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I want to get the distinct values in a list, but not by the standard equality comparison.

What I want to do is something like this:

return myList.Distinct( (x, y) => x.Url == y.Url );

I can't, there's no extension method in Linq that will do this - just one that takes an IEqualityComparer.

I can hack around it with this:

return myList.GroupBy( x => x.Url ).Select( g => g.First() );

But that seems messy. It also doesn't quite do the same thing - I can only use it here because I have a single key.

I could also add my own:

public static IEnumerable<T> Distinct<T>( 
    this IEnumerable<T> input, Func<T,T,bool> compare )
{
    //write my own here
}

But that does seem rather like writing something that should be there in the first place.

Anyone know why this method isn't there?

Am I missing something?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 40 down vote accepted

It's annoying, certainly. It's also part of my "MoreLINQ" project which I must pay some attention to at some point :) There are plenty of other operations which make sense when acting on a projection, but returning the original - MaxBy and MinBy spring to mind.

As you say, it's easy to write - although I prefer the name "DistinctBy" to match OrderBy etc. Here's my implementation if you're interested:

    public static IEnumerable<TSource> DistinctBy<TSource, TKey>
        (this IEnumerable<TSource> source,
         Func<TSource, TKey> keySelector)
    {
        return source.DistinctBy(keySelector,
                                 EqualityComparer<TKey>.Default);
    }

    public static IEnumerable<TSource> DistinctBy<TSource, TKey>
        (this IEnumerable<TSource> source,
         Func<TSource, TKey> keySelector,
         IEqualityComparer<TKey> comparer)
    {
        if (source == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
        }
        if (keySelector == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("keySelector");
        }
        if (comparer == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("comparer");
        }
        return DistinctByImpl(source, keySelector, comparer);
    }

    private static IEnumerable<TSource> DistinctByImpl<TSource, TKey>
        (IEnumerable<TSource> source,
         Func<TSource, TKey> keySelector,
         IEqualityComparer<TKey> comparer)
    {
        HashSet<TKey> knownKeys = new HashSet<TKey>(comparer);
        foreach (TSource element in source)
        {
            if (knownKeys.Add(keySelector(element)))
            {
                yield return element;
            }
        }
    }
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Thanks for the swift answer - I might use that! Any idea why they skipped all these ...By(Predicate) methods? –  Keith Feb 6 '09 at 12:10
    
Not really, I'm afraid. I'll blog about the MoreLinq project when I've got a significant set of features... basically it'll be an open source project with extensions to LINQ to Objects, and probably Push LINQ too. –  Jon Skeet Feb 6 '09 at 12:16
7  
If I had to guess, I'd guess for parity with the IQueryable<T> options, and what is realistic (without getting sick) in TSQL. So DISTINCT(table.column) is fine, but you'd need a handy key and some more complex TSQL for DistinctBy... –  Marc Gravell Feb 6 '09 at 12:26
    
That's a good point Marc - if you'd posted it as an answer I'd have voted it up. –  Keith Feb 6 '09 at 15:11

Jon, your solution is pretty good. One minor change though. I don't think we need EqualityComparer.Default in there. Here is my solution (ofcourse the starting point was Jon Skeet's solution)

    public static IEnumerable<T> DistinctBy<T, TKey>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, TKey> keySelector)
    {
        //TODO All arg checks
        HashSet<TKey> keys = new HashSet<TKey>();
        foreach (T item in source)
        {
            TKey key = keySelector(item);
            if (!keys.Contains(key))
            {
                keys.Add(key);
                yield return item;
            }
        }
    }
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1  
I'm not sure why this would be better than Jon's solution. new HashSet<TKey>() will use EqualityComparer<TKey>.Default anyway and by doing it your way you lose the ability to override it (for instance if TKey is string and you want case insensitivity). Also Jon uses the HashSet.Add method, while you use HashSet.Contains and then HashSet.Add - two operations. Admittedly you'd need a massive set to notice the difference, but why make it slower? –  Keith Jun 21 '12 at 8:36

But that seems messy.

It's not messy, it's correct.

  • If you want Distinct Programmers by FirstName and there are four David's, which one do you want?
  • If you Group programmers By FirstName and take the First one, then it is clear what you want to do in the case of four David's.

I can only use it here because I have a single key.

You can do a multiple key "distinct" with the same pattern:

return myList
  .GroupBy( x => new { x.Url, x.Age } )
  .Select( g => g.First() );
share|improve this answer
    
I hadn't thought of using anon types like that - it's a good idea (+1) –  Keith Feb 6 '09 at 15:47

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