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This c++ code prints out the following prime numbers: 3 5 7 11 13 17 19 23 29 31 37 41 43 47 53 59 61 67 71 73 79 83 89 97.

But I don't think that's the way my book wants it to be written. It mentions something about square root of a number. So I did try changing my 2nd loop to for (int j=2; j<sqrt(i); j++) but it did not give me the result I needed.

How would I need to change this code to the way my book wants it to be?

int main () 
{
    for (int i=2; i<100; i++) 
        for (int j=2; j<i; j++)
        {
            if (i % j == 0) 
                break;
            else if (i == j+1)
                cout << i << " ";

        }   
    return 0;
}

A prime integer number is one that has exactly two different divisors, namely 1 and the number itself. Write, run, and test a C++ program that finds and prints all the prime numbers less than 100. (Hint: 1 is a prime number. For each number from 2 to 100, find Remainder = Number % n, where n ranges from 2 to sqrt(number). \ If n is greater than sqrt(number), the number is not equally divisible by n. Why? If any Remainder equals 0, the number is no a prime number.)

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What book are you referring to? –  Andrew Marshall Mar 5 '11 at 1:00
9  
If you ever have to generate prime numbers in the future, check out the Sieve of Eratosthenes –  Marlon Mar 5 '11 at 1:06
8  
@Sahat your book is wrong. 1 is not a prime number. It is neither prime nor composite. –  corsiKa Mar 5 '11 at 1:13
3  
@R..: that certainly would generate a downvote from me. Buggered if I'm going to bother downloading a list of all primes up to 2 billion and bloat my code with it, just because computing them myself would be boring. –  Steve Jessop Mar 5 '11 at 1:20
1  
@R..: I dunno, I can write some pretty compact code to generate them, I'd guess the break point on binary size is at most perhaps 100 primes if stored as int (400 bytes of x86 or ARM to generate primes is extravagant, whether the compiler actually emits that is another question), the breakpoint on source size is smaller, but once you pull in printf the binary gets larger. Issue with string literals, if we take it seriously (and I sort of agree we don't have to at the level of 4k), applies to arrays too since you need to initialize them in a single "logical source line". –  Steve Jessop Mar 5 '11 at 10:42
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16 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Three ways:

1.

int main () 
{
    for (int i=2; i<100; i++) 
        for (int j=2; j*j<=i; j++)
        {
            if (i % j == 0) 
                break;
            else if (j+1 > sqrt(i)) {
                cout << i << " ";

            }

        }   

    return 0;
}

2.

int main () 
{
    for (int i=2; i<100; i++) 
    {
        bool prime=true;
        for (int j=2; j*j<=i; j++)
        {
            if (i % j == 0) 
            {
                prime=false;
                break;    
            }
        }   
        if(prime) cout << i << " ";
    }
    return 0;
}

3.

#include <vector>
int main()
{
    std::vector<int> primes;
    primes.push_back(2);
    for(int i=3; i < 100; i++)
    {
        bool prime=true;
        for(int j=0;j<primes.size() && primes[j]*primes[j] <= i;j++)
        {
            if(i % primes[j] == 0)
            {
                prime=false;
                break;
            }
        }
        if(prime) 
        {
            primes.push_back(i);
            cout << i << " ";
        }
    }

    return 0;
}

Edit: In the third example, we keep track of all of our previously calculated primes. If a number is divisible by a non-prime number, there is also some prime <= that divisor which it is also divisble by. This reduces computation by a factor of primes_in_range/total_range.

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1  
You could improve your outer loop on the 3rd example: for (int i=3; i<100; i+=2) –  ZeroDefect Feb 24 '13 at 1:06
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If j is equal to sqrt(i) it might also be a valid factor, not only if it's smaller.

To iterate up to and including sqrt(i) in your inner loop, you could write:

for (int j=2; j*j<=i; j++)

(Compared to using sqrt(j) this has the advantage to not need conversion to floating point numbers.)

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+1 Hadn't thought of j*j instead of sqrt(i). –  quasiverse Mar 5 '11 at 1:13
1  
Instead of computing j*j at each step, you can use the fact that (j+1)*(j+1)=j*j+2*j+1 to keep a running accumulator for j*j. I would say let the compiler do that, but my faith in compilers is failing these days... –  R.. Mar 5 '11 at 2:07
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If a number has divisors, at least one of them must be less than or equal to the square root of the number. When you check divisors, you only need to check up to the square root, not all the way up to the number being tested.

