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I am trying to work with FileStream.Seek to quickly jump to a line and read it.

However, I am not getting the right results. I have tried to look at this for a while and can't understand what I am doing wrong.

Environment:
OS: Windows 7
Framework: .NET 4.0
IDE: Visual C# Express 2010

Sample Data in file location: C:\Temp\Temp.txt

0001|100!2500
0002|100!2500
0003|100!2500
0004|100!2500
0005|100!2500
0006|100!2500
0007|100!2500
0008|100!2500
0009|100!2500
0010|100!2500

The code:

class PaddedFileSearch
{
    private int LineLength { get; set; }
    private string FileName { get; set; }

    public PaddedFileSearch()
    {
        FileName = @"C:\Temp\Temp.txt";     // This is a padded file.  All lines are of the same length.

        FindLineLength();
        Debug.Print("File Line length: {0}", LineLength);

        // TODO: This purely for testing.  Move this code out.
        SeekMethod(new int[] { 5, 3, 4 });
        /*  Expected Results:
         *  Line No     Position        Line
         *  -------     --------        -----------------
         *  3           30              0003|100!2500
         *  4           15              0004|100!2500
         *  5           15              0005|100!2500 -- This was updated after the initial request.
         */

        /* THIS DOES NOT GIVE THE EXPECTED RESULTS */
        SeekMethod(new int[] { 5, 3 });
        /*  Expected Results:
         *  Line No     Position        Line
         *  -------     --------        -----------------
         *  3           30              0003|100!2500
         *  5           30              0005|100!2500
         */
    }

    private void FindLineLength()
    {
        string line;

        // Add check for FileExists

        using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(FileName))
        {
            if ((line = reader.ReadLine()) != null)
            {
                LineLength = line.Length + 2;
                // The 2 is for NewLine(\r\n)
            }
        }

    }

    public void SeekMethod(int[] lineNos)
    {
        long position = 0;
        string line = null;

        Array.Sort(lineNos);

        Debug.Print("");
        Debug.Print("Line No\t\tPosition\t\tLine");
        Debug.Print("-------\t\t--------\t\t-----------------");

        using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(FileName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.None))
        {
            using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(fs))
            {
                foreach (int lineNo in lineNos)
                {
                    position = (lineNo - 1) * LineLength - position;
                    fs.Seek(position, SeekOrigin.Current);

                    if ((line = reader.ReadLine()) != null)
                    {
                        Debug.Print("{0}\t\t\t{1}\t\t\t\t{2}", lineNo, position, line);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

The output I get:

File Line length: 15

Line No     Position        Line
-------     --------        -----------------
3           30              0003|100!2500
4           15              0004|100!2500
5           45              0005|100!2500

Line No     Position        Line
-------     --------        -----------------
3           30              0003|100!2500
5           30              0004|100!2500

My problem is with the following output:

Line No     Position        Line
-------     --------        -----------------
5           30              0004|100!2500

The output for Line should be: 0005|100!2500

I don't understand why this is happening.

Am I doing something wrong? Is there a workaround? Also are there faster ways to do this using something like seek?
(I am looking for code based options and NOT Oracle or SQL Server. For the sake of argument lets also say that the file size 1 GB.)

Any help is greatly appreciated.

Thanks.

UPDATE:
I found 4 great answers here. Thanks a lot.

Sample Timings:
Based on a few runs the following are the methods from best to good. Even the good is very close to best.
In a file that contains 10K lines, 2.28 MB. I searched for same 5000 random lines using all the options.

  1. Seek4: Time elapsed: 00:00:00.0398530 ms -- Ritch Melton
  2. Seek3: Time elapsed: 00:00:00.0446072 ms -- Valentin Kuzub
  3. Seek1: Time elapsed: 00:00:00.0538210 ms -- Jake
  4. Seek2: Time elapsed: 00:00:00.0889589 ms -- bitxwise

Shown below is the code. After saving the code you can simply call it by typing TestPaddedFileSeek.CallPaddedFileSeek();. You will also have to specify the namespace and the "using references".

