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I have been trying to find a good definition, and get an understanding, of what a thread really is.

It seems that I must be missing something obvious, but every time I read about what a thread is, it's almost a circular definition, a la "a thread is a thread of execution" or " a way to divide into running tasks". Uh uh. Huh?

It seems from what I have read that a thread is not really something concrete, like a process is. It is in fact just a concept. From what I understand of the way this works, a processor executes some commands for a program (which has been termed a thread of execution), then when it needs to switch to processing for some other program for a bit, it stores the state of the program it's currently executing for somewhere (Thread Local Storage) and then starts executing the other program's instructions. And back and forth. Such that, a thread is really just a concept for "one of the paths of execution" of a program that is currently running.

Unlike a process, which really is something - it is a conglomeration of resources, etc.

As an example of a definition that didn't really help me much . . .

From Wikipedia:

"A thread in computer science is short for a thread of execution. Threads are a way for a program to divide (termed "split") itself into two or more simultaneously (or pseudo-simultaneously) running tasks. Threads and processes differ from one operating system to another but, in general, a thread is contained inside a process and different threads in the same process share same resources while different processes in the same multitasking operating system do not."

So am I right? Wrong? What is a thread really?

Edit: Apparently a thread is also given its own call stack, so that is somewhat of a concrete thing.

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"Process" is no less of an abstract term. –  hobbs Mar 5 '11 at 5:19

7 Answers 7

up vote 18 down vote accepted

A thread is an independent set of values for the processor registers (for a single core). Since this includes the Instruction Pointer (aka Program Counter), it controls what executes in what order. It also includes the Stack Pointer, which had better point to a unique area of memory for each thread or else they will interfere with each other.

Threads are the software unit affected by control flow (function call, loop, goto), because those instructions operate on the Instruction Pointer, and that belongs to a particular thread. Threads are often scheduled according to some prioritization scheme (although it's possible to design a system with one thread per processor core, in which case every thread is always running and no scheduling is needed).

In fact the value of the Instruction Pointer and the instruction stored at that location is sufficient to determine a new value for the Instruction Pointer. For most instructions, this simply advances the IP by the size of the instruction, but control flow instructions change the IP in other, predictable ways. The sequence of values the IP takes on forms a path of execution weaving through the program code, giving rise to the name "thread".

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+1. A thread isn't anything more "concrete" than a set of register values. –  Greg Hewgill Mar 5 '11 at 5:24
    
What "set of values"? What are they? How do they define a thread? –  richard Mar 5 '11 at 5:25
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@Richard: The exact list of CPU registers depends on the architecture, but instruction pointer and stack pointer are pretty much universal. They define a thread insofar as when this thread (set of register values) is loaded in the processor core, the thread is running. The processor is fetching instructions demanded by the thread and updating the thread registers. When a context switch is needed, the processor saves this set of register values into memory and loads a set belonging to a different thread, typically as part of the interrupt servicing logic. –  Ben Voigt Mar 5 '11 at 5:31
    
Thanks Ben. That's very helpful. –  richard Mar 5 '11 at 5:33

A thread is an execution context, which is all the information a CPU needs to execute a stream of instructions.

Suppose you're reading a book, and you want to take a break right now, but you want to be able to come back and resume reading from the exact point where you stopped. One way to achieve that is by jotting down the page number, line number, and word number. So your execution context for reading a book is these 3 numbers.

If you have a roommate, and she's using the same technique, she can take the book while you're not using it, and resume reading from where she stopped. Then you can take it back, and resume it from where you were.

Threads work in the same way. A CPU is giving you the illusion that it's doing multiple computations at the same time. It does that by spending a bit of time on each computation. It can do that because it has an execution context for each computation. Just like you can share a book with your friend, many tasks can share a CPU.

On a more technical level, an execution context (therefore a thread) consists of the values of the CPU's registers.

Last: threads are different from processes. A thread is a context of execution, while a process is a bunch of resources associated with a computation. A process can have one or many threads.

