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I've played around with ruby on rails' ActiveRecord::Migration class and I like how easy it is to keep database schemas versioned. I want to do something similar in my ASP.NET project and I'm wondering if anyone has heard of a tool that does what ActiveRecord::Migration does but for .NET.

I don't see the need of defining my SQL scripts in C# or ruby code, I just want to write SQL. But is there a tool that manages SQL scripts and keeps track of what scripts you need to run to get in sync?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

migratordotnet is a database versioning system much like Ruby on Rail's Migrations. Its purpose is to automate your database changes, and help keep those changes in sync throughout your environments.

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Thanks! This is exactly what I'm looking for! But one more thing, what do I do if I want to write SQL that's specific to SQL Server 2008, like a covered index or XML column or something like that? Is there a way to have arbitrary SQL as part of the Up or Down? –  kelloti Mar 5 '11 at 15:06
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From code.google.com/p/migratordotnet/wiki/WritingMigrations it looks like you can use the ExecuteNonQuery method for executing arbitrary SQL. –  David Atkinson Mar 6 '11 at 21:44
    
@David - Thanks. But I thought you were a rep for Red Gate. Aren't you supposed to be talking me into using SQL Compare :p –  kelloti Mar 7 '11 at 14:45
    
Indeed, but they're not quite the same thing. SQL Compare will generate the migration script SQL, rather than manage the scripts between specific schema versions. However, this is a feature that's coming soon so watch this space! –  David Atkinson Mar 7 '11 at 18:50

Here's one that focuses on cross database compatibility: https://github.com/dradovic/MigSharp/wiki/Feature-Overview

Write your migration once, and let them run on different platforms.

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this looks like an interesting twist on ActiveRecord::Migration. I will definitely look this one over –  kelloti Mar 7 '11 at 14:47

Database projects in Visual Studio have the features that you need. You can do schema comparisons to keep track of the differences between schema versions. They can also handle deployment, although your deployment needs may differ.

Database Projects @ MSDN

There are also other 3rd party tools that may be used as well, such as SQL Compare by Redgate.

SQL Compare by Redgate

Added:

Unfortunately, neither of these has intrinsic support for git. But, this wouldn't prevent you from bridging the gap if you don't mind doing most of the work yourself.

With Visual Studio, you can use MSBuild to automatically run scripts/executables associated with compile actions. From there, you could attach your own interactions with git.

MSBuild Reference @ MSDN

If you're looking for a tool that can automatically deploy a schema change from git, I don't know of any that exist at this time; but you could roll your own using SMO. It has all the functionality you need to be able to script SQL Server objects and execute scripts against SQL Server. You will probably have to do your own incremental scripts for table changes (as a matter of safety), but you could do drop/replace for many other objects that aren't data (Stored Procedures, User Functions, etc.).

SQL Server Management Objects @ MSDN

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Will either of these work with my git repository? –  kelloti Mar 5 '11 at 0:53

Red Gate is considering a migrations feature which will integrate with SQL Source Control and SQL Compare. If you're interested in this, please consider filling in our research survey and let us know what your requirements are. Filling the survey will also entitle you to join our early access program.

http://www.surveymk.com/s/migrations

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this sounds like propaganda...very useful propaganda :) thanks! –  kelloti Mar 6 '11 at 0:01

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