Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I hope this makes sense. When I use a Hex editor and hover over a hex value you can see a 8, 16, 32 and 64 bit number (see screen shot for better idea)

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=2298915&l=e45630aead&id=1283154964

Is there a way to pull that number out using Java, I need to pull the 64bit number out I don't know if this is possible?

If any one knows I would be very greatful!

Many thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
So, do you have your hexadecimal value as String and want to use it in Java as a number? Or do you have a file from which you want to read it as bytes? Or do you want to connect with Java to your hex-editor? –  Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 5 '11 at 0:10
    
Does the Hex editor obey the normal rules of copy-and-paste on your platform? Can you make copy a number that you can then paste to the command prompt? –  Stephen C Mar 5 '11 at 0:12
    
There's not enough information to answer your question. You need to know something about the format of the number. A 64-bit integer could be represented in multiple ways. Is it little endian? Big endian? Unsigned? Two's complement? –  rlibby Mar 5 '11 at 0:17
    
@rlibby in Java a 64 bit number is represented exactly one way - long. –  corsiKa Mar 5 '11 at 0:48
    
@glowcoder, yes, but Simon hasn't said where this file came from. Do we have any reason to think that this is, in fact, a Java long? –  rlibby Mar 5 '11 at 1:08

1 Answer 1

If you have a string of HEX that you want to convert to a 64 bit number, you can use

long asHex = Long.parseLong(theHexValue,16); // 16 denotes as hex

This will produce a SIGNED long value. If you're looking for > 2^63, you need to use BigInteger

BigInteger asHex = new BigInteger(theHexValue,16);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.