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Let us consider the following factorial example :

#include <iostream.h>

int factorial(int);

void main(void) {
    int number;

    cout << "Please enter a positive integer: ";
    cin >> number;
    if (number < 0)
        cout << "That is not a positive integer.\n";
    else
        cout << number << " factorial is: " << factorial(number) << endl;
}

int factorial(int number) {
    int temp;

    if(number <= 1) return 1;

    temp = number * factorial(number - 1);
    return temp;
}

How can I compute the memory used the function factorial() ? To be more precise I want to know how much memory the function uses ?

EDIT:

This is just a sample program and the program I'm working on is lot different and has many functions and I actually want to calculate the memory usage of every functions.

share|improve this question
    
Are you referring to memory used by the code, data, or both? –  Jonathan Wood Mar 5 '11 at 5:31
    
If I get your point right it's both actually. This is just an example though. I want to calculate how much memory a function uses in general. Is there a way ? –  Sunil Mar 5 '11 at 5:36
    
Side notes: You should include iostream, not iostream.h; main should always return int, not void. –  Marcelo Cantos Mar 5 '11 at 5:45
    
@Marcelo: okay sure Thanks. –  Sunil Mar 5 '11 at 5:50
    
No its not possible to calculate as the compiler can do all sorts of optimizations that will change the usage. –  Loki Astari Mar 5 '11 at 5:54

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For my second answer (prompted by the comments to my first answer), you could use a function that computes how much of the stack has been touched. Here's one that hopefully doesn't make too many assumptions about the nature of the stack on a given architecture. It assumes a descending stack, which is a fairly safe bet for most people:

#define LU_RAND_SEED 123456789LU
#define LU_RAND(S) ((S) * 69069 + 362437 & 0XFFFFFFFFLU)

int depth(int maxdepth)
{
  unsigned long r = LU_RAND_SEED;
  int d = 0;
  unsigned long *stk = (unsigned long *)alloca(maxdepth);
  for (int i = maxdepth/sizeof(unsigned long); i--; )
    {
      r = LU_RAND(r);
      if (stk[i] != r)
        {
          stk[i] = r;
          d = i;
        }
    }
  return maxdepth - d*sizeof(unsigned long);
}

You call it once before the function you want to test, and once after. The second call will return how many bytes of the stack have been touched (minus some constant value that you'll have to determine experimentally). You have to make sure that only the code you are testing runs between the two calls to depth():

depth(512<<10);
int f = factorial(number);
int d = depth(512<<10);
cout << ... f ...

You also have to watch out for edge cases. For instance, if number is 0 or 1, the depth test fails for reasons I haven't figured out yet. And goodness knows what will happen if the compiler starts reusing stack slots. In a nutshell: caveat emptor.

Notes:

  1. It almost goes without saying that this technique is probabilistic. If your function happens to populate all or part of the stack with the same data as the PRNG, the result may be compromised, though the probability of being more than a few bytes off is vanishingly small.
  2. I lifted the PRNG from here. srand()/rand() or their thread-safe counterparts will probably work fine, but I wanted to avoid calling any function other than alloca().
  3. unsigned long r = (unsigned long)&r; avoids the constant seed for slightly more randomness, and it works since if the two calls to depth() are made at different stack depths, this technique will fail anyway. I just don't know how safe the seeds thus generated will be.
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This implementation gives an error: ‘alloca’ was not declared in this scope. I read that 'alloca' is not included in the C++ standard. How do I use it ? –  Sunil Mar 5 '11 at 20:48
    
@Sunil: #include <alloca.h> –  Marcelo Cantos Mar 5 '11 at 22:19
    
@Marcelo: Works like charm though I'm still trying to understand the program. I fail to see how the PRNG helps in determining the stacks being touched. –  Sunil Mar 5 '11 at 22:29
1  
@Sunil: The PRNG fills the stack with random noise. The use of a predictable seed ensures that both calls will fill the stack with exactly the same random data. The second call reports the lowest slot on the stack that has a different value to the one generated by the PRNG. You could simply fill the stack with a constant value (zero, or UINT_MAX, or something in between), but then there's a greater risk that whatever function you are trying to measure just happens to populate the stack with exactly the same value... –  Marcelo Cantos Mar 6 '11 at 0:50
1  
... This might be a moot point if you know that the lowest-used slot of the stack is, e.g., a pointer to the next stack frame, which can therefore never be the null pointer. But, I don't know if that's the case, so I used a PRNG to avoid making any assumptions. –  Marcelo Cantos Mar 6 '11 at 0:51

