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/* Program to demonstrate gaussian <strong class="highlight">elimination</strong>
   on a set of linear simultaneous equations
 */

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

const double eps = 1.e-15;

/*Preliminary pivoting strategy
  Pivoting function
 */
double pivot(vector<vector<double> > &a, vector<double> &b, int i)
 {
     int n = a.size();
     int j=i;
     double t=0;

     for(int k=i; k<n; k+=1)
     {
         double aki = fabs(a[k][i]);
         if(aki>t)
         {
             t=aki;
             j=k;
         }
     }
     if(j>i)
     {
         double dummy;
         for(int L=0; L<n; L+=1)
         {
             dummy = a[i][L];
             a[i][L]= a[j][L];
             a[j][L]= dummy;
         }
         double temp = b[j];
         b[i]=b[j];
         b[j]=temp;
     }
     return a[i][i];
 }        



/* Forward <strong class="highlight">elimination</strong> */
void triang(vector<vector<double> > &a, vector<double> &b) 
{
    int n = a.size();
    for(int i=0; i<n-1; i+=1)
    {
        double diag = pivot(a,b,i);
        if(fabs(diag)<eps)
        {
            cout<<"zero det"<<endl;
            return;
        }
        for(int j=i+1; j<n; j+=1)
        {
            double mult = a[j][i]/diag;
            for(int k = i+1; k<n; k+=1)
            {
                a[j][k]-=mult*a[i][k];
            }
            b[j]-=mult*b[i];
        }
    }
}

/*
DOT PRODUCT OF TWO VECTORS
*/
double dotProd(vector<double> &u, vector<double> &v, int k1,int k2)
{
  double sum = 0;
  for(int i = k1; i <= k2; i += 1)
  {
     sum += u[i] * v[i];
  }
  return sum;
}

/*
BACK SUBSTITUTION STEP
*/
void backSubst(vector<vector<double> > &a, vector<double> &b, vector<double> &x)
{
    int n = a.size();
  for(int i =  n-1; i >= 0; i -= 1)
  {
    x[i] = (b[i] - dotProd(a[i], x, i + 1,  n-1))/ a[i][i];
  }
}
/*
REFINED GAUSSIAN <strong class="highlight">ELIMINATION</strong> PROCEDURE
*/
void gauss(vector<vector<double> > &a, vector<double> &b, vector<double> &x)
{
   triang(a, b);
   backSubst(a, b, x);
}                               

// EXAMPLE MAIN PROGRAM
int main()
{
    int n;
    cin >> n;
    vector<vector<double> > a;
    vector<double> x;
    vector<double> b;
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        vector<double> temp;
        for (int j = 0; j < n; j++) {
            int no;
            cin >> no;
            temp.push_back(no);
        }
        a.push_back(temp);
        b.push_back(0);
        x.push_back(0);
    }
    /* 
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        int no;
        cin >> no;
        b.push_back(no);
        x.push_back(0);
    }
    */

  gauss(a, b, x);
  for (size_t i = 0; i < x.size(); i++) {
      cout << x[i] << endl;
  }
   return 0;
}

The above gaussian eleimination algorithm works fine on NxN matrices. But I need it to work on NxM matrix. Can anyone help me to do it? I am not very good at maths. I got this code on some website and i am stuck at it.

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13  
You really need to understand how to do this sort of thing on paper yourself before you can teach it to a computer. –  aschepler Mar 5 '11 at 4:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted
  1. (optional) Understand this. Do some examples on paper.
  2. Don't write code for Gaussian elimination yourself. Without some care, the naive gauss pivoting is unstable. You have to scale the lines and take care of pivoting with the greatest element, a starting point is there. Note that this advice still holds for most linear algebra algorithms.
  3. If you want to solve systems of equations, LU decomposition, QR decomposition (stabler than LU, but slower), Cholesky decomposition (in the case the system is symmetric) or SVD (in the case the system is not square) are almost always better choices. Gaussian elimination is best for computing determinants however.
  4. Use the algorithms from LAPACK for the problems which need Gaussian elimination (eg. solving systems, or computing determinants). Really. Don't roll your own. Since you are doing C++, you may be interested in Armadillo which takes care of a lot of things for you.
  5. If you must roll your own for pedagogical reasons, have a look first at Numerical Recipes, version 3. Version 2 can be found online for free if you're low on budget / have no access to a library.
  6. As a general advice, don't code algorithms you don't understand.
share|improve this answer
4  
To point 6.: for me in university it helped a lot to try to code an algorithm in order to understand it. –  white_gecko Feb 27 '13 at 23:04
1  
Yes, for production code, 6 is applicable. But for learning, it may help. Nb. 6 needs a disclaimer. Otherwise, +1. –  phresnel Oct 31 '13 at 21:44

You just cannot apply Gaussian elimination directly to an NxM problem. If you have more equations than unknowns, the your problem is over-determined and you have no solution, which means you need to use something like the least squares method. Say that you have A*x = b, then instead of having x = inv(A)*b (when N=M), then you have to do x = inv(A^T*A)*A^T*b.

In the case where you have less equations then unknowns, then your problem is underdetermined and you have an infinity of solutions. In that case, you either pick one at random (e.g. setting some of the unknowns to an arbitrary value), or you need to use regularization, which means trying adding some extra constraints.

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If you have 3 equations for 3 unknowns, the representative matrix will have 3 rows and 4 columns. –  John P Feb 7 at 16:50

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