Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The C++0x standard working draft states (section 6.5.4) the following about the begin() and end() calls that are implicit in a range-based for loop:

'begin' and 'end' are looked up with argument-dependent lookup (3.4.2). For the purposes of this name lookup, namespace std is an associated namespace.

The way I read this, this means that the overload resolution set for the calls to begin() and end() includes all of the following:

  • all overloads of begin() and end() that are in scope at the location where the range-based for loop is used (in particular, all overloads in the global namespace will be in scope)
  • all overloads of begin() and end() in namespace std
  • all overloads of begin() and end() in other namespaces associated with their arguments

Is that correct?

g++ 4.6's behaviour does not seem to be consistent with this interpretation. For this code:

#include <utility>

template <typename T, typename U>
T begin(const std::pair<T, U>& p); 

template <typename T, typename U>
U end(const std::pair<T, U>& p); 

int main()
{
    std::pair<int*, int*> p;
    for (int x : p)
        ;
}

It gives the following errors:

adl1.cpp: In function 'int main()':
adl1.cpp:12:18: error: No match for 'begin(pair<int *, int *> &)'
adl1.cpp:12:18: candidate is:
/usr/local/lib/gcc/i686-pc-linux-
    gnu/4.6.0/../../../../include/c++/4.6.0/initializer_list:86:38: template<
        class _Tp> constexpr const _Tp * begin(initializer_list<_Tp>)
adl1.cpp:12:18: error: No match for 'end(pair<int *, int *> &)'
adl1.cpp:12:18: candidate is:
/usr/local/lib/gcc/i686-pc-linux-
    gnu/4.6.0/../../../../include/c++/4.6.0/initializer_list:96:36: template<
        class _Tp> constexpr const _Tp * end(initializer_list<_Tp>)

This suggests that it is considering only the overloads in namespace std, and not the overloads in the global namespace.

If, however, I use my own pair class declared in the global namespace, it compiles fine:

template <typename T, typename U>
struct my_pair
{
    T first;
    U second;
};

template <typename T, typename U>
T begin(const my_pair<T, U>& p); 

template <typename T, typename U>
U end(const my_pair<T, U>& p); 

int main()
{
    my_pair<int*, int*> p;
    for (int x : p)
        ;
}

As a final test, I tried putting my_pair in a separate namespace:

namespace my
{

template <typename T, typename U>
struct my_pair
{
    T first;
    U second;
};

}

template <typename T, typename U>
T begin(const my::my_pair<T, U>& p); 

template <typename T, typename U>
U end(const my::my_pair<T, U>& p); 

int main()
{
    my::my_pair<int*, int*> p;
    for (int x : p)
        ;
}

And again I get the errors:

adl3.cpp: In function 'int main()':
adl3.cpp:22:18: error: 'begin' was not declared in this scope
adl3.cpp:22:18: suggested alternative:
adl3.cpp:14:35:   'begin'
adl3.cpp:22:18: error: 'end' was not declared in this scope
adl3.cpp:22:18: suggested alternative:
adl3.cpp:17:33:   'end'

So it seems it is considering only overloads in namespace std and other associated namespaces, and not overloads that are in scope at the call site (the first bullet point in my list above).

Is this a gcc bug, or am I misinterpreting the standard?

If the latter, does that mean it's impossible to treat an std::pair object as a range in a range-based for loop (without overloading std::begin() and std::end(), which if I'm not mistaken is not allowed)?

share|improve this question
    
I'd suggest retagging it with foreach, since range-based-for-loop is just a more verbose term for it. –  Collin Dauphinee Mar 4 '11 at 23:16
1  
"does that mean it's impossible to treat an std::pair object as a range in a range-based for loop" - I suspect not, because even if you had misinterpreted the standard, C++0x now has partial specialization for function templates. You're not allowed to overload std::begin, but you are allowed to specialize it. –  Steve Jessop Mar 5 '11 at 0:27
    
@Steve: Are you sure C++0x has partial specializations for function templates? I cannot find any mention of them in the draft. –  HighCommander4 Mar 5 '11 at 1:29
    
@HighCommander4: define "sure". But no, I'm not, I'm working from vague memory. Since "class template partial specializations" rate a heading in n3225, and there's no such heading "function template partial specializations" I guess they didn't make it, so if GCC's implementation were correct then you'd be stuck. –  Steve Jessop Mar 5 '11 at 1:47
1  
However, very few people actually write using std::sort; sort(foo.begin(), foo.end());, in order to get your ADL-overloaded version of the algorithm. So generally clients will only get it if they know about it. You're right that therefore in practice there is an inconsistency, since if Foo was just a non-template class then we could sneak in a full specialization of std::sort(Foo::iterator, Foo::iterator), and all users would get that even if they call fully-qualified std::sort(foo.begin(), foo.end()). –  Steve Jessop Mar 8 '11 at 10:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I first reported that this looked like a gcc bug to me. It now appears that even this part of the for-loop specification is unclear, and an inquiry has been opened on the committee.

It still looks like the range-based for-loop rules are going to change very shortly:

http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2011/n3257.pdf

And I'm not sure which option listed in N3257 will be chosen.

share|improve this answer
    
I can see how GCC is doing this, because I find the description entirely confusing. I had the same question posted to usenet some time ago. See groups.google.com/group/comp.lang.c++/browse_thread/thread/… –  Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 5 '11 at 13:44
    
Thanks Johannes. I've modified my answer accordingly. –  Howard Hinnant Mar 5 '11 at 15:08
    
The problem with the specification is a good example of what happens when something is attempted to standardize before being widely used. I hope this get solved soon. –  dsign May 25 '11 at 8:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.