmentList = assessment                    
    .AsEnumerable()
    .Select(p => new LogManagementViewModel
        {
            newValue = values[p.NewValue],
        });
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I tried this before and it gave me an error message saying that a LINQ IQueryable cannot contain an array index. I'm paraphrasing I forgot the actual error code –  Loogawa Mar 4 '11 at 20:53
    
@Loogawa - that's what you should start from. In this case add AsEnumerable() call : var AssessmentList = assessment.AsEnumerable().Select(...);` or use some other approach to make it working with SQL –  Snowbear Mar 4 '11 at 20:55
    
That worked great. Although there were a lot of good answers on here I could have done too. The only thing I was missing from my first attempt doing this was the .AsEnumerable(). I still don't really understand how this works though. –  Loogawa Mar 4 '11 at 21:03
    
@Loogawa, the thing is that you have initially an IQueryable interface which Linq-to-Sql or Linq-to-Entities tries to transform into corresponding query. It will work fine if you have simple constructions in query (comparison for example) which can be transformed into SQL. But this values array cannot be transformed into SQL code and that's why you've seen that error. Adding AsEnumerable returns IEnumerable interface and because of that your following statements will be executed via Linq-to-objects which works fine with arrays. –  Snowbear Mar 4 '11 at 21:08
    
okay that makes sense. You have helped me to understand LINQ a lot better thanks! –  Loogawa Mar 4 '11 at 21:11
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var dictionary = new Dictionary<int, string>
{
    { 0, "Active" },
    { 1, "Inactive" },
    // etc
};

var AssessmentList = assessment                    
.Select(p => new LogManagementViewModel
{
    newValue = dictionary[p.NewValue],
});

This would work for mapping between other types as well.

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Easiest and cleanest would be with a mapping method:

string MapToString(int value)
{
    //..
}

var AssessmentList = assessment                    
.Select(p => new LogManagementViewModel
{
   NewValue = MapToString(p.NewValue),
});
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One way:

Add a new computed property onto your class (assuming you have a partial class outside of any generated code). Then that computed class can do the translation however it needs to. Your view model can reference this computed value.

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I would make a constructor overload in your LogManagementViewModel that does that work for you, something like this:

public LogManagementViewModel(int NewValue)
{
  switch(NewValue)
  {
      case 0:
         this.NewValue = "Active";
         break;
       // etc...
  }
}

IMO, this places the logic in it's proper place, let the your view model translate it as it should be, it's not the responsibility of your LINQ/Database queries.

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The problem is I have other things that use the viewModel where it won't be a number, but I think I can test this with extra logic. This is a great idea though. Thanks –  Loogawa Mar 4 '11 at 20:55
    
You can always have multiple constructors, make a constructor that fits each of your requirements. –  CodingGorilla Mar 4 '11 at 20:57
    
I really liked this answer but @snowbear was very close to what I had already done. Just had to add .AsEnumerable() so I will give it to him. But I do like this answer –  Loogawa Mar 4 '11 at 21:01
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