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This is my very simple c++ program to list down the prime numbers in between 2 and 100.

for(int j=2;j<=100;++j)
{
    int i=2;
    for(;i<=j-1;i++)
    {
        if(j%i == 0)
            break;
    }

    if(i==j && i != 2)
        cout<<j<<endl;
}
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actually the better solution is to use "A prime sieve or prime number sieve" which "is a fast type of algorithm for finding primes" .. wikipedia

The simple (but not faster) algorithm is called "sieve of eratosthenes" and can be done in the following steps(from wikipedia again):

  1. Create a list of consecutive integers from 2 to n: (2, 3, 4, ..., n).
  2. Initially, let p equal 2, the first prime number.
  3. Starting from p, count up in increments of p and mark each of these numbers greater than p itself in the list. These numbers will be 2p, 3p, 4p, etc.; note that some of them may have already been marked.
  4. Find the first number greater than p in the list that is not marked. If there was no such number, stop. Otherwise, let p now equal this number (which is the next prime), and repeat from step 3.
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It's fine to change your for loop to for (int j=2; j<=sqrt(i); j++) but then you also need to change something else. Looking specifically at your print condition,

else if (i == j+1) {
      cout << i << " ";
}

why will that never be triggered if you only iterate up to sqrt(i)? Where can you move the cout to to change this? (Hint: you may want to move the print out of the loop and then make use of some type of flag variable)

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I check if a number is prime or not with the following code( of course using sqrt ):

bool IsPrime(const unsigned int x)
{
  const unsigned int TOP
  = static_cast<int>(
      std::sqrt( static_cast<double>( x ) )
    ) + 1;

  for ( int i=2; i != TOP; ++i )
  {
    if (x % i == 0) return false;
  }
  return true;
}

I use this method to determine the primes:

#include <iostream>

using std::cout;
using std::cin;
using std::endl;

#include <cmath>

void initialize( unsigned int *, const unsigned int );
void show_list( const unsigned int *, const unsigned int );
void criba( unsigned int *, const unsigned int );
void setItem ( unsigned int *, const unsigned int, const unsigned int );

bool IsPrime(const unsigned int x)
{
  const unsigned int TOP
  = static_cast<int>(
      std::sqrt( static_cast<double>( x ) )
    ) + 1;

  for ( int i=2; i != TOP; ++i )
  {
    if (x % i == 0) return false;
  }
  return true;
}

int main()
{

    unsigned int *l;
    unsigned int n;

    cout << "Ingrese tope de criba" << endl;
    cin >> n;

    l = new unsigned int[n];

    initialize( l, n );

    cout << "Esta es la lista" << endl;
    show_list( l, n );

    criba( l, n );  

    cout << "Estos son los primos" << endl;
    show_list( l, n );
}

void initialize( unsigned int *l, const unsigned int n)
{
    for( int i = 0; i < n - 1; i++ )
        *( l + i ) = i + 2;
}

void show_list( const unsigned int *l, const unsigned int n)
{
    for( int i = 0; i < n - 1; i++ )
    {
        if( *( l + i ) != 0)
            cout << l[i] << " - ";
    }
    cout << endl;
}

void setItem( unsigned int *l, const unsigned int n, const unsigned int p)
{
    unsigned int i = 2;
    while( p * i <= n)
    {
        *( l + (i * p - 2) ) = 0;
        i++;
    }
}

void criba( unsigned int *l, const unsigned int n)
{
    for( int i = 0;  i * i <= n ; i++ )
     if( IsPrime ( *( l + i) ) )
        setItem( l, n, *(l + i) );      
}
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Using the rules of divisibility prime numbers can be found out in O(n) and it`s really effecient Rules of Divisibility

The solution would be based on the individual digits of the number...

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Primes up to 100 is especially easy.

printf("2 3 ");
int m5=25, m7=49, i=5, d=2;
for( ; i<100; i+=d, d=6-d )
{
    if( i!=m5 && i!=m7) printf("%d ", i);
    if( m5 <= i ) m5+=10;
    if( m7 <= i ) m7+=14;
}

The square root of 100 is 10, and this rendition of the sieve of Eratosthenes with a 2-3 wheel, only uses the primes not greater than 10, viz., 2,3,5, and 7.

