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Is there a way to check if a file is already open in Perl? I want to have a read file access, so don't require flock.

 open(FH, "<$fileName") or die "$!\n" if (<FILE_IS_NOT_ALREADY_OPEN>);
 #  or something like
 close(FH) if (<FILE_IS_OPEN>);
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6 Answers 6

up vote 31 down vote accepted

Try:

 if(tell(FH) != -1)

tell reports where in the file you are. If you get back -1, an invalid position, you aren't anywhere in the file.

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It works, Thanks :) –  matt Feb 6 '09 at 13:21
6  
causes error: ... tell() on unopened filehandle ... –  ekerner Sep 14 '11 at 6:53
    
@ekerner technically not an error but a warning. –  vladr Nov 11 '12 at 3:01

Why would you want to do that? The only reason I can think of is when you're using old style package filehandles (which you seem to be doing) and want to prevent accidentally saving one handle over another.

That issue can be resolved by using new style indirect filehandles.

open my $fh, '<', $filename or die "Couldn't open $filename: $!";
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Oh great, good to know. Thanks. –  matt Feb 6 '09 at 13:23
    
matt: try Perl::Critic for better style –  Alexandr Ciornii Feb 13 '09 at 21:45
    
Example reason why: Say you opened a filehandle with open(FH, "-|"). You want to make sure the forked process succeeds, which requires explicitly close FH to set $! or $? appropriately. If it didn't succeed, you want to raise an error; however, you don't want to raise an error if something else closed FH already. –  jon Feb 29 '12 at 18:46

Perl provides the fileno function for exactly this purpose.

EDIT I stand corrected on the purpose of fileno(). I do prefer the shorter test

fileno FILEHANDLE

over

tell FH != -1

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1  
Well... not really. It provides fileno for the purpose of getting the system file descriptor number. Determining whether the filehandle is open is a side effect (just as it's a side effect of tell). –  chaos Feb 8 '09 at 20:56
1  
And not a completely reliable side-effect either. It's possible to have a filehandle that's open to something other than a filedescriptor, in which case fileno sensibly returns undef. Examples are tied handles and handles opened to scalars. –  hobbs Aug 29 '09 at 22:55
1  
tell(FH) produces a warning with a closed filehandle. Using fileno() does not. –  Nick Dixon Mar 11 '11 at 15:10

Why do you care if it is already open? Are you trying to catch simultaneous reads?

You don't really need to care about closing the file. Either it's not open and the close fails because it has nothing to close, or the file is open and the close releases it. Either way, the file is not open on that filehandle. Just close the filehandle without caring it if is not open. Are you seeing something weird there?

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Example reason why: Say you opened a filehandle with open(FH, "-|"). You want to make sure the forked process succeeds, which requires explicitly close FH to set $! or $? appropriately. If it didn't succeed, you want to raise an error; however, you don't want to raise an error if something else closed FH already. –  jon Feb 29 '12 at 18:50
    
-1 for the unhelpful answer. If you want to discuss whether the goal of the question is actually desirable, I feel that's better done as a comment. –  jon Feb 29 '12 at 18:51
    
You miss the point. There are some things where we don't care if they fail because we end up with the result we wanted either way. We don't have to do much work to cause the result or check it because we get the same thing the either way. –  brian d foy Mar 1 '12 at 12:43

Tell produces a warning (so does stat, -s, -e, etc..) with use warnings (-w)

perl -wle '
    open my $fh, "<", "notexists.txt"; 
    print "can stat fh" if tell $fh
'
tell() on closed filehandle $fh at -e line 1.
-1

The alternatives fileno($fh) and eof($fh) do not produce warnings. I found the best alternative was to save the output from open.

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eof has side effects. See its docs. –  jon Feb 29 '12 at 18:49

The Scalar::Util module provides the openhandle() function for this. Unlike fileno(), it handles perl filehandles which aren't associated with OS filehandles. Unlike tell(), it doesn't produce warnings when used on an unopened filehandle From the module's documentation:

openhandle FH

Returns FH if FH may be used as a filehandle and is open, or FH is a tied handle. Otherwise "undef" is returned.

   $fh = openhandle(*STDIN);           # \*STDIN
   $fh = openhandle(\*STDIN);          # \*STDIN
   $fh = openhandle(*NOTOPEN);         # undef
   $fh = openhandle("scalar");         # undef
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1  
openhandle caveats –  daxim May 19 '11 at 11:03
1  
This is the only real solution, thanks. –  ekerner Sep 14 '11 at 7:16
    
tchrist's answer to the question @daxim links is rather spectacular, but seems to only be different from openhandle in that it will tell you that the string "STDIN" is open (which it technically is, it seems, as you can use it for print etc.) Now whether you would actually ever want to encourage this sort of thing is another question; I would tend to see the openhandle rejection of "STDIN" as more of a feature than a bug. –  Alex Dupuy Nov 14 '11 at 21:12
    
I came here from a Google search, and wanted to point out that the linked to $handle->opened(); WFM. –  Bill Weiss Oct 7 '12 at 1:45

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