`

/// <summary>
/// This class multiple options of reading a by line number in a padded file (all lines are the same length).
/// The idea is to quick jump to the file.
/// Details about the discussions is available at: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/5201414/having-a-problem-while-using-filestream-seek-in-c-solved
/// </summary>
class PaddedFileSeek
{
    public FileInfo File {get; private set;}
    public int LineLength { get; private set; }

    #region Private methods
    private static int FindLineLength(FileInfo fileInfo)
    {
        using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(fileInfo.FullName))
        {
            string line;
            if ((line = reader.ReadLine()) != null)
            {
                int length = line.Length + 2;   // The 2 is for NewLine(\r\n)
                return length;
            }
        }
        return 0;
    }

    private static void PrintHeader()
    {
       /*
        Debug.Print("");
        Debug.Print("Line No\t\tLine");
        Debug.Print("-------\t\t--------------------------");
       */ 
    }

    private static void PrintLine(int lineNo, string line)
    {
        //Debug.Print("{0}\t\t\t{1}", lineNo, line);
    }

    private static void PrintElapsedTime(TimeSpan elapsed)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine("Time elapsed: {0} ms", elapsed);
    }
    #endregion

    public PaddedFileSeek(FileInfo fileInfo)
    {
        // Possibly might have to check for FileExists
        int length = FindLineLength(fileInfo);
        //if (length == 0) throw new PaddedProgramException();
        LineLength = length;
        File = fileInfo;
    }

    public void CallAll(int[] lineNoArray, List<int> lineNoList)
    {
        Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();

        #region Seek1
        // Create new stopwatch
        sw.Start();

        Debug.Write("Seek1: ");
        // Print Header
        PrintHeader();

        Seek1(lineNoArray);

        // Stop timing
        sw.Stop();

        // Print Elapsed Time
        PrintElapsedTime(sw.Elapsed);

        sw.Reset();
        #endregion

        #region Seek2
        // Create new stopwatch
        sw.Start();

        Debug.Write("Seek2: ");
        // Print Header
        PrintHeader();

        Seek2(lineNoArray);

        // Stop timing
        sw.Stop();

        // Print Elapsed Time
        PrintElapsedTime(sw.Elapsed);

        sw.Reset();
        #endregion

        #region Seek3
        // Create new stopwatch
        sw.Start();

        Debug.Write("Seek3: ");
        // Print Header
        PrintHeader();

        Seek3(lineNoArray);

        // Stop timing
        sw.Stop();

        // Print Elapsed Time
        PrintElapsedTime(sw.Elapsed);

        sw.Reset();
        #endregion

        #region Seek4
        // Create new stopwatch
        sw.Start();

        Debug.Write("Seek4: ");

        // Print Header
        PrintHeader();

        Seek4(lineNoList);

        // Stop timing
        sw.Stop();

        // Print Elapsed Time
        PrintElapsedTime(sw.Elapsed);

        sw.Reset();
        #endregion

    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Option by Jake
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="lineNoArray"></param>
    public void Seek1(int[] lineNoArray)
    {
        long position = 0;
        string line = null;

        Array.Sort(lineNoArray);

        using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(File.FullName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.None))
        {
            using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(fs))
            {
                foreach (int lineNo in lineNoArray)
                {
                    position = (lineNo - 1) * LineLength;
                    fs.Seek(position, SeekOrigin.Begin);

                    if ((line = reader.ReadLine()) != null)
                    {
                        PrintLine(lineNo, line);
                    }

                    reader.DiscardBufferedData();
                }
            }
        }

    }

    /// <summary>
    /// option by bitxwise
    /// </summary>
    public void Seek2(int[] lineNoArray)
    {
        string line = null;
        long step = 0;

        Array.Sort(lineNoArray);

        using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(File.FullName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.None))
        {
            // using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(fs))
            // If you put "using" here you will get WRONG results.
            // I would like to understand why this is.
            {
                foreach (int lineNo in lineNoArray)
                {
                    StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(fs);
                    step = (lineNo - 1) * LineLength - fs.Position;
                    fs.Position += step;

                    if ((line = reader.ReadLine()) != null)
                    {
                        PrintLine(lineNo, line);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Option by Valentin Kuzub
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="lineNoArray"></param>
    #region Seek3
    public void Seek3(int[] lineNoArray)
    {
        long position = 0; // totalPosition = 0;
        string line = null;
        int oldLineNo = 0;