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A better analogy would equate person with CPU (both do something), and equate book with address-space (both just exist). That way, bookmarks in different books are like threads in different processes. A single book with more than one bookmark would be the analog of a multi-threaded process, which is what people usually mean when they say "threads." It works for a single processor machine, but it breaks down somewhat when you talk about multi-processing. Nobody cares which CPU executes function f(), but it does matter which person reads chapter 11. –  james large Jun 25 at 19:47

Processes are like two people using two different computers, who use the network to share data when necessary. Threads are like two people using the same computer, who don't have to share data explicitly but must carefully take turns.

Conceptually, threads are just multiple worker bees buzzing around in the same address space. Each thread has its own stack, its own program counter, etc., but all threads in a process share the same memory. Imagine two programs running at the same time, but they both can access the same objects.

Contrast this with processes. Processes each have their own address space, meaning a pointer in one process cannot be used to refer to an object in another (unless you use shared memory).

I guess the key things to understand are:

  • Both processes and threads can "run at the same time".
  • Processes share nothing (by default), whereas threads share everything.
  • Each thread in a process has its own stack and its own instruction pointer.
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The answer varies hugely across different systems and different implementations, but the most important parts are:

  1. A thread has an independent thread of execution (i.e. you can context-switch away from it, and then back, and it will resume running where it was).
  2. A thread has a lifetime (it can be created by another thread, and another thread can wait for it to finish).
  3. It probably has less baggage attached than a "process".

Beyond that: threads could be implemented within a single process by a language runtime, threads could be coroutines, threads could be implemented within a single process by a threading library, or threads could be a kernel construct.

In several modern Unix systems, including Linux which I'm most familiar with, everything is threads -- a process is merely a type of thread that shares relatively few things with its parent (i.e. it gets its own memory mappings, its own file table and permissions, etc.) Reading man 2 clone, especially the list of flags, is really instructive here.

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This was taken from a Yahoo Answer:

A thread is a coding construct unaffect by the architecture of an application. A single process frequently may contain multiple threads. Threads can also directly communicate with each other since they share the same variables.

Processes are independent execution units with their own state information. They also use their own address spaces and can only interact with other processes through interprocess communication mechanisms.

However, to put in simpler terms threads are like different "tasks". So think of when you are doing something, for instance you are writing down a formula on one paper. That can be considered one thread. Then another thread is you writing something else on another piece of paper. That is where multitasking comes in.

Intel processors are said to have "hyper-threading" (AMD has it too) and it is meant to be able to perform multiple "threads" or multitask much better.

I am not sure about the logistics of how a thread is handled. I do recall hearing about the processor going back and forth between them, but I am not 100% sure about this and hopefully somebody else can answer that.

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Unfortunately, threads do exist. A thread is something tangible. You can kill one, and the others will still be running. You can spawn new threads.... although each thread is not it's own process, they are running separately inside the process. On multi-core machines, 2 threads could run at the same time.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simultaneous_multithreading

http://www.intel.com/intelpress/samples/mcp_samplech01.pdf

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What is it that makes it "something tangible"? Is it just that data stored in the TLS and its call stack? –  richard Mar 5 '11 at 5:22
    
That it isn't just an abstraction for understanding... If it really were just a single thread that ran back and forth masquerading as multiple threads, the OP would be right, but yes, I would say that this data would make it tangible. –  Orbit Mar 5 '11 at 5:25
    
Enlighten me . . . so what is the answer? –  richard Mar 5 '11 at 5:29
    
@Richard not looking to get into a debate about semantics, just phrased my answer to attempt to clarify conceptually to the OP. –  Orbit Mar 5 '11 at 5:31

A route or path of execution within a program.

A single thread is usually the main thread of a program and is executed from start (running program) to finish (closing program). Multi-threading allows more than one path of execution within a program. You would have main thread (e.g. GUI) and other threads (e.g. background workers)

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