Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm designing a simple form creation engine, in which users may compose new forms using various boilerplate field types (Date, Text, DropDown)

I decided to model the domain object (Form Field) independently of the objects that would be used to render these fields to a UI.

Here's the interface that defines the contract for the domain and some of it's specializations:

namespace Acme.Core.Domain{
    public interface IFormField
            {
                bool Visible { get; set; }
                string Key { get; set; }
                event EventHandler<FieldVisibilityChangedEventArgs> VisibilityChanged;
                FieldType Type{get;}
                void Validate(IEnumerable<ValidationError> errors);
                int DataId {get;set;}
            }

    public interface IDropDownField:IFormField{

                IDictionary<string, string> Items { get; set; }
                KeyValuePair<string, string> SelectedValue { get; set; }

        }
     public interface IDateField:IFormField{

                DateTime? SelectedDate{get;set}

        }
}

For the UI side of things, I constructed a parallel type hierarchy. This keeps the domain object, which is concerned with business rules around data validation separate from UI concerns, namely how to render a given field (MVC HtmlHelper vs WebForm WebControl):

namespace Acme.UI{

        public interface IControl 
        {
                //parallel to IFormField
                bool Visible { get; set; }
                string ID { get; set; }     
        }

        public interface IDropListControl:IControl 
        {
                //parallel to IDropDownField

        }
        public interface IDatePickerControl: IControl 
        {
                //parallel to IDateField

        }

       public interface IControlFactory {

             IControl CreateControl(IFormField field);
       }
    }

While this design gives me the freedom to design the domain model independently of the UI, I haven't come across a clean way to connect and manage the two hierarchies. I feel like I should be able to leverage generics to connect parallel classes to one another, but I can't quite grok how that would look. Is there a pattern that solves the association problem or eliminates the need for a parallel class hierarchies altogether?

EDIT: My UI tier references the my business layer (Core.csproj). Here are a few examples of how I connect the UI class hierarchy to the domain class hierarchy. These types don't currently use generics, but I feel that they ought to.

    // create concrete instances of IControl based on the the domain object passed in 
   public interface IControlFactory {

                 IControl CreateControl(IFormField field);
       }
       // scrape values form the UI controls and apply them to the appropriate domain object
       public interface IFormFieldDataBinder{

                void Bind(IFormField field, IControl control);
       }
share|improve this question
    
How do you put the two together in a final application? Will the UI interfaces refer to the domain interfaces? –  Jordão Mar 9 '11 at 18:40

1 Answer 1

I think the difference between the two hierarchies are so small you really should consider what the value -or- distinction is. If all you are considering is having, for instance, multiple dropdownlist controls that have a different rendering forms then ask yourself, if not in the designer, where are you going to pick concrete controls?

Perhaps your IDropdownListControl can be a base class with an abstract 'Render' method?

Your IFormField and IControl are so similar, I don't see what you buy with having both?

The IDropDownField in particular really looks like a model object in MVC terms, it's about data the field would hold when a form is instantiated. It's not about how a form is shaped (you stated it was a domain model).

Should all IDropListControls support the model IDropDownField perhaps? (in which case I would really just drop the IDropDownField and declare the properties directly on IDropListControl).

Consider the Reused Abstraction Principle. For every interface you create, can you think of two implementations or are they really just concrete classes?

share|improve this answer
    
The two class hierarchies are more different than I represented them to be and I edited my question to reflect this. For example, I use my domain objects to perform data validation, to determine whether they should be visible/hidden, and to handle other business rule centric operations. The UI class hierarchy is only concerned with how to represent one of the domain objects (i.e. fields) in a specific UI tech. Currently, the UI tech is Asp.Net WebControls, but I could easily swap it out to be MVC HtmlHelpers in the future. For this reason, I don't think I can merge the two families together. –  Hans Gruber Mar 7 '11 at 2:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.