        Array.Sort(lineNoArray);

        using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(File.FullName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.None))
        {
            using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(fs))
            {
                foreach (int lineNo in lineNoArray)
                {
                    position = (lineNo - oldLineNo - 1) * LineLength;
                    fs.Seek(position, SeekOrigin.Current);
                    line = ReadLine(fs, LineLength);
                    PrintLine(lineNo, line);
                    oldLineNo = lineNo;

                }
            }
        }

    }

    #region Required Private methods
    /// <summary>
    /// Currently only used by Seek3
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="stream"></param>
    /// <param name="length"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    private static string ReadLine(FileStream stream, int length)
    {
        byte[] bytes = new byte[length];
        stream.Read(bytes, 0, length);
        return new string(Encoding.UTF8.GetChars(bytes));
    }
    #endregion
    #endregion

    /// <summary>
    /// Option by Ritch Melton
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="lineNoArray"></param>
    #region Seek4
    public void Seek4(List<int> lineNoList)
    {
        lineNoList.Sort();

        using (var fs = new FileStream(File.FullName, FileMode.Open))
        {
            lineNoList.ForEach(ln => OutputData(fs, ln));
        }

    }

    #region Required Private methods
    private void OutputData(FileStream fs, int lineNumber)
    {
        var offset = (lineNumber - 1) * LineLength;

        fs.Seek(offset, SeekOrigin.Begin);

        var data = new byte[LineLength];
        fs.Read(data, 0, LineLength);

        var text = DecodeData(data);
        PrintLine(lineNumber, text);
    }

    private static string DecodeData(byte[] data)
    {
        var encoding = new UTF8Encoding();
        return encoding.GetString(data);
    }

    #endregion

    #endregion
}



static class TestPaddedFileSeek
{
    public static void CallPaddedFileSeek()
    {
        const int arrayLenght = 5000;
        int[] lineNoArray = new int[arrayLenght];
        List<int> lineNoList = new List<int>();
        Random random = new Random();
        int lineNo;
        string fileName;


        fileName = @"C:\Temp\Temp.txt";

        PaddedFileSeek seeker = new PaddedFileSeek(new FileInfo(fileName));

        for (int n = 0; n < 25; n++)
        {
            Debug.Print("Loop no: {0}", n + 1);

            for (int i = 0; i < arrayLenght; i++)
            {
                lineNo = random.Next(1, arrayLenght);

                lineNoArray[i] = lineNo;
                lineNoList.Add(lineNo);
            }

            seeker.CallAll(lineNoArray, lineNoList);

            lineNoList.Clear();

            Debug.Print("");
        }
    }
}

`

share|improve this question
    
Are you missing code? I don't see your file reAd/seek portion –  John Arlen Mar 5 '11 at 3:26
    
It's there, in the SeekMethod method. –  geekosaur Mar 5 '11 at 3:31
    
I don't get your positions. If line 1 is 0, 2 is 15, 3 is 30, 4 is 45(not 15?), 5 is 60 (not 30?) correct? –  Ritch Melton Mar 5 '11 at 3:50
    
@Rich You are right. I was so concentrated on the LINE result, I didn't even notice that. –  Pranav Shah Mar 5 '11 at 4:29
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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm confused by your expected positions, Line 5 at position 30 and 45, with Line 4 at 15, and 3 at 30?

Here's the core of the read logic:

    var offset = (lineNumber - 1) * LineLength;

    fs.Seek(offset, SeekOrigin.Begin);

    var data = new byte[LineLength];
    fs.Read(data, 0, LineLength);

    var text = DecodeData(data);
    Debug.Print("{0,-12}{1,-16}{2}", lineNumber, offset, text);