Since the function only uses stack memory, you can store the address of temp in a global variable just before you return 1, and compare that to the address of number:

#include <iostream.h>

int factorial(int);

void* tos;

void main(void) {
    int number;

    cout << "Please enter a positive integer: ";
    cin >> number;
    if (number < 0)
        cout << "That is not a positive integer.\n";
    else
        cout << number << " factorial is: " << factorial(number) << endl;

    cout << "factorial used " << ((char*)&number - (char*)tos) << " bytes of stack.\n";
}

int factorial(int number) {
    int temp;

    if(number <= 1) {
        tos = &temp;
        return 1;
    }

    temp = number * factorial(number - 1);
    return temp;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Oh that was just a sample program and the program I'm working on is lot different and has many functions and I wanted to calculate the memory usage of every functions. Sorry for the ambiguity. Though I find this very useful. Thank you. –  Sunil Mar 5 '11 at 5:19
    
There is no simple general solution, especially for recursive functions, which require the bottom of the recursion to somehow indicate that it is the bottom. There are complex general solutions focused on priming the stack with pseudorandomness before the call, and seeing how much of it has been modified after the call, but this is hairy stuff. Also, you might need to instrument malloc and free (and possibly other functions) if the function in question allocates dynamic memory. Perhaps if you outline what you want to achieve in broad terms, it will be easier to suggest a solution. –  Marcelo Cantos Mar 5 '11 at 5:28
    
My whole idea was to see if we have method that can calculate the number of bytes of memory used by a function in a program. Not necessarily recursive functions. It could be any function like sorting or adding or anything. I put up an recursive fn. as example because it can use large blocks of memory if an higher number is given and easy to test. –  Sunil Mar 5 '11 at 5:34
    
@Marcelo: Hurry up and finish your answer, it looks good and I want to upvote it. –  Ben Voigt Mar 5 '11 at 6:11
    
@Marcelo: I saw a second answer from you and it suddenly disappeared. :( –  Sunil Mar 5 '11 at 6:27

Use profiling tool like http://code.google.com/p/google-perftools/

or valgrind

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if you don't know how many recursions 'factorial' will have, it's impossible to determine how much memory it will consume. on 32 bit machine 1 recursion for this function should consume 8 bytes (4 bytes for return address and 4 bytes for argument)

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1  
Your answer makes a lot of assumptions about the structure of a stack frame. Compilers often add extra stuff; e.g., a pointer to the previous stack frame is very common. Also, 32-bit arguments are usually passed via registers, which reduces the size. Plus, you have to consider whether local variables live on the stack or are register-bound. Finally, these factors vary between compilers, and levels of optimisation. –  Marcelo Cantos Mar 5 '11 at 5:21
    
@Marcelo Cantos pointer to previous stack frame is hardcoded to function, so it doesn't take space on stack. Yes there are other thins like optimized/nonoptimized code, but generally from assembler programming experience on m68k (and which shouldn't be far from x86) this function should take around 8b of stackspace –  fazo Mar 5 '11 at 5:33
    
You're confusing the frame pointer with something else. Google "frame pointer omission" and you will quickly find out about uses of the frame pointer. –  Ben Voigt Mar 5 '11 at 6:05

Look at the map file that your compiler generates. This will show all the sizes.

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Could you please elaborate on this ? –  Sunil Mar 5 '11 at 5:58
  1. Calculate the maximum call depth. (should be covered in any course on algorithmic analysis)

  2. Find the stack usage per call (look at the assembly code for the function, don't forget to consult the CPU architecture manual to find out how much data a call instruction places on the stack.

  3. Find the dynamic memory usage per call, looking for functions such as malloc and realloc, C++ operator new, and container classes such as std::vector.

  4. Multiply.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately I'm not familiar about maximum call depth but it would very helpful if you could show an example using my code. Thanks –  Sunil Mar 5 '11 at 6:12
    
@Sunil: That depends on the algorithm. The factorial function you wrote goes number - 1 calls deep (easily proven by induction). –  Ben Voigt Mar 5 '11 at 6:22
    
Oh ok. Now I see what you mean. But by this way, in any program that is reasonably large it would require a lot of effort than writing the program itself to calculate the memory, isn't it? –  Sunil Mar 5 '11 at 6:26
    
@Sunil: But this way gives you an expression which is valid for the whole range of inputs, whereas measurement (e.g. Marcelo's code) tells you only for one particular input. –  Ben Voigt Mar 5 '11 at 15:33

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