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#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
void main()
{
        int num,i,j,prime;
    cout<<"Enter the upper limit :";
    cin>>num;
    cout<<"Prime numbers till "<<num<<" are :2, ";

    for(i=3;i<=num;i++)
    {
        prime=1;
        for(j=2;j<i;j++)
        {
            if(i%j==0)
            {
                prime=0;
                break;
            }
        }
        if(prime==1)
            cout<<i<<", ";
    }
}
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This the perfect code to find the number of prime numbers below a given number. –  Gaurav Mar 11 '12 at 17:02
    
Imperfection lies in the time-complexity of this, you can improve it by changing inner loop as j*j < i –  Pungs Sep 17 '13 at 13:24
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Here is my implementation of Sieve of Eratosthenes (for primes between 2 & n)

#include <iostream>

int main (){
int n=0;
std::cout << "n = ";
std::cin >> n;
std::cout << std::endl;

if (n==0 || n==1){
    std::cout << "No primes in this range" << std::endl;
    return 0;
}


const int array_len = n-2+1;

int the_int_array[array_len];
for (int counter=2; counter <=n; counter++)
    the_int_array[counter-2]=counter;


int runner = 0;
int new_runner = 0;

while (runner < array_len ){
    if (the_int_array[runner]!=0){
        new_runner = runner;
        new_runner = new_runner + the_int_array[runner];

        while (new_runner < array_len){
           the_int_array[new_runner] = 0;
           new_runner = (new_runner + the_int_array[runner]);
        }
    }
runner++;
}

runner = 0;

while (runner < array_len ){
    if (the_int_array[runner]!=0)
        std::cout << the_int_array[runner] << " ";
    runner++;
}

std::cout << std::endl;
return 0;

}

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#include "stdafx.h"
#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
void main()
{ int f =0;
 for(int i=2;i<=100;i++)
  {
   f=0;
   for(int j=2;j<=i/2;j++)
   { 
     if(i%j==0)
     { f=1;
       break;
     }
   }
 if (f==0)
  cout<<i<<" ";
}
 system("pause");
}
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this is my approach from a simple blog:

//Prime Numbers generation in C++
//Using for loops and conditional structures
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
int a = 2;       //start from 2
long long int b = 1000;     //ends at 1000

for (int i = a; i <= b; i++)
{

 for (int j = 2; j <= i; j++)
 {
    if (!(i%j)&&(i!=j))    //Condition for not prime
        {
            break;
        }

    if (j==i)             //condition for Prime Numbers
        {
              cout << i << endl;

        }
 }
}
}

- See more at: http://www.programmingtunes.com/generation-of-prime-numbers-c/#sthash.YoWHqYcm.dpuf

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Just try that Its mush easy without any extra built in functions.

#include <iostream.h>
#include <conio.h>

int prime(int n,int r){

  for(int i=2;n<=r;i++){
    if(i==2 || i==3 || i==5 || i==7){
      cout<<i<<"\n";
      n++;
    } else if(i%2==0 || i%3==0 || i%5==0 || i%7==0)
      continue;
    else {
      cout<<i<<"\n";
      n++;
    }
  }

}

main(){
  int a=1,b;
  cout<<"Please Enter the number of prime number to display: "; 
  //Taking the range of no's of prime number to be displayed 
  //in your condition u can give 100 as range on input

  cin>>b;

  prime(a,b);
  getch();
}
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I allways use this one (it's easy and fast) :

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int i,j;
bool b[101];

int main( )
{
    for(i=2;i<101;i++){
        b[i]=true;
    }
    for(i=1;i<101;i++){
        if(b[i]){
            cout<<i<<" ";
            for(j=i*2;j<101;j+=i) b[j]=false;
        }
    }
}

output: 2 3 5 7 11 13 17 19 23 29 31 37 41 43 47 53 59 61 67 71 73 79 83 89 97

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To find whether no. is prime or not C++:

#include<iostream>
#include<cmath>

using namespace std;
int main(){

int n, counter=0;

cout <<"Enter a number to check whether it is prime or not \n";
cin>>n;

  for(int i=2; i<=n-1;i++) {
    if (n%i==0) {
      cout<<n<<" is NOT a prime number \n";
      break;
    }
    counter++;
                }
    //cout<<"Value n is "<<n<<endl;
    //cout << "number of times counter run is "<<counter << endl;
    if (counter == n-2)
      cout << n<< " is prime \n";
   return 0;
}
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