The full sample is here:

class PaddedFileSearch
{
    public int LineLength { get; private set; }
    public FileInfo File { get; private set; }

    public PaddedFileSearch(FileInfo fileInfo)
    {
        var length = FindLineLength(fileInfo);
        //if (length == 0) throw new PaddedProgramException();
        LineLength = length;
        File = fileInfo;
    }

    private static int FindLineLength(FileInfo fileInfo)
    {
        using (var reader = new StreamReader(fileInfo.FullName))
        {
            string line;
            if ((line = reader.ReadLine()) != null)
            {
                var length = line.Length + 2;
                return length;
            }
        }

        return 0;
    }

    public void SeekMethod(List<int> lineNumbers)
    {

        Debug.Print("");
        Debug.Print("Line No\t\tPosition\t\tLine");
        Debug.Print("-------\t\t--------\t\t-----------------");

        lineNumbers.Sort();

        using (var fs = new FileStream(File.FullName, FileMode.Open))
        {
            lineNumbers.ForEach(ln => OutputData(fs, ln));
        }
    }

    private void OutputData(FileStream fs, int lineNumber)
    {
        var offset = (lineNumber - 1) * LineLength;

        fs.Seek(offset, SeekOrigin.Begin);

        var data = new byte[LineLength];
        fs.Read(data, 0, LineLength);

        var text = DecodeData(data);
        Debug.Print("{0,-12}{1,-16}{2}", lineNumber, offset, text);
    }

    private static string DecodeData(byte[] data)
    {
        var encoding = new UTF8Encoding();
        return encoding.GetString(data);
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var seeker = new PaddedFileSearch(new FileInfo(@"D:\Desktop\Test.txt"));

        Debug.Print("File Line length: {0}", seeker.LineLength);

        seeker.SeekMethod(new List<int> { 5, 3, 4 });
        seeker.SeekMethod(new List<int> { 5, 3 });
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your help and the new code. It is definitely faster than what I was trying. If you don't mind I have a few follow-up questions, so that I can understand the code better and improve my skills. 1. Why did you decide to use List? 2. Could you please explain: "ln => OutputData(fs, ln)". Also what is it called (Lambda Expression, LINQ)? –  Pranav Shah Mar 5 '11 at 5:43
    
Also why is there an additional line between the outputs? Where does that come from? –  Pranav Shah Mar 5 '11 at 5:51
    
In this case, there's no reason to use List over Array, I just prefer List. I used a lambda expression which is just a way of defining a delegate. In this case its a single argument delegate that calls OutputData in its body. Its just a simpler syntax than declaring a private method, or using an anonymous delegate. I hope that helps. –  Ritch Melton Mar 5 '11 at 5:55
    
The newline comes from the newlines in the original file. I'm not trimming those out. Shortening the LineLength would fix it. –  Ritch Melton Mar 5 '11 at 5:58
    
Thanks a lot for the explanations –  Pranav Shah Mar 5 '11 at 6:15
show 1 more comment

Place this in the inner loop of SeekMethod(int[] lineNos):

                    position = (lineNo - 1) * LineLength;
                    fs.Seek(position, SeekOrigin.Begin);
                    reader.DiscardBufferedData();

The problem is that your position variable changes based on its previous value, and StreamReader maintains a buffer so you need to clear out buffered data when you alter the stream position.

share|improve this answer
    
This gives the expected output but causes re-seeking, which I don't think he wants... –  bitxwise Mar 5 '11 at 3:50
    
+1 for bringing StreamReader.DiscardBufferedData to my attention. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 5 '11 at 4:04
    
"This method slows performance and should be used only when absolutely necessary, such as when you want to read a portion of the contents of a StreamReader object more than once." Get rid of the StreamReader, and just use the FileStream. See my answer. –  Ritch Melton Mar 5 '11 at 4:15
    
The reader.DiscardBufferedData(); does help. I added it before the end of the loop. I am going to look at other answers as well just to check if it gives me results faster. Thanks –  Pranav Shah Mar 5 '11 at 4:21
add comment

You got pretty sick mix of position being absolute for first lineno and relative for further lineno's

Look closely here and to actual results your getting

position = (lineNo - 1) * LineLength - position;
fs.Seek(position, SeekOrigin.Current);

For values 3,4,5 you get numbers 30, 15, 45, while its obvious that if your using relative position it should be 30,15,15 since line length is 15 OR 30,0,0 if your read method performs SEEK as side effect, like filestream.Read does. And your test output is ACCIDENTLY correct (only for string values though, not positions) , you should have used not a sequence for test and look at position value more closely to see that there is no connection with string displayed and position value.

Actually your StreamReader is ignoring further fs.Seek calls and is simply reading line by line =)

Here is results for 3 5 9 input :)

Line No         Position                Line
-------         --------                -----------------
3                       30                              0003|100!2500
5                       30                              0004|100!2500
9                       90                              0005|100!2500

I believe following is closest to what your trying to achieve, a new function

private static string ReadLine(FileStream stream, int length)
        {
             byte[] bytes= new byte[length];
             stream.Read(bytes, 0, length);
             return new string(Encoding.UTF8.GetChars(bytes));  
        }

And the new loop code

int oldLine = 0;
    using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(FileName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.None))
    {
            foreach (int lineNo in lineNos)
            {
                position = (lineNo - oldLine -1) * LineLength;
                fs.Seek(position, SeekOrigin.Current);
                line = ReadLine(fs, LineLength);
                Console.WriteLine("{0}\t\t\t{1}\t\t\t\t{2}", lineNo, position, line);
                oldLine = lineNo;
            }
    }

Notice that now stream.Read function is equivalent to additional stream.Seek (Length)

New correct output and logical position changes

Line No         Position                Line
-------         --------                -----------------
3                       30                              0003|100!2500    
4                       0                               0004|100!2500    
5                       0                               0005|100!2500

Line No         Position                Line
-------         --------                -----------------
3                       30                              0003|100!2500  
5                       15                              0005|100!2500

PS: its so odd you think that 001: line is 1st line not 0th .. that whole -1 could be removed if you used programmer count method =)

share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand the position values. –  Ritch Melton Mar 5 '11 at 4:19
    
when you read consequent rows its obvious that you dont need to change position in any way and just read the next line with zero offset –  Valentin Kuzub Mar 5 '11 at 4:21
    
Ahah! it wasn't obvious to me what the position value represented. –  Ritch Melton Mar 5 '11 at 4:38
    
I had started it originally with 0. But then I thought if I ever just wanted to use it in a non-programmer user program they would think of the first line as 1. –  Pranav Shah Mar 5 '11 at 5:48
    
Thanks your code works great as well. Also it is slightly faster than @Rich solution. I will try doing a proper test later and post the results for future readers. I didn't realize that ReadLine would do the additional Seek. –  Pranav Shah Mar 5 '11 at 6:06
add comment

I wouldn't say the problem is your effort to manually manage the position value, but rather that StreamReader.ReadLine changes the stream's Position value. If you step through your code and monitor your local values, you'll see the stream's position changes after each ReadLine call (to 148 after the first).

EDIT

It would be better to just change the stream's position directly rather than use Seek

public void SeekMethod(int[] lineNos)
{
    string line = null;
    long step;

    Array.Sort(lineNos);

    Debug.Print("");
    Debug.Print("Line No\t\tPosition\t\tLine");
    Debug.Print("-------\t\t--------\t\t-----------------");

    using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(FileName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.None))
    {
        foreach (int lineNo in lineNos)
        {
            StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(fs);
            step = (lineNo - 1) * LineLength - fs.Position;
            fs.Position += step;

            if ((line = reader.ReadLine()) != null) {
                Debug.Print("{0}\t\t\t{1}\t\t\t\t{2}", lineNo, step, line);
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

The problem is you're tracking the position manually, but not accounting for the fact that the actual file position is going to be one line farther in after you've read that line. So you need to subtract out that additional read --- but only if it actually happened.

If you really want to do it this way, then instead of keeping position around, get the actual file position; or calculate the absolute file position from the given line number ad seek there directly instead of from the current file offset.

share|improve this answer
    
If I understand it correct you are asking me to change // Dynamic positioning position = (lineNo - 1) * LineLength - position; fs.Seek(position, SeekOrigin.Current); to // Absolute positioning position = (lineNo - 1) * LineLength; fs.Seek(position, SeekOrigin.Begin); I still get the same wrong result. –  Pranav Shah Mar 5 '11 at 4:13
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